North Carolina pound

Last updated
North Carolina pound
US-Colonial (NC-33)-North Carolina-27 Nov 1729 OBV.jpg US-Colonial (NC-33)-North Carolina-27 Nov 1729 REV.jpg
North-Carolina £3 banknote (obverse)North-Carolina £3 banknote (reverse)
Denominations
Plural pounds
Symbol £
Banknotes
Freq. used£1, £2, £5
Rarely used£3
CoinsNone
Demographics
User(s) North-Carolina
Issuance
Central bank North-Carolina Treasury
Valuation
Pegged with pound sterling at par

The North Carolina pound (symbol: £ ), commonly known as the pound, was the currency of North-Carolina until 1793. Initially, the British pound circulated, supplemented from 1709 by local paper money and the introduction of Colonial currency and the Pound denominations in 1712. [1] Although these notes were denominated in pounds, shillings and pence, they were worth less than sterling, with 1 North Carolina shilling = 9 pence sterling. The first issue of paper money was known as "Old Tenor" money. In 1748, "New Tenor" paper money was introduced, worth 7½ times the Old Tenor notes. [2]

The pound sign (£) is the symbol for the pound sterling – the currency of the United Kingdom and previously of Great Britain and of the Kingdom of England. The same symbol is used for other currencies called pound, such as the Gibraltar pound, the Egyptian pound, and the Syrian pound. A similar symbol () is sometimes used for currencies named lira, for example the (withdrawn) Italian lira.

North Carolina U.S. state in the United States

North Carolina is a state located in the southeastern region of the United States. North Carolina is the 28th largest and 9th-most populous of the 50 United States. It is bordered by Virginia to the north, the Atlantic Ocean to the east, Georgia and South Carolina to the south, and Tennessee to the west. Raleigh is the state's capital and Charlotte is its largest city. The Charlotte metropolitan area, with an estimated population of 2,569,213 in 2018, is the most populous metropolitan area in North Carolina, the 23rd-most populous in the United States, and the largest banking center in the nation after New York City. North Carolina's second largest metropolitan area is the Raleigh metropolitan area, with an estimated population of 1,337,331 in 2018, and is home to the largest research park in the United States, Research Triangle Park, in Chapel Hill, Durham, and Raleigh.

Pound sterling Official currency of the United Kingdom and other territories

The pound sterling, commonly known as the pound and less commonly referred to as sterling, is the official currency of the United Kingdom, Jersey, Guernsey, the Isle of Man, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, the British Antarctic Territory, and Tristan da Cunha. It is subdivided into 100 pence. A number of nations that do not use sterling also have currencies called the pound.

The State of North Carolina issued Continental currency denominated in £sd and Spanish dollars, with 1 dollar = 8 shillings (the York rating). The continental currency was replaced by the U.S. dollar at a rate of 1000 continental dollars = 1 U.S. dollar.[ citation needed ]

Spanish dollar Former coin of the Spanish Empire

The Spanish dollar, also known as the piece of eight or the peso, is a silver coin of approximately 38 mm (1.5 in) diameter worth eight Spanish reales. It was minted in the Spanish Empire following a monetary reform in 1497.

The York rating was a valuation of the Spanish dollar in the £sd accounting system. It set the dollar equal to 8 shillings. The rating was named after the colony of New York where it was adopted. It was also used in Upper Canada by United Empire Loyalists following the American War of Independence.

Notes

  1. Newman, 2008, p. 313.
  2. Newman, 2008, p. 316.

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Australian pound currency of Australia from 1910 until 14 February 1966

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Connecticut pound

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The pound was the currency of Georgia until 1793. Initially, the British pound circulated. This was supplemented from 1735 with local paper money denominated in sterling, with 1 pound = 20 shillings = 240 pence.

The pound was the currency of Maryland until 1793. Initially, the British pound circulated along with foreign coins. From 1733, this was supplemented by paper money, known as "Proclamation Money", denominated in pounds, shillings and pence, but worth less than sterling, with 1 Maryland shilling = 9 pence sterling. A second "New" issue of notes was introduced in 1751, replacing the earlier notes at a rate of 1 New shilling = 1¼ Proclamation shillings.

Massachusetts pound currency of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and its colonial predecessors until 1793

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The pound was the currency of New Hampshire until 1793. Initially, the British pound circulated, supplemented from 1709 by local paper money. These notes were denominated in pounds, shillings and pence but were worth less than sterling, with 1 New Hampshire shilling = 9 pence sterling. This first issue of paper money was known as the "Old Tenor" issue.

New Jersey pound

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Pennsylvania pound currency of Pennsylvania until 1793

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Rhode Island pound currency of Rhode Island until 1793

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South Carolina pound currency of South Carolina until 1793

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Virginia pound currency of Virginia until 1793

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The history of currency in the British colony of Grenada closely follows that of the British Eastern Caribbean territories in general. Even though Queen Anne's proclamation of 1704 brought the gold standard to the West Indies, silver pieces of eight continued to form a major portion of the circulating currency right into the latter half of the nineteenth century.

The history of currency in the British colony of St. Kitts closely follows that of the British Eastern Caribbean territories in general. Even though Queen Anne's proclamation of 1704 brought the gold standard to the West Indies, silver pieces of eight continued to form a major portion of the circulating currency right into the latter half of the nineteenth century.

The history of currency in the British colony of Saint Lucia closely follows that of the British Eastern Caribbean territories in general. Even though Queen Anne's proclamation of 1704 brought the gold standard to the West Indies, silver pieces of eight continued to form a major portion of the circulating currency right into the latter half of the nineteenth century.

The pound was the currency of Prince Edward Island until 1871. It was subdivided into 20 shillings, each of 12 pence. It was replaced by the dollar in 1871. British coins circulated, together with locally produced coins and paper money.

References

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