Nigel Stock (actor)

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Nigel Stock
Actor Nigel Stock.jpg
Stock as Dr. Watson in BBC TV's Sherlock Holmes
Born21 September 1919
Died23 June 1986(1986-06-23) (aged 66)
Camden, London, England
OccupationActor
Years active1931–1986
Spouses
Catherine Hodnett
(m. 1943;div. 1947)
Sonia Williams
(m. 1951;div. 1980)
(m. 1979)
[1]

Nigel Stock (21 September 1919 – 23 June 1986) was a British actor who played character roles in many films and television dramas. He was perhaps best known for his stint as Dr. Watson in TV adaptations of the Sherlock Holmes stories, for his supporting roles as a solidly reliable English soldier or bureaucrat in several war and historical film dramas, and for playing the title role in Owen, M.D. [2]

Contents

Early life

Stock was born in Malta, the son of an Army captain. He grew up in India before attending St Paul's School, London and the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, where he earned the Leverhulme Exhibition, Northcliffe Scholarship, and the Principal's Medal. [3]

Military service

Stock served in the Second World War with the London Irish Rifles and the Assam Regiment of the Indian Army in Burma, China and Kohima. He was honourably discharged with the rank of Major, having twice been mentioned in dispatches. [3]

Acting

He made his stage debut in 1931, and during his career achieved numerous classical and contemporary credits at various distinguished theatres, including the Old Vic and on Broadway, with productions of The Winter's Tale , Macbeth , She Stoops to Conquer , Uncle Vanya . [4] [5] His start in films came with uncredited bit parts in The Man Who Could Work Miracles (1938) and Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1939). In 1937 he made his first credited film appearance in Lancashire Luck . [6]

After his wartime service, he returned to acting. His film appearances included popular releases such as Brighton Rock (1947), The Dam Busters (1955), Victim (1961), The Great Escape (1963), The Lion in Winter and The Lost Continent (both 1968), and Russian Roulette (1975). [7]

Between 1964 and 1968, Nigel Stock became a household name in the UK for his portrayal of Dr. Watson in a series of Sherlock Holmes dramas for BBC television. [8] Later in life, he portrayed the mentor of Sherlock Holmes in Young Sherlock Holmes . [4] His other numerous television credits included Danger Man (1965), The Avengers (1964 & 1966), The Prisoner (1967), The Doctors (1969–71), Owen, M.D. (1971–73), Quiller (1975), Van der Valk (1977), the Doctor Who serial Time Flight (1982), Yes Minister (1982), Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (1979) and for a BBC dramatisation of A Tale of Two Cities (1980) as well as The Pickwick Papers (1985) as Mr. Pickwick. [9] [10]

Stock and his third wife, Richenda Carey, had just appeared together on stage in the world premiere of Mumbo Jumbo in May 1986, when, on 23 June 1986, he died of a heart attack, aged 66. [9]

Personal life and death

Stock was married three times. He married his first wife, Catherine Hodnett, in 1943; the couple had one son and divorced in 1947. His second marriage was to Sonia Williams in 1951. They divorced in 1980 after having three children together. Stock's third marriage was to actress Richenda Carey in 1979. [1] They remained married until his death.

Stock was found dead of "natural causes" on Monday 23 June 1986 at his home in north London. He was 66 years old. [11]

Radio

Filmography

Film

YearTitleRoleNotes
1936 The Man Who Could Work Miracles Office Boyuncredited
1937 Lancashire Luck Joe Lovejoy
1938 Break the News Stage Boyuncredited
Luck of the Navy uncredited
1939 Goodbye, Mr. Chips John Forresteruncredited
Sons of the Sea Rudd
1947 It Always Rains on Sunday Ted Edwards
Brighton Rock Cubitt
1951 The Lady with a Lamp George Winch
1952 Derby Day Jim Molloy
1953 Appointment in London Co-Pilotuncredited
Malta Story Giuseppe Gonzar aka Ricardi
1954 Aunt Clara Charles Willis
1955 The Night My Number Came Up The Pilot
The Dam Busters Flying / Off. F. M. Spafford, D.F.C., D.F.M.
1956 Eyewitness Barney
The Battle of the River Plate Chief Officer, Tairoa, Prisoner on Graf Speeuncredited
1958 The Silent Enemy Able Seaman Fraser
1960 Never Let Go Regan
1961 Victim Phip
1962 H.M.S. Defiant Senior Midshipman Kilpatrick
The Password Is Courage Cole
1963 The Great Escape Flt. Lt. Dennis Cavendish "The Surveyor"
1964 Nothing but the Best Ferris
Weekend at Dunkirk Un soldat brûlé
The High Bright Sun Lt. Col. N. Park
1967 The Night of the Generals Otto
1968 The Lost Continent Dr. Webster
The Lion in Winter William Marshal
1970 Cromwell Sir Edward Hyde
1973 Bequest to the Nation George Matcham
1975 Russian Roulette Ferguson
Operation Daybreak General
1980 The Mirror Crack'd Inspector Gates'Murder at Midnight'
1983 Yellowbeard Admiral
1985 Young Sherlock Holmes Rupert T. Waxflatter

Television

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References

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  2. Paul Cornell; Martin Day; Keith Topping (1996). The Guinness Book of Classic British TV. Guinness. p. 17. ISBN   978-0-85112-628-9.
  3. 1 2 "Nigel Stock". Tv.com. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on 5 March 2016. Retrieved 6 June 2015.
  4. 1 2 Hal Erickson. "Nigel Stock – Biography, Movie Highlights and Photos – AllMovie". AllMovie.
  5. "Nigel Stock". Theatricalia.com. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 6 June 2015.
  6. "Lancashire Luck (1937) – Henry Cass – Cast and Crew – AllMovie". AllMovie.
  7. "Nigel Stock". British Film Institute . Archived from the original on 13 July 2012.
  8. "British Actor Nigel Stock dies". Montreal Gazette. 25 June 1986.
  9. 1 2 "Nigel Stock". Tv.com. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on 21 December 2015. Retrieved 6 June 2015.
  10. "Nigel Stock". Aveleyman.com.
  11. "Nigel Stock". The New York Times . Reuters. 24 June 1986. Retrieved 27 December 2020.