North Clyde Line

Last updated

North Clyde Line
Dumbarton River Leven rail bridge 334018 334034.jpg
A Class 334 crosses the River Leven between Dumbarton Central and Dalreoch
Overview
StatusOperational
Owner Network Rail
Locale Glasgow
Edinburgh
Scotland
TerminiWest
Helensburgh Central
Balloch
Dalmuir
Milngavie
East
Cumbernauld
Airdrie
Bathgate
Edinburgh Waverley
Stations57 (including Cumbernauld line)
Service
Type Heavy rail
System National Rail
Operator(s) ScotRail Trains
Rolling stock Class 334 "Juniper"
Class 320
Class 318
Technical
Number of tracks Double track
Track gauge 1,435 mm (4 ft 8+12 in)
Electrification 25 kV 50 Hz AC
Operating speedMax 90 mph (145 km/h)
North Clyde Line
Helensburgh Central
BSicon KBHFa.svg
BSicon KHSTa.svg
Balloch
Craigendoran
BSicon HST.svg
BSicon HST.svg
Alexandria
Cardross
BSicon HST.svg
BSicon HST.svg
Renton
BSicon KRWg+l.svg
BSicon KRWr.svg
BSicon HST.svg
Dalreoch
BSicon BHF.svg
Dumbarton Central
(for West Highland Line)
BSicon HST.svg
Dumbarton East
BSicon HST.svg
Bowling
BSicon HST.svg
Kilpatrick
BSicon HST.svg
Dalmuir
BSicon v-SHI2gr.svg
BSicon dSTRc2.svg
BSicon lMKRZ2+4o.svg
BSicon vSHI2l-.svg
BSicon v-STR3.svg
Clydebank
BSicon dHST+1.svg
BSicon dSTRc4.svg
BSicon dHST.svg
Singer
BSicon STR.svg
BSicon HST.svg
Drumry
Yoker
BSicon HST.svg
BSicon HST.svg
Drumchapel
BSicon STR.svg
BSicon STR.svg
BSicon KHSTa.svg
Milngavie
Garscadden
BSicon HST.svg
BSicon STR.svg
BSicon HST.svg
Hillfoot
BSicon STR.svg
BSicon STR.svg
BSicon HST.svg
Bearsden
Scotstounhill
BSicon HST.svg
BSicon KRWg+l.svg
BSicon KRWr.svg
BSicon STR.svg
BSicon HST.svg
Westerton
Jordanhill
BSicon HST.svg
BSicon HST.svg
Anniesland
(for Maryhill Line)
BSicon KRWl.svg
BSicon KRWg+r.svg
BSicon BHF.svg
Hyndland
BSicon INT.svg
Partick Glasgow Subway.svg
Finnieston W. Junction
Finnieston E. Junction
BSicon dSTRc2.svg
BSicon dSTR3.svg
BSicon lv-KRZu+F.svg
BSicon vSHI2gl-.svg
BSicon dCONTfaq-.svg
BSicon td-CONTgq.svg
BSicon td-STRq.svg
BSicon dSTRr+1-.svg
BSicon dSTRc4.svg
BSicon tv-STRrf.svg
BSicon dSTR.svg
BSicon tBHFa@g.svg
Charing Cross
BSicon tINT.svg
Glasgow Queen Street
( Glasgow Subway.svg Buchanan Street)
BSicon PORTALg.svg
BSicon BHF.svg
High Street
BSicon HST.svg
Bellgrove
BSicon KRWgl.svg
BSicon KRW+r.svg
Carntyne
BSicon HST.svg
BSicon HST.svg
Duke Street
Shettleston
BSicon HST.svg
BSicon HST.svg
Alexandra Parade
Garrowhill
BSicon HST.svg
BSicon HST.svg
Barnhill
Easterhouse
BSicon HST.svg
BSicon KHSTe.svg
Springburn
Blairhill
BSicon HST.svg
Coatbridge Sunnyside
BSicon HST.svg
Coatdyke
BSicon HST.svg
Airdrie
BSicon BHF.svg
Drumgelloch
BSicon HST.svg
Caldercruix
BSicon HST.svg
Blackridge
BSicon HST.svg
Armadale
BSicon HST.svg
Bathgate
BSicon HST.svg
Livingston North
BSicon HST.svg
Uphall
BSicon HST.svg
Edinburgh Park EdinburghTramsGeneric.png
BSicon HST.svg
Haymarket EdinburghTramsGeneric.png
BSicon BHF.svg
Edinburgh Waverley
( EdinburghTramsGeneric.png St Andrew Square)
BSicon KBHFe.svg

The North Clyde Line (defined by Network Rail as the Glasgow North Electric Suburban line) is a suburban railway in West Central Scotland. The route is operated by ScotRail Trains. As a result of the incorporation of the Airdrie–Bathgate rail link and the Edinburgh–Bathgate line, this route has become the fourth rail link between Glasgow and Edinburgh.

Contents

Route

Alongside the Clyde at Bowling Harbour Bowling Harbour 320301.jpg
Alongside the Clyde at Bowling Harbour

The North Clyde Line (known as Dunbartonshire - Glasgow, Cumbernauld and Falkirk Grahamston in timetables), electrified by British Rail in 1960, ran east–west through the Greater Glasgow conurbation, linking northern Lanarkshire with western Dunbartonshire, by way of the city centre. Fifty years later, in 2010, the line was extended by Network Rail east from Airdrie, by way of re-opening the line to Bathgate meeting up with the line re-opened by British Rail from Edinburgh.

The main core of the route runs from Edinburgh Waverley to Helensburgh Central via Bathgate and Glasgow Queen Street (Low Level). To the east of the Glasgow city centre, there is a short branch to Springburn, while to the west there are two routes between Hyndland and Dalmuir (via Singer and via Yoker), as well as branches to Milngavie and Balloch.

The lines from Partick to Dalmuir and Milngavie are also used by Argyle Line services, whilst West Highland Line services share the line between Westerton and Craigendoran. In the east, the line between Newbridge Junction and Edinburgh Waverley is shared with the Glasgow to Edinburgh via Falkirk Line and the Edinburgh to Dunblane Line. In addition to the interchange with services from Glasgow Queen Street (High Level) and Edinburgh Waverley, there are interchanges with the Cumbernauld Line at Springburn, with the Maryhill Line at Anniesland, and with the Glasgow Subway at Partick. Some sections of the North Clyde Line are also traversed by freight trains.

The line runs through central Glasgow, and the principal station on the line is Glasgow Queen Street (Low Level). The section through the city centre largely runs in tunnels between High Street and the former Finnieston station (west of Charing Cross at the intersection of Argyle Street and Kent Road). This is the oldest stretch of underground railway in Glasgow, opened as the Glasgow City & District Railway in 1886 and predating the Glasgow Subway by some ten years.

History

Lists of Openings, Closures, and Re-openings

Constituents

Like most of Glasgow's suburban railways, the North Clyde Lines as they are known today were built piecemeal from a patchwork of routes from various Victorian-era railway companies. In addition to the extension east of Airdrie, these are listed below: [1] [ page needed ]

The majority of these lines were absorbed by (or were subsidiaries of) the North British Railway; the exceptions being the Lanarkshire and Dunbartonshire Railway, which was part of the Caledonian Railway, and the western part of the Caledonian and Dunbartonshire Junction Railway (which was joint between the North British and the Caledonian). At the time of the Grouping in 1923, the North British Railway became part of the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER), while the Caledonian Railway became part of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS).

Closures

Following nationalisation in 1948, all of the lines came under the ownership of British Railways. A number of former LNER branch lines which fed into the North Clyde system were closed during the 1950s because they duplicated former LMS lines. Other lines closed due to lack of traffic, or later because they were not selected for inclusion in the electrification project. Notable withdrawals of passenger service occurred on:

  • 1 May 1930: Manuel and Bathgate to Coatbridge Central (via Blackstone);
  • 2 April 1951: Whiteinch Victoria branch, also the Kelvin Valley Line (Maryhill to Kilsyth);
  • 10 September 1951: Bothwell to Coatbridge Sunnyside;
  • 15 September 1952: Hamilton to Bothwell;
  • 4 July 1955: Bothwell to Shettleston;
  • 9 January 1956: Ratho to Airdrie;
  • 14 September 1959: Clydebank East terminus;
  • 5 November 1960: Hyndland branch (replaced by new Hyndland station on main line)
  • 5 November 1979: Bridgeton Central branch (replaced by Bridgeton on the Argyle Line)
  • 28 September 1986: Balloch Central to Balloch Pier

Re-openings

  • 24 March 1986: Newbridge Junction to Bathgate (passenger services)
  • May 1989: Airdrie to Drumgelloch
  • 18 October 2010: Drumgelloch to Bathgate (line open for driver training and charter trains)
  • 12 December 2010: Drumgelloch to Bathgate (passenger services)

Electrification

A plaque commemorating the Glasgow suburban electrification by the entrance to the North Clyde Line platforms at Glasgow Queen Street Glasgow Suburban Electrification Commemorative Plaque.jpg
A plaque commemorating the Glasgow suburban electrification by the entrance to the North Clyde Line platforms at Glasgow Queen Street

In 1960 the remainder of the North Clyde suburban system (Airdrie, Springburn and Bridgeton Central to Milngavie, Balloch Pier and Helensburgh Central, including both routes between Partick and Dalmuir) underwent electrification. After a ceremony on Saturday 5 November 1960, a free public service of electric trains ran on Sunday, and the full normal advertised public service started on Monday 7 November 1960. [2] A new junction between the former LNER and LMS lines was built at Dunglass, just west of Bowling, allowing North Clyde Line services to use the former LMS (Lanarkshire and Dunbartonshire) line through Dumbarton East, and the original LNER (Caledonian and Dunbartonshire Junction) line from Dunglass to Dumbarton Central was closed. The outer areas were electrified to the 25 kV AC 50 Hz standard, with the central area, the Springburn, Bridgeton, and Milngavie branches, and the Yoker line being at 6.25 kV AC due to restricted clearances in tunnels. As insulation technology improved these lines were eventually converted to 25 kV.

In October 2010, the line between Bathgate and Airdrie opened complete with electrification at 25 kV for crew training and charter trains. The section between Bathgate and Haymarket (including the section that is common with the Glasgow to Edinburgh via Falkirk Line east of Newbridge Junction) was also electrified at 25 kV. This work was carried out as part of the Airdrie-Bathgate Rail Link.

Argyle line

The former Caledonian Railway lines in north-west Glasgow and Dunbartonshire (Lanarkshire and Dunbartonshire Railway and Glasgow Central Railway) closed to passengers and then freight. However, the section from Rutherglen through Glasgow Central (Low Level) was reopened as the Argyle Line in 1979. A new flying junction was built east of Partick to connect the Argyle Line with the North Clyde Line. The Bridgeton Central branch closed to passengers on 5 November 1979, having been replaced by the re-opened Bridgeton Cross station on the Argyle Line, though Bridgeton Central station was retained as a carriage cleaning facility. On 17 December 1979, Partickhill station was replaced by the new Partick (Interchange) slightly to the south, which provides a connection with the Subway.

Balloch Pier

Pleasure steamer operations on Loch Lomond ceased in the 1980s, leading to the closure of Balloch Pier on 28 September 1986. The Balloch branch was further truncated in April 1988 when Balloch Central was replaced by the new Balloch station on the opposite site of Balloch Road, which allowed the elimination of a level crossing. The catenary from the closed section to Balloch Pier was then used to reopen the line east of Airdrie to a new terminus at Drumgelloch in May 1989.[ citation needed ]

A Class 334 at Haymarket station in Edinburgh with a through service from Helensburgh 334036 at Haymarket.jpg
A Class 334 at Haymarket station in Edinburgh with a through service from Helensburgh

Passenger services from Edinburgh to Airdrie ceased in 1956, but the line between Edinburgh and Bathgate was reopened to passenger traffic on a trial basis in 1986 and proved an instant success. In 2005, the Scottish Executive declared that in line with plans to upgrade the remaining section of the A8 road to motorway standard, public transport links between Glasgow and Edinburgh must also be improved. Therefore, to create a fourth direct rail link between Glasgow and Edinburgh, the closed section of the Bathgate and Coatbridge Railway between Bathgate and the 1989 Drumgelloch station was re-opened, and the existing lines from Newbridge Junction to Bathgate and Drumgelloch to Airdrie were upgraded. The whole line is double track and electrified, with a maximum line speed of 90 mph (140 km/h). The existing 30-minute frequency Helensburgh–Drumgelloch and Milngavie–Airdrie services have been extended to Edinburgh Waverley providing an enhanced 15 minute frequency between Bathgate and Edinburgh.

The new link received the final approval of the Scottish Parliament on 28 March 2007 and gained Royal Assent on 9 May 2007. Work commenced with a sod cutting ceremony at Livingston North in June 2007, with reinstatement of double track between Newbridge and Bathgate being the first stage, completed in October 2008.

The line opened for driver training and charter trains in October 2010, with the passenger service commencing on 12 December 2010. [3]

Cumbernauld Line

As part of the wider Edinburgh to Glasgow Improvement Programme (EGIP), plans were made to electrify the Cumbernauld Line and the Garngad Chord, adjacent to Springburn, creating an electrified link between the Springburn branch of the North Clyde Line and the Cumbernauld Line - then operated by diesel multiple units into Glasgow Queen Street High Level - allowing electric service from Cumbernauld into the Low Level of Glasgow Queen Street, and thus connecting Cumbernauld to destinations west of Glasgow, whilst also freeing up capacity on the High Level lines out of Queen Street. Contracts for the improvements were let out in January 2013, with completion scheduled in time for the 2014 Commonwealth Games. From May 2014, electric trains began running between Balloch/Dalmuir and Cumbernauld (Monday - Saturday) and Partick and Cumbernauld (Sunday) using class 318, 320, and 334. [4] As the reinstatement of the Garngad Chord was cancelled, the through-service trains had to reverse at Springburn station. Following the completion of EGIP, through electric services from Glasgow Queen Street High Level to Edinburgh Waverley via Cumbernauld were introduced using new Class 385 units, replacing the services which previously reversed at Springburn.

Service pattern

Winter 2009/10

Off-peak Monday to Saturday

There are also peak hour limited stop morning commuter services from Balloch to Queen Street and Airdrie to Milngavie. Limited stop evening commuter services run from Queen Street to Balloch.

Argyle Line services provide services from Glasgow Central (Low Level) to Milngavie, Dalmuir (via Yoker) and Dalmuir (via Singer), on 30 minute frequencies.

The section through Partick and Hyndland stations is one of the busiest in Scotland, with 28 trains per hour using the double track line.

Monday to Saturday after 6pm

Passengers wishing to travel to Milngavie after 7pm must change at Partick or Hyndland for an Argyle Line service.

Sunday

Argyle Line services provide services from Glasgow Central (Low Level) to Balloch (via Yoker) and Milngavie on 30 minute frequencies.

Winter 2010/11 (Interim timetable from 12 December 2010)

As a result of delays with commissioning of the Class 380 trains, insufficient Class 334 trains for the full service have been available for introduction of intended timetable from 12 December 2010. [5]

Off-peak Monday to Friday [6]

Argyle Line services provide services from Glasgow Central (Low Level) to Milngavie, Dalmuir (via Yoker) and Dalmuir (via Singer), on 30 minute frequencies.

Monday to Friday after 6pm

Passengers wishing to travel to Milngavie after 7pm must change at Westerton for an Argyle Line service.

Saturday [7]

Argyle Line services provide services from Glasgow Central (Low Level) to Milngavie, Dalmuir (via Yoker) and Dalmuir (via Singer), on 30 minute frequencies.

Saturday after 6pm [7]
Sunday [8]

Winter 2010/11 (Full service from 12 December 2010)

Following the opening of the line between Airdrie and Bathgate, the service is combined with Edinburgh to Bathgate service, the complete service when sufficient rolling stock is available is: [3]

Off-peak Monday to Saturday

There are also peak hour limited stop morning commuter services from Balloch to Queen Street and Airdrie to Milngavie. Limited stop evening commuter services run from Queen Street to Balloch.

Argyle Line services provide services from Glasgow Central (Low Level) to Milngavie, Dalmuir (via Yoker) and Dalmuir (via Singer), on 30 minute frequencies.

The section through Partick and Hyndland stations is one of the busiest in Scotland, with 28 trains per hour using the double track line.

Monday to Saturday after 6pm

Passengers wishing to travel to Milngavie after 7pm must change at Westerton for an Argyle Line service.

Sunday

Argyle Line services provide services from Glasgow Central (Low Level) to Balloch (via Yoker) and Milngavie on 30 minute frequencies.

Winter 2011/12

Off-peak Monday to Saturday

There are also peak hour limited stop morning commuter services from Balloch to Queen Street and Airdrie to Milngavie. Limited stop evening commuter services run from Queen Street to Balloch.

Argyle Line services provide services from Glasgow Central (Low Level) to Milngavie, Dalmuir (via Yoker) and Dalmuir (via Singer), on 30 minute frequencies.

The section through Partick and Hyndland stations is one of the busiest in Scotland, with 28 trains per hour using the double track line.

Monday to Saturday after 6pm

Passengers wishing to travel to Milngavie after 7pm must change at Partick or Hyndland for an Argyle Line service.

Sunday

Argyle Line services provide services from Glasgow Central (Low Level) to Balloch (via Yoker) and Milngavie on 30 minute frequencies.

Summer 2016 (From 8 August 2016)

Off peak Monday to Saturday

Argyle Line services provide services from Glasgow Central (Low Level) to Milngavie, Dalmuir (via Yoker) and Dalmuir (via Singer) on 30 minute frequencies.

Passengers wishing to travel to Milngavie after 7pm must change at Partick or Hyndland for an Argyle Line service.

Sunday

Argyle Line services provide services from Glasgow Central (Low Level) to Balloch (via Yoker) and Milngavie on 30 minute frequencies.

Rolling stock

A Class 303 at Milngavie in 1985 Milngavie station - geograph.org.uk - 1691808.jpg
A Class 303 at Milngavie in 1985
A Class 320 at Partick 320 Partick.JPG
A Class 320 at Partick
A Class 334 at Glasgow Queen Street 334007 at GQS LL.jpg
A Class 334 at Glasgow Queen Street

Historic

Prior to electrification, passenger services were operated primarily by tank engines, notably Class N2 0-6-2T and Class V1/V3 2-6-2T, which were allocated to depots at Parkhead and Kipps (Coatbridge).

Electrification brought the introduction of the legendary and locally-built Class 303 EMUs, operated from a new depot at the former Hyndland terminus station. From 1967 they were joined by the similar Class 311 EMUs, which were built for the Inverclyde Line electrification but which were initially allocated to Hyndland for maintenance and were occasionally used on the North Clyde Line. The Class 303 and 311 trains were nicknamed the "Blue Trains" because of the bright Caledonian Blue colour scheme they carried in the 1960s, at a time when most British Railways passenger stock was painted either green or maroon. In the late 1960s they began to be repainted in the new standard Rail Blue, and from the late 1970s they received coaching stock blue/grey livery. This was followed by the distinctive Strathclyde PTE orange-and-black scheme in the 1980s. A few of the last surviving Class 303s eventually received the new SPT carmine/cream livery in the late 1990s. In September 2008 Transport Scotland announced that the SPT carmine and cream livery would be discontinued; trains will start to be repainted in a new, blue livery with white Saltire motifs at the ends of each carriage.

In the 1970s, a new electric locomotive/EMU depot was built at Shields Road south of the Clyde, and this took over maintenance of the EMUs used on the Cathcart Circle and Inverclyde Lines, including all of the Class 311s. The reopening of the Argyle Line in 1979 resulted in the introduction of Class 314 EMUs, which were allocated to Hyndland. Although used almost exclusively on the Argyle Line, some North Clyde Line services were also operated by Class 314s. In 1987, Hyndland depot closed and was replaced by new carriage sidings at Yoker, with maintenance transferred to Shields Road. Thereafter, Class 311s began to appear more frequently on some North Clyde services. However, it was not until 1990 that a start was made on replacing the Class 303s, which still operated the great majority of services on the North Clyde Line.

Class 320 EMUs were introduced in 1990 and took over most North Clyde services, enabling the withdrawal of many Class 303s and all of the 311s. A few Class 303 units continued to operate on the North Clyde Line until December 2002, when they were finally withdrawn. They were replaced by the Class 334 Alstom Juniper EMUs, together with Class 318 units which had been cascaded from the Ayrshire Coast Lines. The Class 318s and 334s also replaced the Class 314 units on the Argyle Line, and these were in turn displaced to the Cathcart Circle and Inverclyde Lines to replace the last 303s.

Present stock

Class 334s currently operate services through to Edinburgh via Bathgate and a handful of North Clyde Line services, with Class 320s and Class 318s operating the majority of North Clyde Line services and Argyle Line services. Class 318s and Class 320s are not permitted to operate in service east of Airdie due to the lack of CCTV and platform mirrors for the driver to check the doors; the Class 334s have CCTV installed onboard.

Future development

Crossrail Glasgow

With many passengers travelling north–south through the city centre having to walk or use a shuttle bus between Central and Queen Street stations, SPT has long proposed a direct rail link between the North Clyde system and the lines radiating from Glasgow Central (High Level). This would allow direct service from Renfrewshire and Ayrshire stations to Glasgow Queen Street (Low Level), and would also allow new cross-city services such as Airdrie to Paisley. The plan would involve re-opening to passenger traffic the freight-only City Union Line between Shields Junction and Bellgrove, and building a new curve between Gallowgate and High Street. Reopening of the closed line from Strathbungo to Gorbals would allow trains from Barrhead and East Kilbride to use Crossrail. Funding for the scheme has yet to be sought, and the project remains a long-term aspiration only.

Accidents and incidents

See also

Related Research Articles

Helensburgh Central railway station Railway station in Argyll and Bute, Scotland

Helensburgh Central railway station serves the town of Helensburgh on the north shore of the Firth of Clyde, near Glasgow, Scotland. The station is a terminus on the North Clyde Line, 24 miles (38 km) north west of Glasgow Queen Street railway station. Passenger services are operated by ScotRail Trains on behalf of Strathclyde Partnership for Transport.

Dalmuir railway station Railway station in West Dunbartonshire, Scotland

Dalmuir railway station is a railway station serving the Dalmuir area of Clydebank, West Dunbartonshire, Scotland. It is a large, five platform interchange between the Argyle Line, North Clyde Line and West Highland Line.

Clydebank railway station Railway station in West Dunbartonshire, Scotland

Clydebank railway station is a railway station serving the town of Clydebank in West Dunbartonshire, Scotland. It is located on the Argyle Line and the North Clyde Line. Passenger services are operated by ScotRail.

Yoker railway station Railway station in West Dunbartonshire, Scotland

Yoker railway station serves the district of Yoker, Scotland.

Anniesland railway station Railway station in Glasgow, Scotland

Anniesland railway station is a railway station that serves the Anniesland suburb of Glasgow, Scotland.

Westerton railway station Railway station in East Dunbartonshire, Scotland

Westerton railway station is a railway station that serves the Westerton district in the town of Bearsden, Scotland.

Dumbarton Central railway station Railway station in West Dunbartonshire, Scotland

Dumbarton Central railway station serves the town of Dumbarton in West Dunbartonshire, Scotland. This station is on the West Highland Line and the North Clyde Line, 15+34 miles (25.3 km) northwest of Glasgow Queen Street.

Partick station Glasgow subway and railway station

Partick station is an interchange station in the Partick area of Glasgow, Scotland. Along with an adjacent bus station, it forms one of the main transport hubs in Glasgow. The station is served by Glasgow Subway and National Rail services and was one of the first to receive bilingual English and Gaelic signs, because there is a significant Gaelic-speaking population in the Partick area.

Hyndland railway station Railway station in Glasgow, Scotland

Hyndland railway station serves Hyndland in Glasgow, Scotland. The station is 3+14 miles (5.2 km) west of Glasgow Central and 2+34 miles (4.4 km) west of Glasgow Queen Street on the Argyle and North Clyde Lines. It is managed by ScotRail.

Garscadden railway station Railway station in Glasgow, Scotland

Garscadden railway station serves Garscadden in Glasgow, Scotland. The station is managed by ScotRail and lies on the Argyle Line.

Springburn railway station Railway station in Glasgow, Scotland

Springburn railway station serves the Springburn district of Glasgow, Scotland. The station is 1+14 miles (2.0 km) north of Glasgow Queen Street station on the Cumbernauld Line and is a terminus of the Springburn branch, a spur from Bellgrove station, on the North Clyde Line.

Cardross railway station Railway station in Argyll and Bute, Scotland

Cardross railway station is a railway station serving the village of Cardross, Scotland. The station is 19 miles (31 km) north west of Glasgow Queen Street on the North Clyde Line positioned on the banks of the north side of the river Clyde. The station is managed by ScotRail. The station has two platforms and a footbridge as well as a level crossing mainly used by the nearby sawmill.

Bellgrove railway station Railway station in Glasgow

Bellgrove Railway Station is in the East End of Glasgow, Scotland, serving the city's Calton, Gallowgate and south Dennistoun neighbourhoods. The station is approximately 1 mile (1.6 km) to the east of Glasgow Queen Street, and is managed by ScotRail.

High Street (Glasgow) railway station Railway station in Glasgow, Scotland

High Street railway station serves High Street in Glasgow, Scotland and the surrounding area. The station is managed by ScotRail and is served by trains on the North Clyde Line. It is located in the eastern part of the city centre, with Strathclyde University, Glasgow Cathedral and Glasgow Royal Infirmary being major institutions located nearby.

Charing Cross railway station (Scotland) Railway station in Glasgow, Scotland

Charing Cross (Glasgow) is a railway station close to the centre of Glasgow, Scotland, serving the district of the same name. It is managed by ScotRail and is served by trains on the North Clyde Line.

Coatbridge Sunnyside railway station Railway station in North Lanarkshire, Scotland

Coatbridge Sunnyside railway station serves the town of Coatbridge in North Lanarkshire, Scotland. The railway station is managed by ScotRail and is located on the North Clyde Line, 9 miles (14 km) east of Glasgow Queen Street.

Airdrie railway station Railway station in North Lanarkshire, Scotland

Airdrie railway station is a railway station serving the town of Airdrie, North Lanarkshire, Scotland. The station is managed by ScotRail and is served by trains on the North Clyde Line, 11 miles (18 km) east of Glasgow Queen Street.

Cumbernauld railway station Railway station in North Lanarkshire, Scotland

Cumbernauld railway station serves the town of Cumbernauld, Scotland. The station is managed by ScotRail and is located on the Cumbernauld Line, 14 miles (23 km) north east of Glasgow Queen Street station and the Motherwell to Cumbernauld Line, 11+34 miles (18.9 km) north of Motherwell. Trains serving the station are operated by ScotRail.

Bathgate railway station Railway station in West Lothian, Scotland

Bathgate railway station is a railway station serving Bathgate in West Lothian, Scotland. Opened on 18 October 2010, it is close to the junction of the former Edinburgh and Bathgate Railway and the former Bathgate and Coatbridge Railway to the east of the 1986 station. Ticket gates are in operation.

Drumgelloch railway station Railway station in North Lanarkshire, Scotland

Drumgelloch railway station is a railway station serving the east of Airdrie, North Lanarkshire, Scotland. It is located 600 yards (550 m) east of the 1989 station on the former Bathgate and Coatbridge Railway, on the site of the former Clarkston railway station. The station previously closed in 1956.

References

Notes

  1. Awdry (1990).
  2. "Times, 7 November 1960". Railway Magazine. December 1960.[ full citation needed ]
  3. 1 2 "National Rail Timetable 226; December 2010" (PDF). Retrieved 17 November 2010.[ permanent dead link ]
  4. "Carillion awarded £40m Cumbernauld electrification contract". Railway Gazette International. Archived from the original on 28 June 2015. Retrieved 1 February 2013.
  5. "We've added something new to Central Scotland". Archived from the original on 11 January 2011.
  6. "Interim timetable: Edinburgh to/from Helensburgh MONDAY TO FRIDAY Service" (PDF). Retrieved 3 January 2011.[ permanent dead link ]
  7. 1 2 "Interim timetable: Edinburgh to/from Helensburgh SATURDAY Service" (PDF). Retrieved 3 January 2011.[ permanent dead link ]
  8. "Interim timetable: Edinburgh to/from Helensburgh SUNDAY Service" (PDF). Retrieved 3 January 2011.[ permanent dead link ]

Sources