Nisan

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Adar       Nisan (נִיסָן)       Iyar
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Tu Bishvat

Passover, the Festival of the Unleavened Bread,
begins on the 15th of Nisan and commemorates
the Israelites' liberation from Egyptian slavery.
Month number:1
Number of days:30
Season:Spring
Gregorian equivalent:March–April

Nisan (or Nissan; Hebrew : נִיסָן, Standard Nisan Tiberian Nîsān) in the Hebrew calendar is the first month of the ecclesiastical year and the seventh month (eighth, in leap year) of the civil year. In the Torah it is called the month of the Aviv (e.g. Book of Exodus, 13:4 בְּחֹ֖דֶשׁ הָאָבִֽיבḥōḏeš hā-’āḇîḇ). It is a spring month of 30 days. Nisan usually falls in March–April on the Gregorian calendar. In the Book of Esther in the Tanakh it is referred to as Nisan. Karaite Jews interpret it as referring to the month in which barley was ripe.

Contents

Name

The name of the month is an Akkadian language borrowing, although ultimately originates in Sumerian nisag "first fruits". The current, non-biblical Jewish month names were adopted during the Babylonian captivity. In the Babylonian calendar its name was Araḫ Nisānu, the "month of beginning". [1]

Holidays and observances

In Jewish history and tradition

Other uses

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Kislev month of the Hebrew calendar

Kislev is the third month of the civil year and the ninth month of the ecclesiastical year on the Hebrew calendar. In the Babylonian calendar its name was Araḫ Kislimu.

Adar month of the Hebrew calendar

Adar is the sixth month of the civil year and the twelfth month of the ecclesiastical year on the Hebrew calendar, roughly corresponding to the month of March in the Gregorian calendar. It is a winter month of 29 days. The key Purim-related liberating wartime events and main mention of the month appear in the holy scripture of Esther 9, its last book.

Purim Jewish holiday

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<i>Av</i> Month of the Hebrew calendar

Av is the eleventh month of the civil year and the fifth month of the ecclesiastical year on the Hebrew calendar. The name comes from Araḫ Abu, "month of Abu", from the Babylonian calendar and appeared in the Talmud around the 3rd century. It is one of several months which are not explicitly named in the Hebrew Bible (Tanakh). It is a summer month of 30 days. Av usually occurs in July–August on the Gregorian calendar.

Iyar month of the Hebrew calendar

Iyar is the eighth month of the civil year and the second month of the Jewish religious year on the Hebrew calendar. The name is Babylonian in origin. It is a spring month of 29 days. Iyar usually falls in April–May on the Gregorian calendar.

Tevet month of the Hebrew calendar

Tevet is the fourth month of the civil year and the tenth month of the ecclesiastical year on the Hebrew calendar. It follows Kislev and precedes Shevat. It is a winter month of 29 days. Tevet usually occurs in December–January on the Gregorian calendar. In the Babylonian calendar its name was Araḫ Ṭebētum, the "muddy month".

Tishrei month of the Hebrew calendar

Tishrei ; from Akkadian tašrītu "Beginning", from šurrû "To begin") is the first month of the civil year and the seventh month of the ecclesiastical year in the Hebrew calendar. The name of the month is Babylonian. It is an autumn month of 30 days. Tishrei usually occurs in September–October on the Gregorian calendar.

Cheshvan month of the Hebrew calendar

Marcheshvan, sometimes shortened to Cheshvan, is the second month of the civil year, and the eighth month of the ecclesiastical year on the Hebrew calendar.

<i>Sivan</i> month of the Hebrew calendar

Siban is the ninth month of the civil year and the third month of the ecclesiastical year on the Hebrew calendar. It is a spring month of 30 days. Sivan usually falls in May–June on the Gregorian calendar.

Tammuz (Hebrew month) Month of the Hebrew calendar

Tammuz, or Tamuz, is the tenth month of the civil year and the fourth month of the ecclesiastical year on the Hebrew calendar, and the modern Assyrian calendar. It is a boreal summer month of 29 days, which occurs on the Gregorian calendar around June–July.

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Ki Tissa

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Emor

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Pinechas (parsha)

Pinechas, Pinchas, Pinhas, or Pin'has is the 41st weekly Torah portion in the annual Jewish cycle of Torah reading and the eighth in the Book of Numbers. It tells of Phinehas's killing of a couple, ending a plague, and of the daughters of Zelophehad's successful plea for land rights. It constitutes Numbers 25:10–30:1. The parashah is made up of 7,853 Hebrew letters, 1,887 Hebrew words, 168 verses, and 280 lines in a Torah scroll.

Esther in rabbinic literature

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Gimmel Tammuz is the third day of Tammuz, which is the tenth month in the Hebrew year counting from Tishrei, and the fourth month counting from Nisan.

The earliest known precursor to Hebrew is an inscription in Ancient Hebrew is the Khirbet Qeiyafa Inscription, if it can indeed be considered Hebrew at that early a stage. By far the most varied, extensive and historically significant body of literature written in the old Classical Hebrew is the canon of the Hebrew Bible, but certain other works have survived as well. It was not unusual for ancient narratives, poetry and rules to have been transmitted orally for several generations before being committed to writing. Before the Aramaic-derived modern Hebrew alphabet was adopted circa the 5th century BCE, the Phoenician-derived Paleo-Hebrew script was used instead for writing, and a derivative of the script still survives to this day in the form of the Samaritan script.

References

  1. Muss-Arnolt, W., [www.jstor.org/stable/3259081 The Names of the Assyro-Babylonian Months and Their Regents], Journal of Biblical Literature Vol. 11, No. 1 (1892), pp. 72–94 [76], accessed 10 Aug. 2020
  2. Megillat Ta'anit, fast days; Targum Yonaton, Nu. 20:1.
  3. http://www.ou.org/judaism-101/bh-yom-yom/nissan/
  4. (Nisan before Torah, Genesis 8:4, Exodus 12:1)
  5. "Bamberg". Jewish Encyclopedia. Retrieved 30 April 2014.