Oliver Emert

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Oliver Emert
Born(1902-12-09)December 9, 1902
DiedAugust 13, 1975(1975-08-13) (aged 72)
OccupationSet decorator
Years active1945-1969

Oliver Emert (December 9, 1902 August 13, 1975) was an American set decorator. He won an Academy Award in the category Best Art Direction for the film To Kill a Mockingbird . [1]

Contents

Selected filmography

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References

  1. "The 35th Academy Awards (1963) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Archived from the original on April 26, 2016. Retrieved May 12, 2016.