Niangua River

Last updated
Niangua River
Osagerivermap.png
Map of the Osage River watershed showing the Niangua River
Location
Country United States
State Missouri
Physical characteristics
Source 
  location Webster County, Missouri
  coordinates 37°26′46″N92°55′11″W / 37.44611°N 92.91972°W / 37.44611; -92.91972
  elevation1,136 ft (346 m)
Mouth Lake of the Ozarks
  location
Camden County, Missouri
  coordinates
37°57′39″N92°48′22″W / 37.96083°N 92.80611°W / 37.96083; -92.80611 Coordinates: 37°57′39″N92°48′22″W / 37.96083°N 92.80611°W / 37.96083; -92.80611 [1]
  elevation
663 ft (202 m)
Length125 mi (201 km)
Basin size1,040 sq mi (2,700 km2)
Discharge 
  location USGS 06923950 at Tunnel Dam near Macks Creek, MO [2]
  average450 cu ft/s (13 m3/s)
  minimum0 cu ft/s (0 m3/s)
  maximum27,700 cu ft/s (780 m3/s)
Basin features
Tributaries 
  left Little Niangua River
WatershedsNiangua-Osage-Missouri-Mississippi

The Niangua River /nˈæŋɡwə/ is a 125-mile-long (201 km) [3] tributary of the Osage River in the Ozarks region of southern and central Missouri in the United States. Via the Osage and Missouri rivers it is part of the watershed of the Mississippi River.

Contents

Niangua River has the name of Niangua (or Nehemgar), an Indian tribal leader. [4] The name is said to mean "bear". [5]

Course

The Niangua River is formed in Webster County by the confluence of its short east and west forks, and flows generally northward through Dallas, Laclede and Camden counties, past Bennett Spring, Lake Niangua, and Ha Ha Tonka State Parks. It flows into the Osage River as an arm of the Lake of the Ozarks, which is formed by the Bagnell Dam on the Osage. As part of the lake it collects the Little Niangua River.

River accesses

This is a list of areas where the Niangua River can be publicly accessed; this list was put in order from beginning of river to where river meets up with Lake of the Ozarks.

See also

Related Research Articles

Ozarks Highland region in central-southern United States

The Ozarks, also known as the Ozark Mountains or Ozark Plateau, is a physiographic region in the U.S. states of Missouri, Arkansas, Oklahoma and the extreme southeastern corner of Kansas. The Ozarks cover a significant portion of northern Arkansas and most of the southern half of Missouri, extending from Interstate 40 in Arkansas to Interstate 70 in central Missouri.

St. Francis River river in the United States of America

The St. Francis River is a tributary of the Mississippi River, about 426 miles (686 km) long, in southeastern Missouri and northeastern Arkansas in the United States. The river drains a mostly rural area and forms part of the Missouri-Arkansas state line along the western side of the Missouri Bootheel.

Osage River one of the larger rivers in Missouri

The Osage River is a 276-mile-long (444 km) tributary of the Missouri River in central Missouri in the United States. The eighth-largest river in the state, it drains a mostly rural area of 15,300 square miles (40,000 km2). The watershed includes an area of east-central Kansas and a large portion of west-central and central Missouri, where it drains northwest areas of the Ozark Plateau.

Kasilof River river in the United States of America

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Lake of the Ozarks reservoir in Missouri, United States

Lake of the Ozarks is a reservoir created by impounding the Osage River in the northern part of the Ozarks in central Missouri. Parts of three smaller tributaries to the Osage are included in the impoundment: the Niangua River, Grandglaize Creek, and Gravois Creek. The lake has a surface area of 54,000 acres (220 km2) and 1,150 miles (1,850 km) of shoreline. The main channel of the Osage Arm stretches 92 miles (148 km) from end to end. The total drainage area is over 14,000 square miles (36,000 km2). The lake's serpentine shape has earned it the nickname "Puff The Magic Dragon", which has in turn inspired the names of local institutions such as The Magic Dragon Street Meet.

Hurricane Deck, Missouri unincorporated community in Missouri

Hurricane Deck is an unincorporated community in Camden County, Missouri, United States, on the Lake of the Ozarks. It is part of the lake's resort area, and according to one source is named for a tornado which struck the area, tornadoes once being called "hurricanes" locally.

The Osage Fork Gasconade River is a stream in Wright, Webster and Laclede counties in the Ozarks of southern Missouri. It is a tributary of the Gasconade River.

Ha Ha Tonka State Park

Ha Ha Tonka State Park is a public recreation area encompassing over 3,700 acres (1,500 ha) on the Niangua arm of the Lake of the Ozarks, about five miles south of Camdenton, Missouri, in the United States. The state park's most notable feature is the ruins of Ha Ha Tonka, an early 20th-century stone mansion that was modeled after European castles of the 16th century.

Pomme de Terre River (Missouri) river in Missouri

The Pomme de Terre River is a 130-mile-long (210 km) tributary of the Osage River in southwestern Missouri in the United States. Via the Osage and Missouri rivers, it is part of the watershed of the Mississippi River.

Little Niangua River river in the United States of America

The Little Niangua River is a 64.4-mile-long (103.6 km) tributary of the Niangua River in the Ozarks region of central Missouri in the United States. Via the Niangua, Osage and Missouri rivers, it is part of the watershed of the Mississippi River. The Little Niangua was so named for its smaller size relative to the Niangua River.

James River (Missouri) river in Missouri, United States

The James River is a 130-mile-long (210 km) river in southern Missouri. It flows from northeast Webster County until it is impounded into Table Rock Lake. It is part of the White River watershed. The river forms Lake Springfield and supplies drinking water for the city of Springfield.

Grandglaize Creek is a creek and tributary to the Osage River that forms the Grand Glaize Arm of the Lake of the Ozarks in Missouri. The creek flows for 10 miles (16 km) before reaching the Lake of the Ozarks, and the Grand Glaize Arm extends another 15 miles (24 km) before reaching the Osage River within the lake.

Russell Township, Camden County, Missouri Township in Missouri, United States

Russell Township is one of eleven townships in Camden County, Missouri, USA. As of the 2000 census, its population was 2,495.

The Kings River is a tributary of the White River. It rises in the Boston Mountains of Arkansas and flows northward for more than 90 miles into Table Rock Lake in Missouri. The Arkansas portion of the river is undammed and bordered by rural and forested land, the river is popular for paddling and sport fishing.

U.S. Route 54 in Missouri is a west-east highway that starts from the Kansas state line in Nevada to the Illinois state line in Louisiana.

Turkey Creek is a stream in Benton and Hickory counties in the U.S. state of Missouri. It is a tributary of the Osage River.

Dousinbury Creek is a stream in Dallas and Laclede counties in the Ozarks of southwest Missouri.

Mill Creek is a stream in northern Dallas County in the Ozarks of southwest Missouri. It is a tributary of the Niangua River.

Parks Creek is a stream in Wright and Laclede counties in the Ozarks of southern Missouri. It is a tributary of the Osage Fork Gasconade River.

Big Buffalo Creek is a stream in Morgan and Benton counties in west-central Missouri. It is a tributary of the Osage River within the Lake of the Ozarks.

References

  1. "Niangua River". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved 2015-12-03.
  2. "Water-Data Report 2012 - 06923950 Niangua River at Tunnel Dam near Macks Creek, MO" (PDF). U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved 2015-12-03.
  3. U.S. Geological Survey. National Hydrography Dataset high-resolution flowline data. The National Map, accessed May 31, 2011
  4. "Webster County Place Names, 1928–1945". The State Historical Society of Missouri. Archived from the original on June 24, 2016. Retrieved January 2, 2017.
  5. Eaton, David Wolfe (1918). How Missouri Counties, Towns and Streams Were Named. The State Historical Society of Missouri. p. 371.