Nga Iwi Morehu Movement

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The Nga Iwi Morehu Movement was a New Zealand Māori political party. Its name literally translates as "the surviving people" or "the remnant people". It contested the 1996 election as an unregistered party, running a single candidate and gaining 194 votes. [1] It ran two candidates in the 2002 election, winning 522 votes. [2] In the 1999 election, members of Nga Iwi Morehu stood under the banner of the Freedom Movement.

New Zealand Country in Oceania

New Zealand is a sovereign island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The country geographically comprises two main landmasses—the North Island, and the South Island —and around 600 smaller islands. New Zealand is situated some 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) east of Australia across the Tasman Sea and roughly 1,000 kilometres (600 mi) south of the Pacific island areas of New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga. Because of its remoteness, it was one of the last lands to be settled by humans. During its long period of isolation, New Zealand developed a distinct biodiversity of animal, fungal, and plant life. The country's varied topography and its sharp mountain peaks, such as the Southern Alps, owe much to the tectonic uplift of land and volcanic eruptions. New Zealand's capital city is Wellington, while its most populous city is Auckland.

Māori people Indigenous Polynesian people of New Zealand

The Māori are the indigenous Polynesian people of New Zealand. Māori originated with settlers from eastern Polynesia, who arrived in New Zealand in several waves of canoe voyages some time between 1250 and 1300. Over several centuries in isolation, the Polynesian settlers developed a unique culture, with their own language, a rich mythology, and distinctive crafts and performing arts. Early Māori formed tribal groups based on eastern Polynesian social customs and organisation. Horticulture flourished using plants they introduced; later, a prominent warrior culture emerged.

In September 2011 it applied to register its logo with the Electoral Commission. [3] The application was declined on the grounds that, in the opinion of the Electoral Commission, the logo could mislead voters into believing that the party was backed by the Ratana Church. [4]

The party stood two electorate candidates in the 2011 election under the label "Nga Iwi" — Te Ariki Karamaene in Hauraki-Waikato [5] and Jennifer Waitai-Rapana in Te Tai Hauāuru. [6] It did not stand any candidates at the 2014 election.

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References

  1. "1996 Election: Summary of Party List and Electorate Candidate Seats" (PDF). New Zealand Electoral Commission. Retrieved 28 September 2011.
  2. "2002 Election: Summary of Overall Results". New Zealand Electoral Commission. Retrieved 28 September 2011.
  3. "Application to register Nga Iwi Morehu Movement political party logo". New Zealand Electoral Commission. 27 September 2011. Retrieved 28 June 2013.
  4. "Decision not to register Nga Iwi Morehu Movement logo". New Zealand Electoral Commission. 18 October 2011. Retrieved 28 June 2013.
  5. "Information for Voters in Hauraki-Waikato". Elections New Zealand. 2 November 2011. Archived from the original on 16 October 2008.
  6. "Information for Voters in Te Tai Hauāuru". Elections New Zealand. 2 November 2011. Archived from the original on 16 October 2008.