Nueces County, Texas

Last updated
Nueces County
Nueces county courthouse.jpg
The Nueces County Courthouse in Corpus Christi
Nueces County tx seal.png
Seal
Map of Texas highlighting Nueces County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Texas
Texas in United States.svg
Texas's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 27°44′N97°31′W / 27.74°N 97.52°W / 27.74; -97.52
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Texas.svg  Texas
Founded1847
Named for Nueces River
Seat Corpus Christi
Largest cityCorpus Christi
Area
  Total1,166 sq mi (3,020 km2)
  Land838 sq mi (2,170 km2)
  Water327 sq mi (850 km2)  28%%
Population
 (2010)
  Total340,223
  Density406/sq mi (157/km2)
Time zone UTC−6 (Central)
  Summer (DST) UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district 27th
Website www.co.nueces.tx.us

Nueces County is a county in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 340,223. [1] The county seat is Corpus Christi. [2] The county was formed in 1846 from portions of San Patricio County and organized the following year. [3] It is named for the Nueces River, which flows through the county. Nueces County is part of the Corpus Christi, TX Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Contents

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has an area of 1,166 square miles (3,020 km2), of which 838 square miles (2,170 km2) are land and 327 square miles (850 km2) (28%) are covered by water. [4] It borders the Gulf of Mexico.

Major highways

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1850 698
1860 2,906316.3%
1870 3,97536.8%
1880 7,67393.0%
1890 8,0935.5%
1900 10,43929.0%
1910 21,955110.3%
1920 22,8073.9%
1930 51,779127.0%
1940 92,66179.0%
1950 165,47178.6%
1960 221,57333.9%
1970 237,5447.2%
1980 268,21512.9%
1990 291,1458.5%
2000 313,6457.7%
2010 340,2238.5%
Est. 2018362,265 [5] 6.5%
U.S. Decennial Census [6]
1850–2010 [7] 2010–2014 [1]

As of the census [8] of 2000, 313,645 people, 110,365 households, and 79,683 families resided in the county. The population density was 375 people per square mile (145/km²). The 123,041 housing units averaged 147 per square mile (57/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 72.03% White, 4.24% African American, 0.64% Native American, 1.16% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 18.74% from other races, and 3.13% from two or more races. About 55.78% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Of the 110,365 households, 36.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.80% were married couples living together, 15.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.80% were not families. About 22.60% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.79 and the average family size was 3.30.

In the county, the population was distributed as 28.40% under the age of 18, 10.50% from 18 to 24, 28.90% from 25 to 44, 21.10% from 45 to 64, and 11.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $35,959, and for a family was $41,066. Males had a median income of $31,571 versus $22,324 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,036. About 14.70% of families and 18.20% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.00% of those under age 18 and 15.80% of those age 65 or over.

Communities

Cities (multiple counties)

Cities

Census-designated places

Unincorporated communities

Politics

Historically, Nueces County leaned Democratic in presidential elections, though in recent years has voted Republican. Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1952 became the first Republican candidate to carry the county. Prior to that year, the only times Nueces County did not vote for the national Democratic candidate was in its first presidential election in 1848 for Whig Zachary Taylor, and in 1860, supporting Southern Democratic John C. Breckinridge. Since Eisenhower's election, the only other Republicans to carry the county in the 20th century were Richard Nixon in 1972 and Ronald Reagan in 1984. So far, Bill Clinton remains the last Democratic candidate to win Nueces County, having done so in 1996.

Since 2000, Nueces County has voted for every Republican presidential candidate, with only George W. Bush in 2004 having carried it by a double digit margin, and his 56.8% of the vote is also the highest for any Republican in the county's history. In 2016, Donald Trump defeated Hillary Clinton in the county 48.6% to 47.1%, or 1,568 votes, the closest race since 1956.

Democratic strength is concentrated within downtown Corpus Christi plus the city's heavily Hispanic neighborhoods, Robstown, and communities in the western part of the county. Republicans generally do well in the southeast suburbs, Flour Bluff, and Port Aransas. [9]

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results [10]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 48.6%50,76647.1% 49,1984.3% 4,441
2012 51.0%48,96647.6% 45,7721.4% 1,366
2008 51.8%52,39147.3% 47,9120.9% 927
2004 56.8%59,35942.5% 44,4390.7% 762
2000 51.3%49,90646.6% 45,3492.1% 2,071
1996 40.2% 37,47053.7%50,0096.1% 5,689
1992 36.5% 36,78146.0%46,31717.6% 17,693
1988 48.3% 46,33751.3%49,2090.4% 386
1984 53.7%54,33346.2% 46,7210.2% 159
1980 46.8% 40,58650.1%43,4243.0% 2,634
1976 38.0% 32,79761.1%52,7550.9% 773
1972 55.4%41,68244.2% 33,2770.4% 291
1968 31.6% 21,30757.8%39,02510.6% 7,159
1964 25.8% 14,04874.1%40,4260.2% 84
1960 39.1% 18,90760.7%29,3610.2% 100
1956 49.9%19,98549.7% 19,9120.4% 162
1952 48.6% 19,12451.2%20,1560.2% 79
1948 25.6% 5,57770.0%15,2404.4% 966
1944 24.2% 3,81970.3%11,0915.5% 863
1940 23.9% 3,06575.8%9,7400.3% 37
1936 15.5% 1,23483.1%6,5971.4% 109
1932 12.6% 96786.9%6,6590.5% 36
1928 45.4% 2,48154.6%2,9850.1% 3
1920 21.6% 38370.1%1,2468.3% 148
1916 16.9% 40476.4%1,8306.8% 163
1912 6.5% 8569.6%91023.9% 312

See also

Related Research Articles

San Patricio County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

San Patricio County is a county in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 64,804. Its county seat is Sinton.

Refugio County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Refugio County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 7,383. Its county seat is Refugio. The county was created as a municipality of Mexico in 1834 and organized as a county in 1837.

Kleberg County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Not to be confused with Kleberg, Texas.

Kendall County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Kendall County is a county located on the Edwards Plateau in the U.S. state of Texas. In 2010 census, its population was 33,410. Its county seat is Boerne. The county is named for George Wilkins Kendall, a journalist and Mexican–American War correspondent.

Karnes County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Karnes County is a county in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 14,824. Its county seat is Karnes City. The county is named for Henry Karnes, a soldier in the Texas Revolution.

Jim Wells County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Jim Wells County is a county in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 40,838. Its county seat is Alice. The county was founded in 1911 and is named for James B. Wells, Jr. (1850-1923), for three decades a judge and Democratic Party political boss in South Texas.

Hidalgo County, Texas County in Texas

Hidalgo County is a county in the U.S. state of Texas. The county seat is Edinburg and the largest city is McAllen. The county is named for Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, the priest who raised the call for Mexico's independence from Spain. It is located in the Rio Grande Valley of South Texas and is one of the fastest-growing counties in the United States. As of the 2010 census, the population of Hidalgo County was 774,769, making it the eighth-most populous county in Texas.

Duval County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Duval County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 11,782. The county seat is San Diego. The county was founded in 1858 and later organized in 1876. It is named for Burr H. Duval, a soldier in the Texas Revolution who died in the Goliad Massacre.

Aransas County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Aransas County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 23,158. Its county seat is Rockport. The county was formed in 1871 from Refugio County and organized the following year. It was named for the Rio Nuestra Senora de Aranzazu, a Spanish outpost in early Texas.

Mathis, Texas City in Texas, United States

Mathis is a city in San Patricio County, Texas, United States. The population was 4,942 at the 2010 census.

Aransas Pass, Texas City in Texas, United States

Aransas Pass is a city in Aransas, Nueces, and San Patricio Counties in the U.S. state of Texas. The population was 8,204 at the 2010 Census.

Corpus Christi, Texas City in Texas, United States

Corpus Christi, colloquially Corpus, is a coastal city in the South Texas region of the U.S. state of Texas. The county seat of Nueces County, it also extends into Aransas, Kleberg, and San Patricio Counties. It is 130 miles southeast of San Antonio. Its political boundaries encompass Nueces Bay and Corpus Christi Bay. Its zoned boundaries include small land parcels or water inlets of three neighboring counties.

Solomon P. Ortiz American politician

Solomon Porfirio Ortiz is the former U.S. Representative for Texas's 27th congressional district, based in Corpus Christi, serving from 1983 until 2011. He is a member of the Democratic Party. In 2010, Ortiz was defeated by Republican challenger Blake Farenthold. Ortiz's son, Solomon Ortiz, Jr., is a former state Representative.

Area code 361

North American area code 361 is a state of Texas telephone area code for numbers in the Corpus Christi area. It was created prior to February 13, 1999, in a split from area code 512.

Coastal Bend Council of Governments organization

The Coastal Bend Council of Governments (CBCOG) is a voluntary association of cities, counties and special districts in South Texas.

Texas State Highway 361 highway in Texas

State Highway 361 or SH 361 is a state highway in San Patricio and Nueces counties that runs from Gregory in southern Texas, near Corpus Christi, east and south to Padre Island on the Gulf of Mexico coast.

Corpus Christi metropolitan area

The Corpus Christi Metropolitan Statistical Area is a metropolitan area in South Texas that covers three counties—Aransas, Nueces, and San Patricio. As of the 2000 census, the MSA had a population of 413,280.

The Corpus Christi-Kingsville-Alice Combined Statistical Area is made up of six counties in South Texas. The statistical area consists of the Corpus Christi Metropolitan Statistical Area the Kingsville Micropolitan Statistical Area, and the Alice Micropolitan Statistical Area. As of the 2010 census, the CSA had a population of 501,500.

Banquete is a census-designated place (CDP) in Nueces County, Texas, United States. Banquete is located at the intersection of State Highway 44 and FM 666, 23 miles west of Corpus Christi. Banquete should not be confused with Rancho Banquete, a census-designated place situated several miles west of the community.

History of Corpus Christi, Texas aspect of history

Corpus Christi is a coastal city in the South Texas region of the U.S. state of Texas. The county seat of Nueces County, it also extends into Aransas, Kleberg, and San Patricio counties. The population was 277,454 at the 2000 census; in 2006 the U.S. Census Bureau estimated the city's population at 285,175, making it the eighth-largest city in the state. It is the principal city of the three-county Corpus Christi Metropolitan Statistical Area as well as the larger Corpus Christi-Kingsville Combined Statistical Area. The translation from Latin of the city's name is Body of Christ, given to the settlement by the Spanish, in honor of the Blessed Sacrament (Eucharist). The city has been nicknamed The Sparkling City by the Sea, or "Corpitos" particularly in literature promoting tourism.

References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on October 18, 2011. Retrieved December 22, 2013.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. "Texas: Individual County Chronologies". Texas Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2008. Retrieved May 25, 2015.
  4. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved May 5, 2015.
  5. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved December 28, 2019.
  6. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 5, 2015.
  7. "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved May 5, 2015.
  8. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2011-05-14.
  9. Rohla, Ryne. "2016 Presidential General Election Maps". Ryne Rohla.
  10. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 6 April 2018.

Coordinates: 27°44′N97°31′W / 27.74°N 97.52°W / 27.74; -97.52