November

Last updated
<< November >>
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
01 02
03 04 05 06 07 08 09
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
2024

November is the eleventh and penultimate month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. Its length is 30 days. November was the ninth month of the calendar of Romulus c.750 BC. November retained its name (from the Latin novem meaning "nine") when January and February were added to the Roman calendar. November is a month of late spring in the Southern Hemisphere and late autumn in the Northern Hemisphere. Therefore, November in the Southern Hemisphere is the seasonal equivalent of May in the Northern Hemisphere and vice versa. In Ancient Rome, Ludi Plebeii was held from November 4–17, Epulum Jovis was held on November 13 and Brumalia celebrations began on November 24. These dates do not correspond to the modern Gregorian calendar.

Contents

November was referred to as Blōtmōnaþ by the Anglo-Saxons. Brumaire and Frimaire were the months on which November fell in the French Republican calendar.

Astronomy

November meteor showers include the Andromedids, which occurs from September 25 to December 6 and generally peak around November 9–14, the Leonids, which occurs from November 15–20, the Alpha Monocerotids, which occurs from November 15–25 with the peak on November 21–22, the Northern Taurids, which occurs from October 20 to December 10, and the Southern Taurids, which occurs from September 10 – November 20, and the Phoenicids; which occur from November 29 to December 9 with the peak occurring on December 5–6. The Orionids, which occurs in late October, sometimes lasts into November.

Astrology

The Western zodiac signs for November are Scorpio (October 23 – November 21) and Sagittarius (November 22 – December 21). [1] [2]

Symbols

Chrysanthemum Chrysanthemums.jpg
Chrysanthemum
Topaz crystal Topaze1.jpg
Topaz crystal
Citrine gemstone Citrine taillee.jpg
Citrine gemstone

November's birthstone is the topaz (particularly, yellow) which symbolizes friendship and the citrine. Its birth flower is the chrysanthemum. [3]

Observances

This list does not necessarily imply either official status or general observance.

Non-Gregorian

(All Baha'i, Islamic, and Jewish observances begin at the sundown prior to the date listed, and end at sundown of the date in question unless otherwise noted.)

Month-long

United States

Movable

First Sunday

First Monday

Tuesday after the first Monday

First Wednesday

First Thursday

First Friday

First Saturday

Second Sunday

Week of November 8

Week of November 11

Second Monday:

Second Saturday

Third Sunday:

Third week

Third Monday

Weekdays of the third week

Wednesday of the third week

Third Thursday

Third Friday

Third Friday until the next Monday

Saturday before Fourth Thursday

Last Week

Day before fourth Thursday

Last Wednesday

Fourth Thursday

Day after fourth Thursday

Fourth Saturday

Saturday after Thanksgiving

Fourth Sunday

Last Sunday

Monday after fourth Thursday in November

Fixed

Thanksgiving is celebrated in November Thanksgiving-Brownscombe.jpg
Thanksgiving is celebrated in November

Related Research Articles

April is the fourth month of the year in the Gregorian and Julian calendars. Its length is 30 days.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">August</span> Eighth month in the Julian and Gregorian calendars

August is the eighth month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. Its length is 31 days.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">December</span> Twelfth month in the Julian and Gregorian calendars

December is the twelfth and final month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. Its length is 31 days.

February is the second month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The month has 28 days in common years or 29 in leap years, with the 29th day being called the leap day. It is the first of five months not to have 31 days and the only one to have fewer than 30 days. February is the third and last month of meteorological winter in the Northern Hemisphere. In the Southern Hemisphere, February is the third and last month of meteorological summer.

January is the first month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. Its length is 31 days. The first day of the month is known as New Year's Day. It is, on average, the coldest month of the year within most of the Northern Hemisphere and the warmest month of the year within most of the Southern Hemisphere. In the Southern hemisphere, January is the seasonal equivalent of July in the Northern hemisphere and vice versa.

July is the seventh month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. Its length is 31 days. It was named by the Roman Senate in honour of Roman general Julius Caesar in 44 B.C., being the month of his birth. Before then it was called Quintilis, being the fifth month of the calendar that started with March.

March is the third month of the year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. Its length is 31 days. In the Northern Hemisphere, the meteorological beginning of spring occurs on the first day of March. The March equinox on the 20 or 21 marks the astronomical beginning of spring in the Northern Hemisphere and the beginning of autumn in the Southern Hemisphere, where September is the seasonal equivalent of the Northern Hemisphere's March.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">May</span> Fifth month in the Julian and Gregorian calendars

May is the fifth month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. Its length is 31 days.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">October</span> Tenth month in the Julian and Gregorian calendars

October is the tenth month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. Its length is 31 days. The eighth month in the old calendar of Romulus c. 750 BC, October retained its name after January and February were inserted into the calendar that had originally been created by the Romans. In Ancient Rome, one of three Mundus patet would take place on October 5, Meditrinalia October 11, Augustalia on October 12, October Horse on October 15, and Armilustrium on October 19. These dates do not correspond to the modern Gregorian calendar. Among the Anglo-Saxons, it was known as Winterfylleth (Ƿinterfylleþ), because at this full moon, winter was supposed to begin.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">September</span> Ninth month in the Julian and Gregorian calendars

September is the ninth month of the year in both the Gregorian calendar and the less commonly used Julian calendar. In the modern Gregorian calendar, its length is 30 days.

A common year starting on Friday is any non-leap year that begins on Friday, 1 January, and ends on Friday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is C. The most recent year of such kind was 2021 and the next one will be 2027 in the Gregorian calendar, or, likewise, 2022 and 2033 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. This common year is one of the three possible common years in which a century year can begin on, and occurs in century years that yield a remainder of 100 when divided by 400. The most recent such year was 1700 and the next one will be 2100.

A common year starting on Monday is any non-leap year that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is G. The most recent year of such kind was 2018 and the next one will be 2029 in the Gregorian calendar, or likewise, 2019 and 2030 in the Julian calendar, see below for more. This common year is one of the three possible common years in which a century year can begin on and occurs in century years that yield a remainder of 300 when divided by 400. The most recent such year was 1900 and the next one will be 2300.

A leap year starting on Sunday is any year with 366 days that begins on Sunday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are AG. The most recent year of such kind was 2012 and the next one will be 2040 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise 2024 and 2052 in the obsolete Julian calendar.

A leap year starting on Monday is any year with 366 days that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Tuesday, 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are GF. The current year, 2024, is a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar. The last such year was 1996 and the next such year will be 2052 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2008 and 2036 in the obsolete Julian calendar. 29 February falls on Thursday.

A leap year starting on Tuesday is any year with 366 days that begins on Tuesday, 1 January, and ends on Wednesday, 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are FE. The most recent year of such kind was 2008 and the next one will be 2036 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise 2020 and 2048 in the obsolete Julian calendar.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Public holidays in the United States</span> Holidays in the United States of America

In the United States, public holidays are set by federal, state, and local governments and are often observed by closing government offices or giving government employees paid time off. The federal government does not require any private business to close or offer paid time off, as is the case for most state local governments, so employers determine which holidays to observe.

Lists of holidays by various categorizations.

The following are 11 public holidays in Ukraine.

References

  1. The Earth passes the junction of the signs at 20:39 UT/GMT November 21, 2020, and will pass it again at 02:33 UT/GMT November 22, 2021.
  2. "Astrology Calendar", yourzodiacsign. Signs in UT/GMT for 1950–2030.
  3. "SHGresources.com". SHGresources.com. Archived from the original on 2012-09-11. Retrieved 2012-12-11.
  4. Jesuit Institute, November Lists, accessed 5 November 2023
  5. "Pulmonary Hypertension Awareness Month".
  6. NSFC Admin. "Stomach Cancer Awareness Month".
  7. "National Blog Posting Month". 6 October 2016.
  8. "National Homeless Youth Awareness Month (November 2015)".
  9. "November Is National Pomegranate Month!". Farmers' Almanac. Archived from the original on 2015-09-06. Retrieved 2015-11-02.
  10. "Home - Mitzvah Day".
  11. "November 10: World Keratoconus Day". Keratoconus Group.
  12. "NKCF, December 2016 E-Update" (PDF). National Keratoconus Foundation (NKCF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2017-10-06. Retrieved 2017-10-06.