Nudelman-Suranov NS-23

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Nudelman-Suranov NS-23
Sadyba MiG-15 NS-23.jpg
NS-23 cannons on a Mig-15 at Muzeum Polskiej Techniki Wojskowej, Warsaw
Type Autocannon
Place of origin USSR
Service history
Used by USSR
Wars Cold War
Production history
Produced1944–1953
No. built28,479
VariantsNS-23k
Specifications
Mass37 kilograms (82 lb)
Length198.5 centimetres (6.51 ft)
Barrel  length145 centimetres (4.76 ft)

Shell 23×115mm
Shell weight175 g (6.2 oz)
Caliber 23 millimetres (0.91 in)
Barrels1
Action short recoil
Rate of fire 550 rpm
Muzzle velocity 690 metres per second (2,300 ft/s)
Feed systembelt

The NS-23 was a 23 mm (0.91 in) aircraft cannon designed by A. E. Nudelman, A. Suranov, G. Zhirnykh, V. Nemenov, S. Lunin, and M. Bundin during World War II as a replacement for the Volkov-Yartsev VYa-23 cannon. It entered service in 1944. The NS-23 round was derived from the 14.5×114mm anti-tank round by necking it out to 23 mm.

A synchronized version, designated NS-23S (for synchronized), was used for fixed installations firing through the propeller arc.

Applications of the NS-23 included the Antonov An-2, Ilyushin Il-10, Ilyushin Il-22, Lavochkin La-9, La-15, MiG-9, Yak-9UT, Yak-15, Yak-17, Yak-23, and Tu-4. Some early MiG-15s were also equipped with the NS-23.

The NS-23 was replaced in service by the Nudelman-Rikhter NR-23 around 1949.

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