North Korea women's national football team

Last updated

Korea DPR
North Korea FA.png
Nickname(s) Chollima (천리마/千里馬)
Association DPR Korea Football Association
Confederation AFC (Asia)
Sub-confederation EAFF (East Asia)
Head coach Jo Song-ok [1]
Home stadium Rungnado Stadium
Kim Il-Sung Stadium
Yanggakdo Stadium
FIFA code PRK
Kit left arm dpr15h.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body dpr15h.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm dpr15h.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts dpr15h.png
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
First colours
Kit left arm dpr15a.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body dpr15a.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm dpr15a.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts dpr15a.png
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Kit socks long.svg
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 9 Increase2.svg 2 (12 July 2019) [2]
Highest5 (December 1999)
Lowest12 (July 2011)
First international
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 4–1 North Korea  Flag of North Korea (1948-1992).svg
(Hong Kong; 21 December 1989)
Biggest win
Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 24–0 Singapore  Flag of Singapore.svg
(Hong Kong; 21 June 2001)
Biggest defeat
Flag of France.svg  France 5–0 North Korea  Flag of North Korea.svg
(Glasgow, Scotland; 28 July 2012)
World Cup
Appearances4 (first in 1999 )
Best resultQuarter-finals; 2007
Women's Asian Cup
Appearances9 (first in 1989 )
Best resultWinners, 2001, 2003, 2008

The North Korea women's national football team represents North Korea in international women's football. [3] [4] North Korea won the AFC Women's Asian Cup in 2001 (scoring 51 goals in 6 matches, a standing record), 2003, and 2008.

North Korea Sovereign state in East Asia

North Korea, officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is a country in East Asia constituting the northern part of the Korean Peninsula, with Pyongyang the capital and the largest city in the country. To the north and northwest, the country is bordered by China and by Russia along the Amnok and Tumen rivers and to the south it is bordered by South Korea, with the heavily fortified Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two. Nevertheless, North Korea, like its southern counterpart, claims to be the legitimate government of the entire peninsula and adjacent islands.

Womens association football association football when played by women

Women's association football, usually known as women's football or women's soccer, is the most prominent team sport played by women around the globe. It is played at the professional level in numerous countries throughout the world and 176 national teams participate internationally.

Contents

Record

World Cup

The team at the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup Women's world cup 2011 North Korea - Colombia.jpg
The team at the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup
World Cup Finals
YearResultGPWD*LGFGAGD
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1991 Did not qualify
Flag of Sweden.svg 1995 Did not enter
Flag of the United States.svg 1999 Group Stage310246−2
Flag of the United States.svg 2003 310234−1
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2007 Quarter-finals411257−2
Flag of Germany.svg 2011 Group Stage301203−3
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 2015 Banned
Flag of France.svg 2019 Did not qualify
Total4/7133281220−8
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.
FIFA Women's World Cup history
YearRoundDateOpponentResultStadium
Flag of the United States.svg 1999 Group stage20 JuneFlag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria L 1–2 Rose Bowl, Pasadena
24 JuneFlag of Denmark.svg  Denmark W 3–1 Civic Stadium, Portland
27 JuneFlag of the United States.svg  United States L 0–3 Foxboro Stadium, Foxborough
Flag of the United States.svg 2003 Group stage20 SeptemberFlag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria W 3–0 Lincoln Financial Field, Philadelphia
25 SeptemberFlag of Sweden.svg  Sweden L 0–1
28 SeptemberFlag of the United States.svg  United States L 0–3 Columbus Crew Stadium, Columbus
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2007 Group stage11 SeptemberFlag of the United States.svg  United States D 2–2 Chengdu Sports Center, Chengdu
14 SeptemberFlag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria W 2–0
18 SeptemberFlag of Sweden.svg  Sweden L 1–2 Tianjin Olympic Centre Stadium, Tianjin
Quarter-finals22 SeptemberFlag of Germany.svg  Germany L 0–3 Wuhan Stadium, Wuhan
Flag of Germany.svg 2011 Group stage28 JuneFlag of the United States.svg  United States L 0–2 Rudolf-Harbig-Stadion, Dresden
2 JulyFlag of Sweden.svg  Sweden L 0–1 Impuls Arena, Augsburg
6 JulyFlag of Colombia.svg  Colombia D 0–0 Ruhrstadion, Bochum

Disqualification for 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup

During the team's participation at the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup, on 7 July 2011, FIFA announced that two of its players, Song Jong-Sun and Jong Pok-Sim, failing doping tests during the tournament and were provisionally suspended prior to their team’s match against Colombia. [5] On 16 July, FIFA announced that three additional players from North Korea tested positive following target testing of the whole team. [6] On 25 August 2011, the North Korean team was fined US$ 400,000 which is equal to the prize it received by finishing 13th in the 2011 tournament, and was excluded from participation at the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, including its qualification round. [7]

2011 FIFA Womens World Cup 2011 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup was the sixth FIFA Women's World Cup competition, the world championship for women's national association football teams. It was held from 26 June to 17 July 2011 in Germany, which won the right to host the event in October 2007. Japan won the final against the United States on a penalty shoot-out following a 2–2 draw after extra time and became the first Asian team to win a senior FIFA World Cup.

FIFA International governing body of association football

The Fédération Internationale de Football Association is a non-profit organization which describes itself as an international governing body of association football, fútsal, beach soccer, and efootball. It is the highest governing body of football.

2015 FIFA Womens World Cup 2015 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup was the seventh FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international women's football world championship tournament. The tournament was hosted by Canada for the first time and by a North American country for the third time. Matches were played in six cities across Canada in five time zones. The tournament began on 6 June 2015, and finished with the final on 5 July 2015 with a United States victory over Japan.

AFC Asian Cup

The Asian Football Confederation's 1975 AFC Women's Championship was the first AFC Women's Championship. It was held from 25 August to 3 September 1975 in Hong Kong. Participating members were New Zealand, Thailand, Australia, Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia. The tournament was won by New Zealand in the final against Thailand.

The Asian Football Confederation's 1977 AFC Women's Championship was the second AFC Women's Championship. It was held from 2 to 11 August 1977 in Taipei, Republic of China. The tournament was won by the Republic of China for the first time, who defeated Thailand in the final.

The Asian Football Confederation's 1981 AFC Women's Championship was the fourth AFC Women's Championship. It was held from 7 to 17 June 1981 in Hong Kong. The tournament was won by for the third consecutive time by Chinese Taipei in the final against Thailand.

Olympic Games

The football tournament at the 1996 Summer Olympics started on 20 July and finished on 3 August. The women's competition was contested for the first time in Olympic history at these Games.

Football at the 2000 Summer Olympics 2000 edition of the association football torunaments during the Olympic Summer Games

The football tournament at the 2000 Summer Olympics started on 15 September. The men's tournament is played by U-23 national teams, with up to three over age players allowed per squad. Article 1 of the tournament regulations states: "The Tournaments take place every four years, in conjunction with the Summer Olympic Games. The associations affiliated to FIFA are invited to participate with their men's U-23 and women's representative teams."

Football at the 2004 Summer Olympics 2004 edition of the association football torunaments during the Olympic Summer Games

The football tournament at the 2004 Summer Olympics started on 11 August, and ended on 28 August.

Asian Games

Asian Games record
Hosts / YearResultGPWDLGSGAGD
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1990 Third place5221193+16
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg 1994 Did not enter
Flag of Thailand (TIS 982 draft standard).svg 1998 Runners-up5311264+22
Flag of South Korea (1997-2011).svg 2002 Winners541080+8
Flag of Qatar.svg 2006 5410162+14
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2010 Runners-up421152+3
Flag of South Korea.svg 2014 Winners5500162+14
Flag of Indonesia.svg 2018 6th Place4202254+21
Total7/831226511517+98

EAFF Women's Football Championship

The third edition of the EAFF Women's Football Championship was held in 2010, with a preliminary qualification tournament held in 2009.

The 2013 EAFF Women's East Asian Cup was the fourth edition of EAFF Women's East Asian Cup. There were three competition rounds. The final round was won by North Korea. In August 2012, Australia accepted an invitation to take part.

2015 EAFF Womens East Asian Cup

The 2015 EAFF Women's East Asian Cup was the fifth edition of the EAFF Women's East Asian Cup, an international women's football tournament organised by the East Asian Football Federation. Nine of ten EAFF member nations entered the tournament. Only Mongolia did not participate.

EAFF Women's Football Championship record
Hosts / YearResultPldWD*LGFGAGD
Flag of South Korea (1997-2011).svg 2005 Runners-up320121+1
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2008 311163+3
Flag of Japan.svg 2010 Withdrew
Flag of South Korea.svg 2013 Winners321031+2
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2015 330094+5
Flag of Japan.svg 2017 330050+5
Total5/6151122259+16
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Algarve Cup

Other invitational tournaments

Current squad

Squad for the 2018 Asian Games. [9]

No.Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClub
1 GK Choe Kyong-im (1993-07-15)15 July 1993 (aged 25)
1 GK Kim Myong-sun (1997-03-06)6 March 1997 (aged 21)
1 GK Paek Yong-hui (1990-04-16)16 April 1990 (aged 28)
2 DF Pak Hye-gyong (2001-11-07)7 November 2001 (aged 16)
2 DF Son Ok-ju (2000-03-07)7 March 2000 (aged 18)
2 DF Kim Nam-hui (1994-03-04)4 March 1994 (aged 24)
2 DF Kim Un-ha (1993-03-23)23 March 1993 (aged 25)
3 MF Ju Hyo-sim (1998-06-21)21 June 1998 (aged 20)
3 MF Ri Hyang-sim (1996-03-23)23 March 1996 (aged 22)
3 MF Rim Se-ok (1994-01-13)13 January 1994 (aged 24)
3 MF Yu Jong-im (1993-12-06)6 December 1993 (aged 24)
3 MF Ri Un-yong (1996-09-01)1 September 1996 (aged 21)
3 MF Kim Yun-mi (1993-07-01)1 July 1993 (aged 25)
3 MF Kim Phyong-hwa (1996-11-28)28 November 1996 (aged 21)
4 FW Sung Hyang-sim (1999-12-02)2 December 1999 (aged 18)
4 FW Jang Hyon-sun (1991-07-01)1 July 1991 (aged 27)
4 FW Kim Un-hwa (1992-09-30)30 September 1992 (aged 25)
4 FW Ri Hae-yon (1999-01-10)10 January 1999 (aged 19)
4 FW Ri Kyong-hyang (1996-06-10)10 June 1996 (aged 22)
4 FW Wi Jong-sim (1997-10-13)13 October 1997 (aged 20)

See also

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References

  1. FIFA.com. "Member Association - Korea DPR - FIFA.com". www.fifa.com. Retrieved 2019-08-27.
  2. "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 12 July 2019. Retrieved 12 July 2019.
  3. "Kim Jong-il: The Success Behind DPR Ladies Football?". Goal.com. 2009-01-06. Retrieved 2012-11-01.
  4. "Red devils vs. 'axis of evil'-INSIDE Korea JoongAng Daily". Koreajoongangdaily.joinsmsn.com. 2002-09-05. Retrieved 2012-10-31.
  5. "Two players from Korea DPR provisionally suspended following anti-doping tests". FIFA . 2011-07-07. Retrieved 2011-07-07.
  6. "Adverse analytical findings recorded for three additional players from Korea DPR". FIFA . 2011-07-16. Retrieved 2011-07-16.
  7. "FIFA Disciplinary Committee decisions for Germany 2011". FIFA.com. 2011-08-25. Retrieved 2011-10-21.
  8. Australia Cup
  9. "Athletes DPR Korea Football". Asian Games 2018. Retrieved 13 August 2018.
Sporting positions
Preceded by
1999 China PR  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg
AFC Women's Champions
2001 (First title)
2003 (Second title)
Succeeded by
2006 China PR  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg
Preceded by
2006 China PR  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg
AFC Women's Champions
2008 (Third title)
Succeeded by
2010 Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg