Oise

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Oise
Prefecture beauvais 2.jpg
Prefecture building in Beauvais
Blason departement fr Oise.svg
Coat of arms
Oise-Position.svg
Location of Oise in France
Coordinates: 49°23′N02°25′E / 49.383°N 2.417°E / 49.383; 2.417 Coordinates: 49°23′N02°25′E / 49.383°N 2.417°E / 49.383; 2.417
Country France
Region Hauts-de-France
Prefecture Beauvais
Subprefectures Clermont
Compiègne
Senlis
Government
   President of the General Council Yves Rome
Area
1
  Total5,860 km2 (2,260 sq mi)
Population
 (2016)
  Total823,542
  Rank 26th
  Density140/km2 (360/sq mi)
Time zone UTC+1 (CET)
  Summer (DST) UTC+2 (CEST)
Department number 60
Arrondissements 4
Cantons 21
Communes 679
^1 French Land Register data, which exclude estuaries, and lakes, ponds, and glaciers larger than 1 km2

Oise ( /wɑːz/ WAHZ, French:  [waz] ( Loudspeaker.svg listen )) is a department in the north of France. It is named after the river Oise. Inhabitants of the department are called Oisiens or Isariens, after the Latin name for the river, Isara.

In the administrative divisions of France, the department is one of the three levels of government below the national level, between the administrative regions and the commune. Ninety-five departments are in metropolitan France, and five are overseas departments, which are also classified as regions. Departments are further subdivided into 334 arrondissements, themselves divided into cantons; the last two have no autonomy, and are used for the organisation of police, fire departments, and sometimes, elections.

France Republic in Europe with several non-European regions

France, officially the French Republic, is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France in Western Europe and several overseas regions and territories. The metropolitan area of France extends from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea, and from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean. It is bordered by Belgium, Luxembourg and Germany to the northeast, Switzerland and Italy to the east, and Andorra and Spain to the south. The overseas territories include French Guiana in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans. The country's 18 integral regions span a combined area of 643,801 square kilometres (248,573 sq mi) and a total population of 67.02 million. France is a unitary semi-presidential republic with its capital in Paris, the country's largest city and main cultural and commercial centre. Other major urban areas include Lyon, Marseille, Toulouse, Bordeaux, Lille and Nice.

Contents

History

Historical population
YearPop.±% p.a.
1801350,854    
1821375,817+0.34%
1831397,725+0.57%
1841398,868+0.03%
1851403,857+0.12%
1861401,417−0.06%
1872396,804−0.11%
1881404,555+0.22%
1891401,835−0.07%
1901407,808+0.15%
1911411,028+0.08%
1921387,760−0.58%
1931407,432+0.50%
1936402,569−0.24%
1946396,724−0.15%
1954435,308+1.17%
1962481,289+1.26%
1968540,988+1.97%
1975606,320+1.64%
1982661,781+1.26%
1990725,603+1.16%
1999766,441+0.61%
2006792,975+0.49%
2016823,542+0.38%
source: [1]

Oise is one of the original 83 departments created during the French Revolution on March 4, 1790. It was created from part of the province of Île-de-France and Picardy.

French Revolution Revolution in France, 1789 to 1798

The French Revolution was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France and its colonies beginning in 1789. The Revolution overthrew the monarchy, established a republic, catalyzed violent periods of political turmoil, and finally culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon who brought many of its principles to areas he conquered in Western Europe and beyond. Inspired by liberal and radical ideas, the Revolution profoundly altered the course of modern history, triggering the global decline of absolute monarchies while replacing them with republics and liberal democracies. Through the Revolutionary Wars, it unleashed a wave of global conflicts that extended from the Caribbean to the Middle East. Historians widely regard the Revolution as one of the most important events in human history.

Provinces of France Former subdivisions of France

France was organized into provinces until March 4, 1790, when the establishment of the department system superseded provinces. The provinces of France were roughly equivalent to the historic counties of England. They came into their final form over the course of many hundreds of years, as many dozens of semi-independent fiefs and former independent countries came to be incorporated into the French royal domain. Because of the haphazard manner in which the provinces evolved, each had its own sets of feudal traditions, laws, taxation systems, courts, etc., and the system represented an impediment to effective administration of the entire country from Paris. During the early years of the French Revolution, in an attempt to centralize the administration of the whole country, and to remove the influence of the French nobility over the country, the entirety of the province system was abolished and replaced by the system of departments in use today.

Île-de-France Administrative region of France

Île-de-France is the most populous of the 18 regions of France. It is located in the north-central part of the country and often called the région parisienne because it includes the city of Paris. Île-de-France is densely populated and economically important: it covers only 12,012 square kilometres, about 2% of France's territory, but has an official estimated population of 12,213,364 and accounts for nearly 30% of the French Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

After the coalition victory at Waterloo, the department was occupied by British troops between June 1815 and November 1818.

Battle of Waterloo Battle of the Napoleonic Wars in which Napoleon was defeated

The Battle of Waterloo was fought on Sunday, 18 June 1815 near Waterloo in Belgium, part of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands at the time. A French army under the command of Napoleon Bonaparte was defeated by two of the armies of the Seventh Coalition: an army consisting of units from Britain, Ireland, the German Legion, the Netherlands, Hanover, Brunswick and Nassau, under the command of the Duke of Wellington, referred to by many authors as the Anglo-allied army, and a Prussian army under the command of Field Marshal Blücher. The battle marked the end of the Napoleonic Wars.

Great Britain Island in the North Atlantic off the northwest coast of continental Europe

Great Britain is an island in the North Atlantic Ocean off the northwest coast of continental Europe. With an area of 209,331 km2 (80,823 sq mi), it is the largest of the British Isles, the largest European island, and the ninth-largest island in the world. In 2011, Great Britain had a population of about 61 million people, making it the world's third-most populous island after Java in Indonesia and Honshu in Japan. The island of Ireland is situated to the west of Great Britain, and together these islands, along with over 1,000 smaller surrounding islands, form the British Isles archipelago.

Geography

Oise is part of the current region of Hauts-de-France and is situated 35 km north of Paris. It is surrounded by the departments of Somme, Aisne, Seine-et-Marne, Val-d'Oise, Eure, and Seine-Maritime.

Regions of France France top-level territorial subdivision

France is divided into 18 administrative regions, of which 13 are located in metropolitan France, while the other five are overseas regions. All 13 mainland administrative regions are further subdivided into 2 to 13 administrative departments, while the overseas regions administratively consist of only one department each and hence also coexist with administrative "overseas departments" of equal size. All administrative regions except Corsica, the French Guiana, Mayotte, and Martinique also correspond to a regional territorial collectivity since 1982, whereas the regional and departmental territorial collectivities of Corsica, the French Guiana, Mayotte, and Martinique have been replaced with single territorial collectivities.

Hauts-de-France Administrative region of France

Hauts-de-France is the northernmost region of France, created by the territorial reform of French Regions in 2014, from a merger of Nord-Pas-de-Calais and Picardy. Its capital is Lille. The new region came into existence on 1 January 2016, after the regional elections in December 2015. France's Conseil d'État approved Hauts-de-France as the name of the region on 28 September 2016, effective 30 September 2016.

Paris Capital of France

Paris is the capital and most populous city of France, with an area of 105 square kilometres and an official estimated population of 2,140,526 residents as of 1 January 2019. Since the 17th century, Paris has been one of Europe's major centres of finance, diplomacy, commerce, fashion, science, and the arts. The City of Paris is the centre and seat of government of the Île-de-France, or Paris Region, which has an estimated official 2019 population of 12,213,364, or about 18 percent of the population of France. The Paris Region had a GDP of €709 billion in 2017. According to the Economist Intelligence Unit Worldwide Cost of Living Survey in 2018, Paris was the second most expensive city in the world, after Singapore, and ahead of Zürich, Hong Kong, Oslo and Geneva. Another source ranked Paris as most expensive, on a par with Singapore and Hong Kong, in 2018.

Principal towns

Most Populous Oise communes [2]
RankCommuneCantonArrondissementPopulation
1 Beauvais Beauvais-1
Beauvais-2
Beauvais 55,252
2 Compiègne Compiègne-1
Compiègne-2
Compiègne 40,430
3 Creil Creil Senlis 34,262
4 Nogent-sur-Oise Nogent-sur-Oise Senlis 18,753
5 Senlis Senlis Senlis 15,583
6 Crépy-en-Valois Crépy-en-Valois Senlis 14,962
7 Méru Méru Beauvais 13,995
8 Noyon Noyon Compiègne 13,894
9 Montataire Montataire Senlis 12,843
10 Pont-Sainte-Maxence Pont-Sainte-Maxence Senlis 12,637

Politics

Current National Assembly Representatives

ConstituencyMember [3] Party
Oise's 1st constituency Olivier Dassault The Republicans
Oise's 2nd constituency Agnès Thill La République En Marche!
Oise's 3rd constituency Pascal Bois La République En Marche!
Oise's 4th constituency Éric Woerth The Republicans
Oise's 5th constituency Pierre Vatin The Republicans
Oise's 6th constituency Carole Bureau-Bonnard La République En Marche!
Oise's 7th constituency Maxime Minot The Republicans

Tourism

The major tourist attraction of the department is the Parc Astérix, which opened in 1989. Other very interesting sites are Beauvais Cathedral, the Chateau de Pierrefonds, restored by Viollet-le-Duc, and the art collection of the Château de Chantilly, which is one of the largest outside Paris.

Parc Astérix amusement park in France

Parc Astérix is a theme amusement park in France, based on the comic book series Asterix. With two million visitors yearly, Parc Asterix is the second biggest theme park near Paris after Disneyland and its 11 million visitors yearly. It is especially well known in France for its large variety of roller coasters, and has begun incorporating rides and themes from historic cultures such as the Gauls, the Romans, the ancient Greeks and recently the Egyptians, but always in the visual style of the stories. It is situated approximately 35 km (22 mi) north of Paris, 32 km (20 mi) from Disneyland Paris and 20 km (12 mi) from the historic Château de Chantilly, in the commune of Plailly, in the département of Oise. Opened in 1989, the park is operated by Compagnie des Alpes.

Beauvais Cathedral incomplete Roman Catholic cathedral located in Beauvais, France

The Cathedral of Saint Peter of Beauvais is a Roman Catholic church in the northern town of Beauvais, France. It is the seat of the Bishop of Beauvais, Noyon, and Senlis. Construction was begun in the 13th-century. The cathedral is of the Gothic style. It consists only of a transept (16th-century) and choir, with apse and seven polygonal apsidal chapels (13th-century), which are reached by an ambulatory.

Château de Chantilly castle in Chantilly, France

The Château de Chantilly is a historic château located in the town of Chantilly, France, about 50 kilometers north of Paris.

Renault FT light tank, in-service 1917–1949

The Renault FT was a French light tank that was among the most revolutionary and influential tank designs in history. The FT was the first production tank to have its armament within a fully rotating turret. The Renault FT's configuration – crew compartment at the front, engine compartment at the back, and main armament in a revolving turret – became and remains the standard tank layout. Consequently, some historians of armoured warfare have called the Renault FT the world's first modern tank.

Glade of the Armistice French national and war memorial in the Forest of Compiègne in Picardy

The Glade of the Armistice is a French national and war memorial in the Forest of Compiègne in Picardy, France, near the city of Compiègne and approximately 60 kilometres (37 mi) north of Paris. It was built at the location where the Germans signed the Armistice of 11 November 1918 that ended World War I. During World War II, Adolf Hitler chose the same spot for the French and Germans to sign the Armistice of 22 June 1940 after Germany won the Battle of France. The site was destroyed by the Germans but rebuilt after the war.

Château de Pierrefonds french castle

The Château de Pierrefonds is a castle situated in the commune of Pierrefonds in the Oise département (Picardy) of France. It is on the southeast edge of the Forest of Compiègne, northeast of Paris, between Villers-Cotterêts and Compiègne.

Twinned county

Oise is twinned with Bedfordshire. One of the villages along the river Oise is Auvers-sur-Oise, famous for having been visited by several impressionist artists. This is where Vincent van Gogh spent his last 70 days and is his and his brother Theo's resting place.

See also

Related Research Articles

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Marne (department) Department of France

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Eure Department of France

Eure is a department in the north of France named after the river Eure.

Seine-et-Marne Department of France

Seine-et-Marne is a French department named after the Seine and Marne rivers and located in the Île-de-France region.

Essonne Department of France

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Val-de-Marne Department of France

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Val-dOise Department of France

Val-d'Oise is a French department, created in 1968 after the split of the Seine-et-Oise department and located in the Île-de-France region. It gets its name from the Oise River, a major tributary of the Seine, which crosses the region after having started in Belgium and flowed through north-eastern France. Charles de Gaulle Airport, France's main international airport is partially located in Roissy-en-France, a commune of Val d'Oise.

Senlis Subprefecture and commune in Hauts-de-France, France

Senlis is a commune in the northern French department of Oise.

Oise (river) river in Belgium and France

The Oise is a river of Belgium and France, flowing for 341 kilometres (212 mi) from its source in the Belgian province of Hainaut, south of Chimay. It crosses the border with France after about 20 kilometres (12 mi). It flows into the Seine at Conflans-Sainte-Honorine, a north-western suburb of Paris. Its main tributary is the Aisne. It gave its name to the French departments of Oise and Val-d'Oise.

La Roche-Guyon Commune in Île-de-France, France

La Roche-Guyon is a commune in the Val-d'Oise department in Île-de-France in northern France. It is located in the Vexin regional national park.

Pontoise Subprefecture and commune in Île-de-France, France

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Chantilly, Oise Commune in Hauts-de-France, France

Chantilly is a commune in the Oise department in the valley of the Nonette in the Hauts-de-France region of northern France. Surrounded by Chantilly Forest, the town of 11,000 inhabitants falls within the metropolitan area of Paris. It lies 38.4 km north-northeast of the centre of Paris and together with six neighbouring communes forms an urban area of 36,474 inhabitants.

Louveciennes Commune in Île-de-France, France

Louveciennes is a commune in the Yvelines department in the Île-de-France region in north-central France. It is located in the western suburbs of Paris, between Versailles and Saint-Germain-en-Laye, and adjacent to Marly-le-Roi.

LIsle-Adam, Val-dOise Commune in Île-de-France, France

L'Isle-Adam is a commune in the Val-d'Oise department in Île-de-France in northern France. The small town beside the River Oise has a long sandy beach and attracts visitors from Paris.

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Carrières-sur-Seine Commune in Île-de-France, France

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References

  1. Site sur la Population et les Limites Administratives de la France
  2. "Insee - Populations légales 2013". Insee . Retrieved September 10, 2016.
  3. http://www.assemblee-nationale.fr/