Ole Danbolt Mjøs

Last updated
Ole Danbolt Mjøs
Ole Danbolt Mjos.jpg
Ole Danbolt Mjøs in 2004.
Born(1939-03-08)8 March 1939
Died1 October 2013(2013-10-01) (aged 74)
Citizenship Norwegian
Known forLeader, Mjøs Committee (1998–2000)
Leader, Nobel Committee (2003–2008)
Awards Order of St. Olav
Order of the Lion.
Scientific career
Fields Medicine
Physiology
Institutions University of Tromsø

Ole Danbolt Mjøs (8 March 1939 – 1 October 2013) was a Norwegian physician and politician for the Christian Democratic Party. A professor and former rector at the University of Tromsø, he was known worldwide as the leader of the Norwegian Nobel Committee from 2003 to 2008.

Career

Born in Bergen, he took the dr.med. degree in 1972. In 1975 he was appointed professor of physiology at the University of Tromsø. From 1989 to 1995 he served as rector there. [1]

Mjøs was also well known outside of his academic field. He chaired Kringkastingsrådet from 1990 to 1994, [1] and has held various political offices.[ citation needed ] From 1998 to 2000 he chaired the so-called Mjøs Committee, which delivered the Norwegian Official Report 2000:14, thus paving way for the so-called Quality Reform. [1]

From 2003 to 2008 he chaired the Norwegian Nobel Committee, which is awarding the Nobel Peace Prize. [1] Laureates during his times as chair were Shirin Ebadi (2003), [2] Wangari Maathai (2004) [3] the International Atomic Energy Agency and Mohamed ElBaradei (2005) [4] Muhammad Yunus and the Grameen Bank (2006), [5] Al Gore and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (2007), [6] and Martti Ahtisaari (2008). [7] In 2009, he was succeeded as leader by Thorbjørn Jagland. [8]

Mjøs was decorated with the Royal Norwegian Order of St. Olav and the Order of the Lion of Finland.

Mjøs died following a long illness on 1 October 2013, aged 74. [9]

Related Research Articles

Nobel Prize Set of five annual international awards, primarily established in 1895 by Alfred Nobel

The Nobel Prize is a set of annual international awards bestowed in several categories by Swedish and Norwegian institutions in recognition of academic, cultural, or scientific advances. The will of the Swedish chemist, engineer and industrialist Alfred Nobel established the five Nobel prizes in 1895. The prizes in Chemistry, Literature, Peace, Physics, and Physiology or Medicine were first awarded in 1901. The prizes are widely regarded as the most prestigious awards available in their respective fields.

Thorbjørn Jagland Norwegian politician

Thorbjørn Jagland is a Norwegian politician from the Labour Party. He served as the Secretary General of the Council of Europe from 2009 to 2019. He served as Prime Minister of Norway from 1996 to 1997, as Minister of Foreign Affairs from 2000 to 2001 and as President of the Storting from 2005 to 2009.

Norwegian Nobel Committee organization

The Norwegian Nobel Committee selects the recipients of the Nobel Peace Prize each year on behalf of Swedish industrialist Alfred Nobel's estate, based on instructions of Nobel's will.

Kaci Kullmann Five Norwegian politician

Karin Cecilie "Kaci" Kullmann Five was a Norwegian politician for the Conservative Party. She served as a Member of Parliament from 1981 to 1997, as Minister of Trade and Shipping in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs from 1989 to 1990 and as leader of the Conservative Party from 1991 to 1994. After she left politics in 1997, she held roles in private business, ran her own consultancy and was a board member of Statoil and other companies and organisations.

Fredrik Stang Norwegian politician

Fredrik Stang was a Norwegian law professor and politician for the Conservative Party. He served as a Member of Parliament, leader of the Conservative Party, Minister of Justice and the Police, Chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, and Rector of The Royal Frederick University. His father was Prime Minister Emil Stang and his grandfather was Prime Minister Frederik Stang.

Berit Reiss-Andersen Norwegian lawyer, writer and politician

Berit Reiss-Andersen is a Norwegian lawyer, author and former politician for the Norwegian Labour Party. She is chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, the 5-member committee that awards the Nobel Peace Prize. She is also a board member of the Nobel Foundation, which has the overall responsibility for all the five Nobel Prizes. She served as state secretary for the Minister of Justice and Police from 1996 to 1997 and as President of the Norwegian Bar Association from 2008 to 2012. She has co-authored two crime novels with former Minister of Justice Anne Holt. She is currently a partner at DLA Piper's Oslo office.

Geir Lundestad Norwegian historian and director of the Norwegian Nobel Institute

Geir Lundestad is a Norwegian historian, who until 2014 served as the director of the Norwegian Nobel Institute when Olav Njølstad took over. In this capacity, he also served as the secretary of the Norwegian Nobel Committee. However, he is not a member of the committee itself.

2009 Nobel Peace Prize

The 2009 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to United States President Barack Obama for his "extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between people". The Norwegian Nobel Committee announced the award on October 9, 2009, citing Obama's promotion of nuclear nonproliferation and a "new climate" in international relations fostered by Obama, especially in reaching out to the Muslim world.

Niels Christian Gauslaa Danbolt Norwegian academic

Niels Christian Gauslaa Danbolt was a Norwegian professor of medicine who was a specialist in skin diseases. Danbolt-Closs syndrome was named after him and Karl Philipp Closs.

Nobel Peace Prize One of five Nobel Prizes established by Alfred Nobel

The Nobel Peace Prize is one of the five Nobel Prizes established by the will of Swedish industrialist, inventor, and armaments manufacturer Alfred Nobel, along with the prizes in Chemistry, Physics, Physiology or Medicine, and Literature. Since March 1901, it has been awarded annually to those who have "done the most or the best work for fraternity between nations, for the abolition or reduction of standing armies and for the holding and promotion of peace congresses".

Student Peace Prize award

The Student Peace Prize is awarded biennially to a student or a student organization that has made a significant contribution to creating peace and promoting human rights. The prize is awarded on behalf of all Norwegian students, and is administrated by the Student Peace Prize Secretariat in Trondheim, which appoints a national nominations committee with representatives from universities and colleges in Norway, as well as an independent Peace Prize Committee that awards the prize. The award ceremony takes place during the International Student Festival in Trondheim (ISFiT).

The 2010 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to imprisoned Chinese human rights activist Liu Xiaobo "for his long and non-violent struggle for fundamental human rights in China". The laureate, once an eminent scholar, was reportedly little-known inside the People's Republic of China (PRC) at the time of the award due to official censorship; he partook in the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989 and was a co-author of the Charter 08 manifesto, for which he was sentenced to 11 years in prison on 25 December 2009. Liu, who was backed by former Czech president Václav Havel and anti-apartheid activist and cleric Desmond Tutu, also a Nobel Peace Prize winner, received the award among a record field of more than 200 nominees.

2007 Nobel Peace Prize

The 2007 Nobel Peace Prize was shared, in two equal parts, between the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and Al Gore "for their efforts to build up and disseminate greater knowledge about man-made climate change, and to lay the foundations for the measures that are needed to counteract such change".

The 2004 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to Wangari Maathai "for her contribution to sustainable development, democracy and peace".

2011 Nobel Peace Prize

The 2011 Nobel Peace Prize was jointly awarded to three female political activists. Two African and one Asian female were awarded for their persistence in obtaining equal rights for women.

2012 Nobel Peace Prize

The 2012 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to the European Union (EU) "for over six decades [having] contributed to the advancement of peace and reconciliation, democracy and human rights in Europe" by a unanimous decision of the Norwegian Nobel Committee.

2015 Nobel Peace Prize

The 2015 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to the Tunisian National Dialogue Quartet for "its decisive contribution to the building of a pluralistic democracy in Tunisia in the wake of the Jasmine Revolution of 2011".

2016 Nobel Peace Prize

The 2016 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to the President of Colombia Juan Manuel Santos "for his resolute efforts to bring the country’s more than 50-year-long civil war to an end, a war that has cost the lives of at least 220,000 Colombians and displaced close to six million people." The conflict is the longest running war, and last remaining guerrilla struggle, in the Americas. The Nobel Peace Prize is awarded annually to those who have "done the most or the best work for fraternity between nations, for the abolition or reduction of standing armies and for the holding and promotion of peace congresses". The announcement was made on 7 October at a press conference at the Nobel Peace Center, and the formal award ceremony took place on 10 December at the Oslo City Hall.

2019 Nobel Peace Prize One of the five Nobel Prizes

The 2019 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to the Prime Minister of Ethiopia Abiy Ahmed Ali "for his efforts to achieve peace and international cooperation, and in particular for his decisive initiative to resolve the border conflict with neighbouring Eritrea." The award was announced by the Norwegian Nobel Committee on 11 October 2019.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 "Mjøs, Ole Danbolt". Store norske leksikon . Kunnskapsforlaget. 2007.
  2. "The Nobel Peace Prize 2003". Nobel Foundation . Retrieved 20 October 2008.
  3. "The Nobel Peace Prize 2004". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 20 October 2008.
  4. "The Nobel Peace Prize 2005". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 20 October 2008.
  5. "The Nobel Peace Prize 2006". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 20 October 2008.
  6. "The Nobel Peace Prize 2007". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 20 October 2008.
  7. "The Nobel Peace Prize 2008". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 10 October 2008.
  8. Norwegian News Agency (3 December 2008). "Jagland blir leder av Nobelkomiteen" (in Norwegian). Archived from the original on 3 December 2008. Retrieved 12 December 2008.
  9. Jan Arild Holbek and Trygve W. Jordheim (1 October 2013): Ole Danbolt Mjøs er død Archived 2013-10-01 at Archive.today Vårt Land. Retrieved 1 October 2013 (in Norwegian)
Academic offices
Preceded by
Narve Bjørgo
Rector of the University of Tromsø
19891995
Succeeded by
Tove Bull
Other offices
Preceded by
Gunnar Berge
Chair of the Norwegian Nobel Committee
20032008
Succeeded by
Thorbjørn Jagland