Noah M. Mason

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Noah Morgan Mason
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Noah M. Mason
Member of the U.S.HouseofRepresentatives
from Illinois's 12th district
In office
January 3, 1937 January 3, 1949
Preceded by John T. Buckbee
Succeeded by Edgar A. Jonas
Member of the U.S.HouseofRepresentatives
from Illinois's 15th district
In office
January 3, 1949 January 3, 1963
Preceded by Robert B. Chiperfield
Succeeded by Charlotte T. Reid
Member of the Illinois Senate
In office
1930–1936
Personal details
Born(1882-07-19)July 19, 1882
Glamorganshire, Wales
DiedMarch 29, 1965(1965-03-29) (aged 82)
Joliet, Illinois, U.S.
Resting placePlainfield Cemetery, Plainfield, Illinois, U.S.
Political party Republican

Noah Morgan Mason (July 19, 1882 – March 29, 1965) was a U.S. Representative from Illinois. A conservative Republican, he served 13 terms representing first the state's 12th congressional district and then, after a redrawing of boundaries, the 15th.

United States House of Representatives lower house of the United States Congress

The United States House of Representatives is the lower house of the United States Congress, the Senate being the upper house. Together they compose the national legislature of the United States.

Illinois State of the United States of America

Illinois is a state in the Midwestern and Great Lakes regions of the United States. It has the fifth largest gross domestic product (GDP), the sixth largest population, and the 25th largest land area of all U.S. states. Illinois has been noted as a microcosm of the entire United States. With Chicago in northeastern Illinois, small industrial cities and immense agricultural productivity in the north and center of the state, and natural resources such as coal, timber, and petroleum in the south, Illinois has a diverse economic base, and is a major transportation hub. Chicagoland, Chicago's metropolitan area, encompasses over 65% of the state's population. The Port of Chicago connects the state to international ports via two main routes: from the Great Lakes, via the Saint Lawrence Seaway, to the Atlantic Ocean and from the Great Lakes to the Mississippi River, via the Illinois Waterway to the Illinois River. The Mississippi River, the Ohio River, and the Wabash River form parts of the boundaries of Illinois. For decades, Chicago's O'Hare International Airport has been ranked as one of the world's busiest airports. Illinois has long had a reputation as a bellwether both in social and cultural terms and, through the 1980s, in politics.

Conservatism in the United States Conservatism in the United States

Conservatism in the United States is a broad system of political beliefs in the United States that is characterized by respect for American traditions, republicanism, support for Judeo-Christian values, moral universalism, pro-business and anti-labor, anti-communism, individualism, advocacy of American exceptionalism, and a defense of Western culture from the perceived threats posed by socialism, authoritarianism, and moral relativism. Liberty is a core value, as it is with all major American parties. American conservatives consider individual liberty—within the bounds of American values—as the fundamental trait of democracy; this perspective contrasts with that of modern American liberals, who generally place a greater value on equality and social justice and emphasize the need for state intervention to achieve these goals. American conservatives believe in limiting government in size and scope, and in a balance between national government and states' rights. Apart from some libertarians, they tend to favor strong action in areas they believe to be within government's legitimate jurisdiction, particularly national defense and law enforcement. Social conservatives oppose abortion and same-sex marriage, while privileging traditional marriage and supporting Christian prayer in public schools.

Contents

Mason was a conservative Republican who represented a rural downstate district. Less flamboyant and less visible than his colleague Everett McKinley Dirksen, he ardently supported states' rights in order to minimize the federal role, for he feared federal regulation of business. He also favored higher tariffs to protect American business and workers, a position that was increasingly unsupported by the wider Republican Party. He distrusted Roosevelt, and made many speeches against high federal spending. He called out New Dealers, such as Eveline Burns, Henry A. Wallace, Adolph A. Berle, Jr., and Paul Porter, as socialists, and suggested their policies resembled fascism. He was a member of the House Un-American Activities Committee (1938–43), and in 1950 he championed Joe McCarthy's exposes. [1] During the Eisenhower administration, while praising the Republican president, he opposed substantially all his initiatives, including statehood for Hawaii, and he supported Senator Pat McCarran in sharply restricting immigration to the US. [2] He advocated a radical rewriting of the tax code. [2] [3]

In American political discourse, states' rights are political powers held for the state governments rather than the federal government according to the United States Constitution, reflecting especially the enumerated powers of Congress and the Tenth Amendment. The enumerated powers that are listed in the Constitution include exclusive federal powers, as well as concurrent powers that are shared with the states, and all of those powers are contrasted with the reserved powers—also called states' rights—that only the states possess.

Franklin D. Roosevelt 32nd president of the United States

Franklin Delano Roosevelt, often referred to by initials FDR, was an American statesman and political leader who served as the 32nd president of the United States from 1933 until his death in 1945. A member of the Democratic Party, he won a record four presidential elections and became a central figure in world events during the first half of the 20th century. Roosevelt directed the federal government during most of the Great Depression, implementing his New Deal domestic agenda in response to the worst economic crisis in U.S. history. As a dominant leader of his party, he built the New Deal Coalition, which realigned American politics into the Fifth Party System and defined American liberalism throughout the middle third of the 20th century. His third and fourth terms were dominated by World War II, which ended shortly after he died in office. Though he has been subject to substantial criticism, he is generally rated by scholars as one of the three greatest U.S. presidents, along with George Washington and Abraham Lincoln.

The New Deal coalition was the alignment of interest groups and voting blocs in the United States that supported the New Deal and voted for Democratic presidential candidates from 1932 until the late 1960s. It made the Democratic Party the majority party during that period, losing only to Dwight D. Eisenhower, a pro-New Deal Republican, in 1952 and 1956. Franklin D. Roosevelt forged a coalition that included the Democratic state party organizations, city machines, labor unions, blue collar workers, minorities, farmers, white Southerners, people on relief, and intellectuals. The coalition began to fall apart with the bitter factionalism during the 1968 election, but it remains the model that party activists seek to replicate.

Career

Born in Glamorganshire, Wales, the 12th of 13 children, Mason immigrated to the United States in 1888 with his parents, who settled in La Salle, Illinois; his father was a coal miner and then a farmer. He left school at 14 to help on the farm, but at his mother's urging [2] attended Dixon College, and graduated from the Illinois State Normal University at Normal.

Dixon College or Dixon Business College was a private college in Dixon, Illinois, USA. It operated together with Northern Illinois Normal School, a teacher training institution, from 1881 until some time after 1914.

He was a teacher and principal of schools at Oglesby, Illinois from 1902 to 1905 and was superintendent of schools from 1908 to 1936. From 1918 to 1926 he was also an Oglesby city commissioner. He served as a member of the Illinois State Normal School Board from 1926 to 1930.

Oglesby, Illinois City in Illinois, United States

Oglesby is a city in LaSalle County, Illinois, United States. The population was 3,791 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Ottawa–Streator Micropolitan Statistical Area.

Mason served in the Illinois state senate from 1930 to 1936, and was then elected as a Republican to the 75th United States Congress and was reelected to the twelve succeeding Congresses (January 3, 1937 – January 3, 1963). He served on the Ways and Means Committee, where he was part of the conservative bloc. [2] [4]

75th United States Congress 1937–1939 U.S. Congress

The Seventy-fifth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, DC from January 3, 1937, to January 3, 1939, during the first two years of the second administration of U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt.. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Fifteenth United States Census, conducted in 1930. Both chambers had a Democratic supermajority.

He was not a candidate for renomination in 1962 for the Eighty-eighth Congress. He retired and lived in Plainfield, Illinois. He died in Joliet, Illinois, and was buried in Plainfield Cemetery in Plainfield.

88th United States Congress 1963–1965 U.S. Congress

The Eighty-eighth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from January 3, 1963, to January 3, 1965, during the last year of the administration of U.S. President John F. Kennedy, and the first of the administration of his successor, U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson. The apportionment of seats in this House of Representatives was based on the Eighteenth Census of the United States in 1960, and the number of members was again 435. Both chambers had a Democratic majority.

Plainfield, Illinois Village in Illinois, United States

Plainfield is a village in Will and Kendall counties, Illinois, United States. The population was 39,581 at the 2010 census and an estimated 43,926 in 2017.

Joliet, Illinois City in Illinois, United States

Joliet is a city in Will and Kendall counties in the U.S. state of Illinois, 30 miles (48 km) southwest of Chicago. It is the county seat of Will County and a major part of the southwest Chicago metropolitan area. At the 2010 census, the city was the fourth largest in Illinois, with a population of 147,433. A population estimate in 2018 put Joliet's population at 150,495, which would make it the 3rd largest city in Illinois if accurate.

See also

DodgerBlue flag waving.svg Conservatismportal

Notes

  1. Jack A. Samosky, "Congressman Noah Morgan Mason: Illinois' Conservative Spokesman", Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, March 1983, Vol. 76 Issue 1, pp. 35-48.
  2. 1 2 3 4 Joseph and Stewart Alsop, "Mason Symbolizes Ike's Problem", St. Petersburg Times , June 30, 1953, p. 6.
  3. "Noah Mason", The Pittsburgh Press , March 31, 1965, p. 26.
  4. Edmond LeBreton, Associated Press, "Ways And Means Committee May Make, Break Key Projects", The Florence Times , November 15, 1962, sec. 3, p. 4.

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References

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress website http://bioguide.congress.gov .

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
John T. Buckbee
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Illinois's 12th congressional district

January 3, 1937 - January 3, 1949
Succeeded by
Edgar A. Jonas
Preceded by
Robert B. Chiperfield
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Illinois's 15th congressional district

January 3, 1949 - January 3, 1963
Succeeded by
Charlotte T. Reid