Oleg Kopayev

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Oleg Kopayev
Personal information
Full nameOleg Pavlovich Kopayev
Date of birth(1937-11-28)28 November 1937
Place of birth Yelets, USSR
Date of death 3 April 2010(2010-04-03) (aged 72)
Place of death Rostov-na-Donu, Russia
Playing position Striker
Senior career*
YearsTeamApps(Gls)
1955 Spartak Yelets
1956 ODO Voronezh
1957 CSK MO Moscow 2 (0)
1958 SKVO Lviv 22 (6)
1959–1968 FC SKA Rostov-on-Don 257 (119)
National team
1965–1966 USSR 6 (0)
Teams managed
1969–1971 FC SKA Rostov-on-Don (assistant)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Oleg Pavlovich Kopayev (Russian : Олег Павлович Копаев; 28 November 1937 – 3 April 2010) was a Soviet football player.

Russian language East Slavic language

Russian is an East Slavic language, which is official in the Russian Federation, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan, as well as being widely used throughout Eastern Europe, the Baltic states, the Caucasus and Central Asia. It was the de facto language of the Soviet Union until its dissolution on 25 December 1991. Although nearly three decades have passed since the breakup of the Soviet Union, Russian is used in official capacity or in public life in all the post-Soviet nation-states, as well as in Israel and Mongolia.

Soviet Union 1922–1991 country in Europe and Asia

The Soviet Union, officially the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), was a federal sovereign state in northern Eurasia that existed from 1922 to 1991. Nominally a union of multiple national Soviet republics, its government and economy were highly centralized. The country was a one-party state, governed by the Communist Party with Moscow as its capital in its largest republic, the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic. Other major urban centers were Leningrad, Kiev, Minsk, Tashkent, Alma-Ata, and Novosibirsk. It spanned over 10,000 kilometers (6,200 mi) east to west across 11 time zones, and over 7,200 kilometers (4,500 mi) north to south. It had five climate zones: tundra, taiga, steppes, desert and mountains.

Contents

Honours

The Soviet Top League, known after 1970 as the Higher League served as the top division of Soviet Union football from 1936 until 1991.

Grigory Fedotov Club is a non-official list of Soviet and Russian football players that have scored 100 or more goals during their professional career. This club is named after first Soviet player to score 100 goals - Grigory Fedotov. The list was created by journalist and statistician Konstantin Yesenin and Football weekly magazine, though many other versions of this list exist.

International career

Kopayev made his debut for USSR on 21 November 1965 in a friendly against Brazil starring Pelé.

The Brazil national football team represents Brazil in international men's association football. Brazil is administered by the Brazilian Football Confederation (CBF), the governing body for football in Brazil. They have been a member of FIFA since 1923 and member of CONMEBOL since 1916.

Pelé Brazilian retired footballer

Edson Arantes do Nascimento, KBE, known as Pelé, is a Brazilian retired professional footballer who played as a forward. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest players of all time. In 1999, he was voted World Player of the Century by the International Federation of Football History & Statistics (IFFHS), and was one of the two joint winners of the FIFA Player of the Century award. That same year, Pelé was elected Athlete of the Century by the International Olympic Committee. According to the IFFHS, Pelé is the most successful domestic league goal-scorer in football history scoring 650 goals in 694 League matches, and in total 1281 goals in 1363 games, which included unofficial friendlies and is a Guinness World Record. During his playing days, Pelé was for a period the best-paid athlete in the world.

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