Oceania Women's Sevens Championship

Last updated
Oceania Women's Sevens Championship
FORU logo.jpg
Sport Rugby sevens
Founded2007
Countries15 (in 2019)
Most recent
champion(s)
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia (2019)

The Oceania Women's Sevens is the regional championship for women's international rugby sevens in Oceania. The tournament is held over two days, typically on a weekend. It is sanctioned and sponsored by Oceania Rugby, which is the rugby union governing body for the region.

Contents

Rugby sevens — also known as 7-a-side, or 7s — is a short form of the sport of rugby union that was first played in 1883. The first (men's) internationals took place in 1973. As women's rugby union developed in the 1960s and 1970s the format became very popular as it allowed games, and entire leagues, to be developed in countries even when player numbers were small, and it remains the main form the women's game is played in most parts of the world.

However, although the first women's international rugby union 15-a-side test match took place in 1982, it was not until 1997 before the first women's international 7s tournaments were played, when the 1997 Hong Kong Sevens included a women's tournament for the first time. Over the next decade the number of tournaments grew, with almost every region developing regular championship competitions. This reached its zenith with 2009's inaugural women's tournament for the Rugby World Cup Sevens, shortly followed by the announcement that women's rugby sevens will be included in the Olympics from 2016.

The first official regional 7s championship for international women's teams from Oceania was the Pacific tournament held in Port Moresby in 2007. This was followed by the Oceania Championship in 2008. The Oceania Women's Sevens has periodically served as the regional pre-qualifying competition for the Rugby 7s World Cup, or other sevens tournaments.

The following are details of all official regional women's international championships played in the Oceania/Pacific region since the first tournament in 2007, listed chronologically with the earliest first, with all result details, where known (included are the Oceania Women's Sevens and other official regional championships, e.g. the Pacific Women's Sevens tournament).

Honours

YearWinnerTournament locationRefs
Pacific 7s
2007 Flag of Fiji.svg  Fiji Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea [1]
Oceania 7s
2008 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Apia, Samoa [2]
2012 Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Churchill Park, Lautoka, Fiji [3]
2013 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Noosa, Australia [4]
2014 Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Noosa, Australia [5]
2015 Flag of Fiji.svg  Fiji Auckland, New Zealand [6]
2016 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Suva, Fiji [7]
2017 Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Suva, Fiji [8]
2018 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Suva, Fiji [9]
2019 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Suva, Fiji [10]
2020No tournament [11]
2021 Townsville, Australia

Pacific Tournament 2007

Played 1 and 2 December at Port Moresby, PNG (source IRB)

Classification Stages

Plate Final

Final

Oceania Championship and World Cup Qualifier 2008

Venue/Date: 25–26 July 2008, Samoa. This will be a regional qualifier for the Dubai tournament in 2009 (source FORU)

NationWonDrawnLostForAgainst
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 40014112
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 30112425
Flag of Fiji.svg  Fiji 2028964
Flag of Samoa.svg  Samoa 1036092
Flag of Niue.svg  Niue 0040221

Classification Stages

Semi-finals (winners go to Dubai)

  • Australia 29-0 Samoa
  • New Zealand 35-10 Fiji

3rd Place

  • Samoa 7-24 Fiji

Cup Final

  • Australia 22-15 New Zealand

Oceania Championship and World Cup Pre-Qualifier 2012

3–4 August 2012, Churchill Park (Lautoka), Fiji [12]

Fiji qualify for the Asia/Oceania final qualifier in Pune. Top four teams qualify for the Borneo Asia-Pacific Sevens.

Pool Stages

Finals

Oceania Championship 2013

5–6 October 2013, Noosa, Australia. [13] [14] Five teams attending.

NationWonDrawnLostForAgainst
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 40014312
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 30112431
Flag of Fiji.svg  Fiji 2029762
Flag of Samoa.svg  Samoa 01312121
Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg  Papua New Guinea 0137157

Oceania Championship 2014

3–4 October 2014, Noosa, Australia. [15] [16]

Day1
Day2
NationPlayedWonDrawnLostPFPADiff
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 660020531174
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 650119124167
Flag of Fiji.svg  Fiji 640218148133
Flag of Samoa.svg  Samoa 630355138-83
Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg  Papua New Guinea 630375134-59
Flag of the Cook Islands.svg  Cook Islands 600640172-132
Flag of Tonga.svg  Tonga 600631231-200

Notes: Samoa was ranked ahead of PNG due to winning their head-to-head match. There were no semifinals but the top two teams, New Zealand and Australia, played off in a final to decide the championship title.

Coral Coast Sevens 2014

The fifth edition of the tournament was held on 13–15 November 2014 at Sigatoka, Lawaqa Park, (Fiji).

12 women's teams and 24 men's teams were invited to compete for a total prize pool of $75,000. [17]

International matches:

New Caledonia lost in Bowl final; PNG won the Plate final; Fiji lose Vs Serevi Selects (mainly USA) in Cup semi-finals; Australia won Cup final 19-7 Vs Serevi Selects. [18]

Oceania Championship and Olympic Qualifier 2015

14–15 November, Auckland, New Zealand. [19]

2016 Oceania Championship

November 11–12, ANZ National Stadium, Suva, Fiji.

2017 Oceania Championship

November 10–11, Suva, Fiji.

2018 Oceania Championship

November 9–10, Suva, Fiji.

Related Research Articles

The Pacific Tri-Nations was the traditional rugby union series between Tonga, Fiji and Samoa. It was established in 1982 with the Samoan team, then known as Western Samoa, winning the tournament. In 2006 it was replaced by the IRB Pacific 5 Nations which was then renamed the Pacific Nations Cup.

The Tahiti national rugby union team is a third tier rugby union team, representing the island of Tahiti in French Polynesia, an overseas collectivity of France. They first played in 1971 and have played numerous games to date, most against rivals Cook Islands and several against Niue. Other games have been played against Samoa, Wallis and Futuna, Papua New Guinea and Tonga. France played a match against Tahiti at the end of their 1979 tour and won 92–12. Plans to have annual "test" match series against Pacific island neighbours, New Caledonia have been put on hold, due to time, availability, finances, and coaching and refereeing resources. They have yet to qualify for the Rugby World Cup. Rugby union in Tahiti is administered by the Fédération Tahitienne de Rugby de Polynésie Française. Currently, players who have represented or played for the Tahiti national rugby team, are eligible to represent France. However, playing at a professional level can only enable this. At present there are several Tahitian professional rugby players abroad in France's Top 14 and Pro D2 professional competition.

The Cook Islands is a third tier rugby union playing nation. They began playing international rugby in the early 1971. Thus far, the Cook Islands have not made an appearance at any of the World Cups.

The Papua New Guinea national rugby union team, nicknamed the Pukpuks,, played its first international in 1966, defeating Vanuatu 47–3. Papua New Guinea have not so far qualified for a Rugby World Cup. They participated in the Oceania World Cup qualifying tournaments for the 2007, 2011 and 2015 World Cups, but did not qualify.

Papua New Guinea womens national football team Womens national association football team representing Papua New Guinea

The Papua New Guinea women's national football team is controlled by the Papua New Guinea Football Association (PNGFA). Its nickname is the Lakatois, which is a Motuan sailing vessel. Their home ground is the Sir Hubert Murray Stadium, located in Port Moresby and their current manager is Peter Gunemba. Deslyn Siniu is the team's most capped player and top scorer.

Oceania Rugby

Oceania Rugby, previously known as the Federation of Oceania Rugby Unions (FORU), is the regional governing body for rugby union in Oceania. It was founded in 2000 to represent the interests of Oceania rugby within World Rugby, the international governing body. It presently encompasses fourteen full members and two associate members.

Oceania Rugby Cup

The Oceania Cup is an international rugby union competition for countries and territories from Oceania with national teams in the developmental band. It is administered by Oceania Rugby.

Papua New Guinea national rugby sevens team

The Papua New Guinea national rugby sevens team competes in the Oceania Sevens, where they finished third in 2009, and fourth in 2010, 2015 and 2016.

The Samoa women's national rugby sevens team is the fourth-strongest team in Oceania after New Zealand, Australia and Fiji.

The Papua New Guinea women's national rugby sevens team represents Papua New Guinea in international rugby sevens tournaments, particularly the Oceania Women's Sevens Championship and Pacific Games. PNG's first international was in 2007 while hosting the first ever Pacific women's sevens championship in Port Moresby. In 2017, the team participated for the first time in the World Rugby Women's Sevens Series as an invited team at the 2017 Sydney Women's Sevens. Papua New Guinea made its debut at the Women's Sevens World Cup in 2018.

Vanuatu Rugby Football Union

The Vanuatu Rugby Football Union, or VRFU, is the governing body for rugby union in Vanuatu. It was established in the 1960s, but only became fully affiliated to the International Rugby Board (IRB) in 1999.

The 2013 FORU Oceania Cup for national rugby union teams in the Oceania region was held in Papua New Guinea at the Lloyd Robson Oval in Port Moresby from 6 to 13 July.

Rugby sevens at the 2015 Pacific Games was held from 8–10 July at the Sir John Guise Stadium. In the men's tournament Fiji won the gold medal defeating defending champions Samoa by a 26 point margin in the final. Tonga took the bronze medal. Fiji also won the women's tournament, defeating Australia by a successful try conversion in the final, with hosts Papua New Guinea winning the bronze medal.

The 2015 Oceania Women's Sevens Championship was the fifth Oceania Women's Sevens tournament. It was held in Auckland, New Zealand on 14–15 November 2015. As well as determining the regional championship, the tournament was also a qualifying event for the 2016 Olympics sevens, with the highest-placed eligible team not already qualified gaining a direct berth to Rio de Janeiro.

The 2015 Oceania Sevens Championship was the eighth Oceania Sevens. It was held in Waitakere, Auckland, New Zealand on 14–15 November 2015. As well as determining the regional championship, the tournament was also a qualifying event for the 2016 Olympics sevens, with the highest-placed eligible team gaining a direct berth to Rio de Janeiro.

Oceania Rugby Women’s Championship is an international women's rugby union competition contested by women's national teams from Oceania.

The 2017 Oceania Sevens Championship was the tenth Oceania Sevens in men's rugby sevens. It was held at ANZ Stadium in Suva, Fiji on 10–11 November 2017. The tournament was won by Fiji who defeated New Zealand 26–0 in the final.

The 2018 Oceania Sevens Championship was the eleventh Oceania Sevens in men's rugby sevens. It was held at ANZ Stadium in Suva, Fiji on 9–10 November. Host nation Fiji won the tournament, defeating New Zealand by 17–12 in the final.

The 2019 Oceania Sevens Championship was the twelfth Oceania Sevens tournament in men's rugby sevens. It served as the regional qualifier for the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Sevens and was held at ANZ Stadium in Suva, Fiji on 7–9 November. A competition for deaf teams was also included as part of the 2019 Oceania Sevens.

The 2019 Oceania Women's Sevens Championship was the ninth Oceania Women's Sevens tournament. It served as the regional qualifier for the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Sevens and was held at ANZ Stadium in Suva, Fiji on 7–9 November.

References

  1. "Fijiana take Pacific women's Sevens". IRB. 2007. Archived from the original on 4 April 2008. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  2. "Oceania Sevens women's final". Oceania Rugby. 2008. Archived from the original on 27 February 2015.
  3. "New Zealand claim Oceania Women's Sevens Championship". Oceania Rugby. 2012. Archived from the original on 9 December 2013.
  4. "Women's Sevens Statistics - Day 2" (PDF). Oceania Rugby. 2013. Archived from the original (PDF) on 7 October 2013.
  5. "Fiji and New Zealand win the Oceania Sevens". IRB. 2014. Archived from the original on October 6, 2014.CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  6. "Australia and Fijiana Win Places at 2016 Olympic Games Sevens". Oceania Rugby. 2015. Archived from the original on 15 November 2015.
  7. "Australian women win Oceania rugby sevens". Special Broadcasting Service. 12 November 2016. Archived from the original on 9 March 2017.
  8. "Sevens Action to Return to Fiji in 2017". Oceania Rugby. 19 September 2017. Retrieved 20 September 2017.
  9. "Australia and Fiji triumph at Oceania Rugby Sevens". World Rugby. 10 November 2018. Archived from the original on 12 November 2018.
  10. "Season fixture: 2019 Women's Sevens". Oceania Rugby. Retrieved 4 November 2019.
  11. "Sport: Oceania Sevens for 2020 cancelled". Radio New Zealand. 8 September 2020. Archived from the original on 7 September 2020.
  12. Federation of Oceania Rugby Unions (August 4, 2012). "2012 Oceania Women's Sevens Championship Fixtures and Results" . Retrieved August 5, 2012.
  13. Federation of Oceania Rugby Unions (September 26, 2013). "World Champions New Zealand headline Oceania Women's Sevens Championship Line-up" . Retrieved September 30, 2013.
  14. "Australia win Oceania Women's Sevens title". irb.com. 6 October 2013. Archived from the original on 6 December 2013. Retrieved 6 December 2013.
  15. "Big Guns Progress on Day One at Oceania Sevens". Federation of Oceania Rugby Unions. 3 October 2014. Archived from the original on 21 February 2015. Retrieved 21 February 2015.
  16. "Fiji Crowned 2014 Oceania Sevens Champion". Federation of Oceania Rugby Unions. 4 October 2014. Archived from the original on 21 February 2015. Retrieved 21 February 2015.
  17. "Bayleys Fiji Coral Coast Sevens". Fiji Travel. 2014. Archived from the original on 21 February 2015. Retrieved 21 February 2015.
  18. "Aussie Pearls win Coral Coast Sevens". Australian Rugby. 16 November 2014. Archived from the original on 21 February 2015. Retrieved 21 February 2015.
  19. "Regional Sevens Olympic Qualifying Tournaments Schedule 2015" (PDF 0.2 MB). World Rugby. 2015. Archived (PDF) from the original on 8 May 2015. Retrieved 9 May 2015.