Norman Kirk

Last updated

Related Research Articles

The New Zealand Labour Party, or simply Labour, is a centre-left political party in New Zealand. The party's platform programme describes its founding principle as democratic socialism, while observers describe Labour as social-democratic and pragmatic in practice. The party participates in the international Progressive Alliance. It is one of two major political parties in New Zealand, alongside its traditional rival, the National Party.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Keith Holyoake</span> Prime minister of New Zealand in 1957

Sir Keith Jacka Holyoake, was the 26th prime minister of New Zealand, serving for a brief period in 1957 and then from 1960 to 1972, and also the 13th governor-general of New Zealand, serving from 1977 to 1980. He is the only New Zealand politician to date to have held both positions.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Walter Nash</span> Prime minister of New Zealand from 1957 to 1960

Sir Walter Nash was a New Zealand politician who served as the 27th prime minister of New Zealand in the Second Labour Government from 1957 to 1960. He is noted for his long period of political service, having been associated with the New Zealand Labour Party since its creation.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Jack Marshall</span> Prime minister of New Zealand in 1972

Sir John Ross Marshall was a New Zealand politician of the National Party. He entered Parliament in 1946 and was first promoted to Cabinet in 1951. After spending twelve years as the deputy prime minister of New Zealand, he served as the 28th prime minister from February until December 1972.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Arnold Nordmeyer</span> New Zealand politician

Sir Arnold Henry Nordmeyer was a New Zealand politician. He served as Minister of Finance (1957–1960) and later as Leader of the Labour Party and Leader of the Opposition (1963–1965).

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Bill Rowling</span> Prime minister of New Zealand from 1974 to 1975

Sir Wallace Edward Rowling, commonly known as Bill Rowling, was a New Zealand politician who was the 30th prime minister of New Zealand from 1974 to 1975. He held office as the parliamentary leader of the Labour Party.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1975 New Zealand general election</span> General election in New Zealand

The 1975 New Zealand general election was held on 29 November to elect MPs to the 38th session of the New Zealand Parliament. It was the first general election in New Zealand where 18- to 20-year-olds and all permanent residents of New Zealand were eligible to vote, although only citizens were able to be elected.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Hugh Watt</span> New Zealand politician

Hugh Watt was a New Zealand politician who was a Labour member of Parliament and the acting prime minister of New Zealand between 31 August and 6 September 1974, following the death of Prime Minister Norman Kirk. He had been the fifth deputy prime minister of New Zealand since 8 December 1972. Watt later served as high commissioner to the United Kingdom.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Third Labour Government of New Zealand</span>

The Third Labour Government of New Zealand was the government of New Zealand from 1972 to 1975. During its time in office, it carried out a wide range of reforms in areas such as overseas trade, farming, public works, energy generation, local government, health, the arts, sport and recreation, regional development, environmental protection, education, housing, and social welfare. Māori also benefited from revisions to the laws relating to land, together with a significant increase in a Māori and Island Affairs building programme. In addition, the government encouraged biculturalism and a sense of New Zealand identity. However, the government damaged relations between Pākehā and Pasifika New Zealanders by instituting the Dawn Raids on alleged overstayers from the Pacific Islands; the raids have been described as "the most blatantly racist attack on Pacific peoples by the New Zealand government in New Zealand’s history". The government lasted for one term before being defeated a year after the death of its popular leader, Norman Kirk.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Black Budget (New Zealand)</span> 1958 budget with unpopular taxes increases

In New Zealand, the term Black Budget refers to the government budget of 26 June 1958, in which Minister of Finance Arnold Nordmeyer increased taxes on beer, tobacco, cars and petrol.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Second National Government of New Zealand</span>

The Second National Government of New Zealand was the government of New Zealand from 1960 to 1972. It was a conservative government which sought mainly to preserve the economic prosperity and general stability of the early 1960s. It was one of New Zealand's longest-serving governments.

Dame Lucy Ruth Kirk was a New Zealand prominent anti-abortion campaigner. Her husband was New Zealand's 29th Prime Minister, Norman Kirk.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Robert Macfarlane (New Zealand politician)</span> New Zealand politician (1900-1981)

Sir Robert Mafeking Macfarlane was a New Zealand politician of the Labour Party. He was a Member of Parliament, served as Speaker of the House of Representatives and was a Mayor of Christchurch.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Warren Freer</span> New Zealand politician

Warren Wilfred Freer was a New Zealand politician and member of the Labour Party. He represented the Mount Albert electorate from 1947 to 1981.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Colin Moyle</span> New Zealand politician

Colin James Moyle is a former politician of the New Zealand Labour Party who served as a Member of Parliament (MP) from 1963 to 1976 and again from 1981 to 1990. He was a Government minister in the Third Labour and Fourth Labour Governments. He was a close confidant of Bill Rowling during Rowling's short premiership. In the Fourth Labour Government, as Minister of Agriculture, Moyle oversaw the removal of farming subsidies and the establishment of a fisheries quota system.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Bill Fraser (New Zealand politician)</span> New Zealand politician

William Alex Fraser was a New Zealand politician of the Labour Party.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">37th New Zealand Parliament</span>

The 37th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand Parliament. It was elected at the 1972 general election on 25 November of that year.

The 1965 New Zealand Labour Party leadership election was held on 9 December 1965 to determine the future leadership of the New Zealand Labour Party. The election was won by Lyttelton MP Norman Kirk.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1974 New Zealand Labour Party leadership election</span>

The 1974 New Zealand Labour Party leadership election was held on 6 September 1974 to determine the eighth leader of the New Zealand Labour Party. The election was won by Tasman MP Bill Rowling.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Death of Norman Kirk</span>

On 31 August 1974, Norman Kirk, the 29th Prime Minister of New Zealand, died unexpectedly after a period of poor health. He was just 51 years old. The death led to an outpouring of grief, and damaged the Labour Party so severely that they lost the 1975 election in a wipeout. His state funeral was held on 4 September 1974.

References

  1. Ross, Ken (2015). "Norman Kirk's 'OE'". New Zealand International Review. 40 (5): 18–21. ISSN   0110-0262.
  2. 1 2 "Norman Kirk – The Mighty Totara". Stuff.co.nz . 10 March 2014. Retrieved 29 December 2017.
  3. "Australia and New Zealand Set Moves Against French A‐Tests". The New York Times. 24 January 1973. ISSN   0362-4331 . Retrieved 19 June 2022.
  4. "At the break of dawn". Auckland Museum. Retrieved 16 June 2022.
  5. "The dawn raids: causes, impacts and legacy". nzhistory.govt.nz. Retrieved 16 June 2022.
  6. Mitchell, James (July 2003). Immigration and National Identity in 1970s New Zealand (PDF) (PhD). University of Otago. Retrieved 8 January 2022.
  7. Andrews, George (1 August 2020). "The famous words that Norman Kirk did not say". The Spinoff. Retrieved 1 August 2020.
  8. "Election essay: The town that's used to being disappointed". BBC News. 23 March 2015. Retrieved 23 March 2015.
  9. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Bassett, Michael. "Kirk, Norman Eric". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography . Ministry for Culture and Heritage . Retrieved 8 November 2012.
  10. 1 2 Taonga, New Zealand Ministry for Culture and Heritage Te Manatu. "Kirk, Norman Eric". teara.govt.nz. Retrieved 19 June 2022.
  11. "Norman Kirk First Maori Prime Minister Riddle - MSC NewsWire". www.mscnewswire.co.nz. Retrieved 19 June 2022.
  12. Malone, Audrey (19 May 2018). "Labour's Jo Luxton 'between two worlds'". Stuff. Retrieved 19 June 2022.
  13. says, gCaisle. "1974: Kirk Out". Anarchist History of New Zealand. Retrieved 19 June 2022.
  14. Buckingham, Louise (1 January 1840). "Papers relating to Norman Kirk's ancestry". Papers relating to Norman Kirk's ance... | Items | National Library of New Zealand | National Library of New Zealand. Retrieved 19 June 2022.
  15. 1 2 3 Bassett, Michael. "Norman Kirk Official Biography – Archives New Zealand. Te Rua Mahara o te Kāwanatanga". archives.govt.nz. Retrieved 29 December 2017.
  16. Hall, Sarah (18 December 2022). "50 years on: Norman Kirk's Big Legacy". North & South Magazine. Retrieved 26 December 2022.
  17. "Kiwis who left their mark on the nation". The New Zealand Herald . 30 December 2000. Retrieved 1 November 2011.
  18. "Rating enquiry – 12 Carew Street, Kaiapoi – Waimakariri District Council" . Retrieved 20 September 2010.[ permanent dead link ]
  19. "Norman Kirk's House (Former)". Register of Historic Places. Heritage New Zealand . Retrieved 20 September 2010.
  20. Broun, Britton (11 October 2010). "Porirua's new mayor New Zealand's youngest". Dominion Post. Retrieved 29 October 2010.
  21. "Labour's Selection for Lyttelton Seat". The Evening Post . 18 July 1957. p. 18.
  22. "Growing Stature of Young MP". The Evening Post . 4 May 1963.
  23. "Labour Party Makes Its Choice – Mr Watt New Deputy Leader". The Evening Post . 30 April 1963.
  24. Grant 2014, p. 152.
  25. Bassett, Michael (2000). "Kirk, Norman Eric". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Retrieved 24 February 2018.
  26. 1 2 "General elections 1890–1993". Electoral Commission. Archived from the original on 30 December 2015. Retrieved 24 February 2018.
  27. 1 2 "1972 – key events". Ministry for Culture and Heritage. 23 January 2015. Retrieved 24 February 2018.
  28. 1 2 McLean, Gavin (8 November 2017). "Norman Kirk". Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 24 February 2018.
  29. 1 2 Aimer, Peter (1 June 2015). "Labour Party – Second and third Labour governments". Te Ara – the Encyclopedia of New Zealand. Retrieved 24 February 2018.
  30. Ross, Ken. “Norman Kirk’s ‘OE.’” New Zealand International Review, vol. 40, no. 5, 2015, pp. 18–21. JSTOR, https://www.jstor.org/stable/48551803. Accessed 19 Jun. 2022.
  31. "Obituaries — Hon (Edward) Gough Whitlam AC, QC - New Zealand Parliament". www.parliament.nz. Retrieved 19 June 2022.
  32. Ross, Ken (2015). "Norman Kirk's 'OE'". New Zealand International Review. 40 (5): 18–21. ISSN   0110-0262.
  33. Mururoa Nuclear Tests, RNZN protest Veterans Archived 23 July 2011 at the Wayback Machine
  34. Disarmament and Security Centre – Publications – Papers Archived 13 February 2009 at the Wayback Machine
  35. "Stopping the 1973 tour". Ministry for Culture and Heritage. 13 August 2014. Retrieved 24 February 2018.
  36. Peaslee, Amos J. (1985). Constitutions of Nations (Rev. 4th ed.). Dordrecht: Nijhoff. p. 882. ISBN   9789024729050.
  37. Grant 2014, p. 237.
  38. Mitchell, James (July 2003). Immigration and National Identity in 1970s New Zealand (PDF) (PhD). University of Otago. Retrieved 8 January 2022.
  39. 1 2 Grant 2014, p. 24.
  40. Freer 2004, pp. 113, 195.
  41. Grant 2014, pp. 380–1, 389–400.
  42. Henderson, John. "Rowling, Wallace Edward". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography . Ministry for Culture and Heritage . Retrieved 29 August 2020.
  43. "Parliamentary Debates". Hansard. New Zealand Parliament, House of Representatives. 23 April 1975.
  44. Grant 2014, p. 403.
  45. Phillips 2014, pp. 114–117, 153–156.
  46. Grant 2014, pp. 405–417.
  47. Hunt, Tom (25 August 2012). "A nation mourned when we lost Big Norm". The Dominion Post . Retrieved 24 February 2018.

Bibliography

Further reading

  • Clark, Margaret, ed. (2001). Three Labour Leaders: Nordmeyer, Kirk, Rowling. Palmerston North: Dunmore Press. ISBN   0-86469-394-X.
  • Garnier, Tony; Kohn, Bruce; Booth, Pat (1978). The Hunter and the Hill : New Zealand politics in the Kirk years. Auckland: Cassell. OCLC   5288883.
  • Hayward, Margaret (1981). Diary of the Kirk Years. Auckland: Reed Publishing. ISBN   0589013505.
Norman Kirk
Norman Kirk, crop.jpg
Kirk in 1966
29th Prime Minister of New Zealand
In office
8 December 1972 31 August 1974
Government offices
Preceded by Prime Minister of New Zealand
1972–1974
Succeeded by
New Zealand Parliament
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Lyttelton
1957–1969
Succeeded by
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Sydenham
1969–1974
Succeeded by
Political offices
Preceded by
Owen Hills
Mayor of Kaiapoi
1953–1958
Succeeded by
Charles Thomas Williams
Party political offices
Preceded by President of the Labour Party
1964–1966
Succeeded by
Preceded by Leader of the Labour Party
1965–1974
Succeeded by