Onésime Reclus

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Onesime Reclus (1837-1916) Onesime Reclus Nadar GALLICA.jpg
Onésime Reclus (1837–1916)

Onésime Reclus (22 September 1837 [1] – 30 June 1916) was a French geographer who specialized in the relations between France and its colonies.

Contents

In 1880 he coined the term "Francophonie" as a means of classification of peoples of the world, being determined by the language they all spoke. [2] While this term did not appear in dictionaries until 1930, it has become more important since the late 20th century as part of conceptual rethinking of cultures and geography. [3]

Early life and education

Onésime was born as the middle of five sons of Jacques Reclus (1796–1882), a Protestant minister, and his wife. His brothers also became notable in their fields. His family had moved to Orthez from Sainte-Foy-la-Grande, where at least one of his brothers was born. His next older and younger brothers both became geographers:

Career

Reclus became a geographer. He was particularly interested in France and its colonies, which was the subject of his first book, published in 1873. By this time, France's colonies in Africa were more important than those in the Caribbean, and it had lost or given up those in North America by the early 19th century. But its history of deep involvement in colonial development in North America continued to influence its politics.

From 1869, Reclus was a member of the Société de Géographie. He was a contributor to the journal Tour du monde. [4]

In 1880 Reclus coined the term "Francophonie" as a means of classification of peoples of the world who spoke the French language. [5] He believed that people were connected by their language and culture, for instance, the continental French as well as French speakers in the Caribbean and Africa. While this term did not appear in dictionaries until 1930, it has become more important since the late 20th century as part of conceptual rethinking by historians, geographers, anthropologists and others of cultures and geography. For instance, there has been study of the state of Louisiana, and especially the city of New Orleans, as places of strong French-language culture. [6]

Reclus continued to be interested in issues related to France and its colonies, publishing a book on France and Algeria in 1886.

Selected writings

Marriage and family

He married and had a family. One of their sons was the noted historian Maurice Reclus  [ fr ] (1883–1972).

Related Research Articles

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Paul Reclus</span> French physician

Jean Jacques Paul Reclus was a French physician specializing in surgery. The Reclus' disease is named after him. He was the son of pastor Jacques Reclus and brother of Élie, Élisée, Onésime and Armand Reclus.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Élie Reclus</span> French ethnologist and anarchist (1827–1904)

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Jacques Reclus was a French Protestant minister.

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RECLUS is a public interest group founded in 1984, associated to the Maison de la géographie de Montpellier. The acronym translates to "Network for the study of changes in the locations and the spatial units" and was coined as a tribute to Élisée Reclus, the 19th-century French geographer, author of the New Universal Geography, a treatise in 19 volumes, published by Hachette, between 1876 and 1894. One of the most important ideas of Reclus is indeed the trans-boundary region, which is retaken by Roger Brunet, the founder of the RECLUS group and its director until 1991, in order to formulate the concept of the European Megalopolis.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Franz Schrader</span> French painter

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Francophonie</span> French-speaking world

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Fort Quélern

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References

  1. Christophe Brun, Federico Ferretti, «  Élisée Reclus, une chronologie familiale 1796-2014  »
  2. Lawrence D. Kritzman, Brian J. Reilly, M. B. DeBevoise, The Columbia History Of Twentieth-Century French Thought by
  3. Alexander B. Murphy, "Placing Louisiana in the Francophone World: Opportunities and Challenges" Archived 10 May 2013 at the Wayback Machine , published in Atlantic Studies, Volume 5, Issue 3, 2008; Special Issue: New Orleans in the Atlantic World, II, accessed 7 April 2013
  4. Les parlementaires de la Seine sous la Troisième République, by Jean Marie Mayeur, Arlette Schweitz
  5. Lawrence D. Kritzman, Brian J. Reilly, M. B. DeBevoise, The Columbia History Of Twentieth-Century French Thought by
  6. Alexander B. Murphy, "Placing Louisiana in the Francophone World: Opportunities and Challenges" Archived 10 May 2013 at the Wayback Machine , published in Atlantic Studies, Volume 5, Issue 3, 2008; Special Issue: New Orleans in the Atlantic World, II, accessed 7 April 2013
  7. Societes savantes (publications)