North Hwanghae Province

Last updated
North Hwanghae Province

황해북도
Korean transcription(s)
   Chosŏn'gŭl
   Hancha
  McCune-ReischauerHwanghaebuk-to
  Revised RomanizationHwanghaebuk-do
Hwanghaebuk-do in North Korea.svg
Coordinates: 38°30′23.0″N125°45′34.9″E / 38.506389°N 125.759694°E / 38.506389; 125.759694 Coordinates: 38°30′23.0″N125°45′34.9″E / 38.506389°N 125.759694°E / 38.506389; 125.759694
CountryFlag of North Korea.svg  North Korea
Region Haeso
Capital Sariwon
Subdivisions2 cities; 18 counties
Government
  Party Committee Chairman Ryang Jong-hun [1] (WPK)
  Provincial Committee of the WPK Pak Chang-ho [2]
  People's Committee Chairman Im Hun [1]
Area
  Total8,154 km2 (3,148 sq mi)
Population
 (2008)
  Total2,113,672
  Density260/km2 (670/sq mi)
Time zone UTC+9 (Pyongyang Time)
Dialect Hwanghae

North Hwanghae Province (Hwanghaebuk-to; Korean pronunciation:  [ɸwa̠ŋ.ɦɛ.buk̚.t͈o̞] , lit. "north Yellow Sea province") is a province of North Korea. The province was formed in 1954 when the former Hwanghae Province was split into North and South Hwanghae. The provincial capital is Sariwon. The province is bordered by Pyongyang and South Pyongan to the north, Kangwon to the east, Kaesong Industrial Region and South Korea's Gyeonggi Province to the south, and South Hwanghae southwest. In 2003, Kaesong Directly Governed City (Kaesong Chikhalsi) became part of North Hwanghae. Later on in 2019, it was promoted as Special City (Kaesong T'ŭkpyŏlsi). Thus, it was separated from North Hwanghae.

Contents

Administrative divisions

North Hwanghae is divided into 2 cities ("si") and 18 counties ("kun"). Three of these counties (Chunghwa, Kangnam, and Sangwon) were added to the province in 2010 after being split from Pyongyang. [3] However, Kangnam was returned to Pyongyang in 2011. [4]

Landscape near Koksan in North Hwanghae Province, North Korea. Hwanghae-Province-Scenery.jpg
Landscape near Koksan in North Hwanghae Province, North Korea.

Cities

Counties

Transportation

North Hwanghae is connected to the rest of the country by way of the Pyongbu Railway Line (known in South Korea as the Kyongui Line), which, in theory, runs from Pyongyang to Pusan; however, in reality, the line is cut short by the Korean Demilitarized Zone. It is also served by several large highways, most notably the Pyongyang-Kaesong Motorway.

Education

There are several higher-level educational institutions in North Hwanghae, all government-run. These include the Kye Ung Sang Sariwon University of Agriculture, the Sariwon University of Geology, and the Sariwon Teachers University.

Culture

Historic landmarks

North Hwanghae has many historical relics as the site of the Koryo-dynasty capital at Kaesong, a depository for many famous historic relics. The province is also home to the tombs of many of the Koryo monarchs, the most famous being the tombs of kings Taejo and Kongmin, though others are spread throughout Kaesong and Kaepung county. Kaesong also houses the Koguryo-era Taehungsan Fortress, built to protect the kingdom's capital at Pyongyang and enclosing the famous Kwanum Temple. Nearby to Sariwin is the famous Jongbangsan Fortress, another Koguryo satellite for the defense of Pyongyang. This fortress encompasses the 9th-century Songbulsa Buddhist temple, one of the oldest and most picturesque in the country.

Related Research Articles

<i>Goguryeo</i> Ancient Korean kingdom that occupies land in present-day Korea and China.

Goguryeo, also called Goryeo, was a Korean kingdom located in the northern and central parts of the Korean Peninsula and the southern and central parts of Manchuria. At its peak of power, Goguryeo controlled most of the Korean peninsula, large parts of Manchuria and parts of eastern Mongolia and Inner Mongolia.

South Hwanghae Province Province of North Korea

South Hwanghae Province is a province in western North Korea. The province was formed in 1954 when the former Hwanghae Province was split into North and South Hwanghae. The provincial capital is Haeju.

Kangwon Province (North Korea) Province of North Korea

Kangwon Province is a province of North Korea, with its capital at Wŏnsan. Before the division of Korea in 1945, Kangwŏn Province and its South Korean neighbour Gangwon Province formed a single province that excluded Wŏnsan.

Kaesong Special City in North Hwanghae Province, North Korea

Kaesong (개성) is a special city in the southern part of North Korea, and the capital of Korea during the Taebong kingdom and subsequent Goryeo dynasty. The city is near the Kaesong Industrial Region close to the border with South Korea and contains the remains of the Manwoldae palace. Called Songdo while it was the ancient capital of Goryeo, the city prospered as a trade centre that produced Korean ginseng. Kaesong now functions as the DPRK's light industry centre.

Goguryeo tombs

Goguryeo tombs, officially designated as the Complex of Koguryo Tombs, are tombs in North Korea. In July 2004, they became the first UNESCO World Heritage site in the country. The site consists of 30 individual tombs from the later Goguryeo kingdom, one of Three Kingdoms of Korea, located in the cities of P'yŏngyang and Namp'o. Goguryeo was one of the strongest ancient Korean kingdoms located in the northern and central parts of the Korean Peninsula and the southern and central parts of Manchuria. The kingdom was founded in the present day area of North Korea, and part of Manchuria around 37 BCE, and the capital was transferred to P'yŏngyang in 427 CE.

Capital Cities and Tombs of the Ancient Koguryo Kingdom

The Capital Cities and Tombs of the Ancient Koguryo Kingdom is a UNESCO World Heritage Site which includes a number of archaeological sites currently in Ji'an, Jilin Province and Huanren, Liaoning Province in Northeast China., was a Korean kingdom located in the northern and central parts of the Korean Peninsula and the southern and central parts of Manchuria.

Kangnam County is one of the two suburban counties of Pyongyang, North Korea. It is north-west of Songrim, north-east of Hwangju County, west of Chunghwa County, and south of Nakrang-guyok. It is the location of cooperative farms and smaller industrial complexes. It became part of Pyongyang in May 1963, when it was separated from South P'yŏngan. In 2010, it was administratively reassigned from Pyongyang to North Hwanghae; foreign media attributed the change as an attempt to relieve shortages in Pyongyang's food distribution system. However, it was returned to Pyongyang in 2011.

Rangrang-guyŏk or Rangrang District is one of the 18 kuyŏk that constitute the city of Pyongyang, North Korea. It is located south of the Taedong River, and is bordered to the north by Songyo-guyok, to the east by the Ryokpo-guyok, and to the south by Chunghwa and Kangnam counties.

Taehung Castle is a mountain fortress of the early Goryeo period, located outside Kaesŏng, North Hwanghae Province, North Korea. Originally encompassing both Mts. Chŏnma and Songgo, the castle was first founded as a fortress for the defense of the capital, encircled by over 10 kilometers of stone walls. Today, many of the walls have become overgrown ruins.

Jŏngbang Castle is a Koguryo-era mountain fortress located outside Sariwŏn, North Hwanghae Province, North Korea. Cresting the ridges of Mt. Jŏngbang, the castle was founded as a fortress for the defence of the Koguryo capital of Pyongyang. Rebuilt in 1632, the castle is encircled by over 12 kilometres of 6-metre high stone walls, which extend to over ten metres tall in some places. The walls are pierced by four large gates, the most well preserved of which is the south one. Inside the castle, there are the ruins of commander's posts, barracks, arsenals, armories, granaries, storehouses.

Kaepung County County in North Hwanghae Province, North Korea

Kaep'ung County was a county in North Hwanghae province, North Korea. Formerly part of the Kaesong urban area, the county was merged with North Hwanghae when Kaesong was demoted in 2003. The area is the site of the royal tombs of kings Kongmin and Wanggon.

Sariwŏn Ch'ŏngnyŏn station is the central railway station of Sariwŏn, North Hwanghae province, North Korea. It is on located on the P'yŏngbu Line, which was formed from part of the Kyŏngŭi Line to accommodate the shift of the capital from Seoul to P'yŏngyang; though this line physically connects P'yŏngyang to Pusan via Dorasan, in operational reality it ends at Kaesŏng due to the Korean Demilitarized Zone. It is also the northern terminus of the Hwanghae Ch'ŏngnyŏn Line.

Chŏngbang station is a railway station located in Sariwŏn, North Hwanghae province, North Korea. It is on located on the P'yŏngbu Line, which was formed from part of the Kyŏngŭi Line to accommodate the shift of the capital from Seoul to P'yŏngyang; though this line physically connects P'yŏngyang to Pusan via Dorasan, in operational reality it ends at Kaesŏng due to the Korean Demilitarized Zone.

The Ahobiryong Mountains is a mountain range stretching from north to south in central North Korea. The range straddles the border between North Hwanghae and Kangwon provinces. The most famous part of the range is located near Kaesong, the ancient capital of the Koryo dynasty, located in North Hwanghaew; because of its natural beauty, it is sometimes called the "Kumgangsan" of Kaesong.

Chaeryong County County in South Hwanghae Province, North Korea

Chaeryŏng County is a county in South Hwanghae province, North Korea.

Sinchon County County in South Hwanghae Province, North Korea

Sinch'ŏn County is a county in South Hwanghae province, North Korea.

Anak County County in South Hwanghae Province, North Korea

Anak County is a county in South Hwanghae province, North Korea.

Royal Tombs of the Koryo Dynasty

The Royal Tombs of the Koryo Dynasty are a group of tombs of members of the Korean Koryo Dynasty (918-1392).

Pyongbu Line

The P'yŏngbu Line is an electrified standard-gauge trunk line of the Korean State Railway running from P'yŏngyang to Kaesŏng in North Korea and further south across the DMZ to Seoul in South Korea; the name comes from the two (theoretical) termini of the line: P'yŏngyang and Busan.

References

  1. 1 2 "Organizational Chart of North Korean Leadership" (PDF). Seoul: Political and Military Analysis Division, Intelligence and Analysis Bureau; Ministry of Unification. January 2018. Retrieved 17 October 2018.
  2. "Supreme Leader Kim Jong Un Inspects Rebuilt Kangbuk-ri, Kumchon County, North Hwanghae Province". Pyongyang: Rodong Sinmun. September 2020. Retrieved 16 September 2020.
  3. "Pyongyang now more than one-third smaller; food shortage issues suspected", Asahi Shimbun , 2010-07-17, retrieved 2010-07-19
  4. http://www.nkeconwatch.com/2012/02/29/kangnam-moved-into-pyongyang/