Nottingham Racecourse

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Nottingham Racecourse
View from Colwick Woods park - geograph.org.uk - 861161.jpg
View of the racecourse from Colwick Woods Park
Location Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England
Coordinates 52°56′53.12″N1°06′24.51″W / 52.9480889°N 1.1068083°W / 52.9480889; -1.1068083
Owned by Jockey Club Racecourses
Date opened1892
Screened on Racing TV
Course type Flat
Official website

Nottingham Racecourse is a thoroughbred horse racing venue located in Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England. [1] It is situated at Colwick Park, close to the River Trent and about 3 km east of the city centre.

Contents

Characteristics

There are actually two courses at Nottingham, one inside the other. They are both approximately 1 1/2 miles round and are left-handed. The inner is used during spring and autumn, and has a 5 furlong straight, the outer is used during summer and has a 6 furlong straight. The course generally has easy turns and minor gradients, but the home turn is fairly sharp. [2] Nottingham suits well-balanced horses rather than long-striding ones. [3]

History

The racecourse from the south-east Nottingham Racecourse from the south-east - geograph.org.uk - 652752.jpg
The racecourse from the south-east

The racecourse was in operation ante 1773 [1] at Nottingham Forest Recreation Ground when it was one of the earliest racecourses to be granted a Royal Plate race by the monarch. It was run in 4 mile heats by 6 year olds carrying 12 stone. [4]

The course moved to its present site in Colwick Park in 1892. [5] In 1965 the local corporation bought the 293-acre site for £500,000, and for a short time the future of the course looked in doubt. However, the Levy Board funded improvements to the site, and the corporation agreed to lease the course to the Racecourse Holdings Trust (predecessor of Jockey Club Racecourses) for a nominal sum. [5]

It staged both forms of racing until February 1996, after which it abandoned National Hunt racing to become a flat-only course. The racecourse was served by its own station up until the late 1960s, when the line was shut down. There are still remnants of the station wall on what is now Colwick loop road.

The course hosts two early-season Listed races – the Kilvington Stakes for fillies over 6 furlongs and the Further Flight Stakes over 1 mile 6 furlongs, named after the horse of that name. [6] It also hosts the listed Nottinghamshire Oaks over 1 mile 2 furlongs in the early Summer for fillies and mares. In total, it hosted 23 race meetings in 2017, at an average of £50,467 prize money per meeting. [7] Mr John Barnett was the courses longest serving employee; for over 25 years Mr Barnett served the course as a groundsman. On 9 June 2013, Mr Barnett's 65th birthday, he enjoyed his final raceday as a full-time employee of the racecourse, which was celebrated with a race named in his honour "Happy Retirement John Barnett handicap". The 8f race consisted of 14 runners and the winner Woody Bay trained by James Given and ridden by Graham Lee finished the race in 1m 46.78s.

Memorable events

The view from the outer straight start Nottingham Racecourse - geograph.org.uk - 651511.jpg
The view from the outer straight start

In April 2013, there was a triple dead-heat in a race at Nottingham, only the second time it had happened for over a decade. Horses Thorpe Bay, Majestic Manannan and My Time tied for fourth place in the Lodge Farm Stud Chris And May Mullin Handicap over 5 furlongs. [8]

Facts and figures

Notable races

MonthDOWRace NameTypeGradeDistanceAge/Sex
AprilWednesday Barry Hills Further Flight Stakes FlatListed1m 6f 15y4yo +
MaySaturday Kilvington Fillies' Stakes FlatListed6f3yo + f
JuneWednesday Nottinghamshire Oaks FlatListed1m 2f 50y4yo + f

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Cawston's Pride was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and broodmare. In 1970, she was unbeaten in eight races including the Queen Mary Stakes, Molecomb Stakes, Lowther Stakes and Cornwallis Stakes and was recognised as the outstanding juvenile filly of her generation. After winning Britain's first ever Group race, the Ascot 1000 Guineas Trial, on her debut as a three-year-old she developed temperament problems and was beaten when favourite for the 1000 Guineas. She refused to race on her only subsequent appearance and was retired to stud. She made an exceptional start as a broodmare, producing four stakes winners including the champion sprinter Solinus from four foals before dying at the age of eight in 1976. Cawston's Pride has been retrospectively rated the best two-year-old filly trained in Britain in the second half of the 20th century.

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References

  1. 1 2 Halpenny 1971, p. 193.
  2. 1 2 Timeform. Racecourse Maps Flat (Report). Portman Press. p. 10.
  3. Wright 1986, p. 202.
  4. Whyte 1840, p. 402.
  5. 1 2 Mortimer, Onslow & Willett 1978, p. 422.
  6. "British Flat Pattern and Listed Races 2010" (PDF). British Horseracing Authority. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 May 2012. Retrieved 21 May 2013.
  7. 1 2 3 "Racecourse League Tables". Racehorse Owners Association. 2013. Archived from the original on 14 April 2013. Retrieved 21 May 2013.
  8. "Course renowned for dead heats". Nottingham Post . 26 April 2013. Archived from the original on 12 May 2013. Retrieved 21 May 2013.

Bibliography