Ong Kham

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Chao Ong Kham
King of Luang Phrabang
King of Lanna
King of Luang Phrabang
Reign1713 – 1723
Predecessor Kingkitsarat
Successor Inthasom
Vice King Inthasom
King of Lanna
Reign1727 – 1769
Predecessor Thepsin
Successor Ong Chan
Born?
Chiang Hung (Sipsong Panna)
Died1769
Chiang Mai
Names
Samdach Brhat Chao Brhat Parama Khattiya Varman Raja Sri Sadhana Kanayudha
Father Indra Kumara (ruler of Chiang Hung)
MotherNang Gami

Chao Ong Kham (Thai : เจ้าองค์คำ; died 1769 in Chiang Mai), also known as Ong Nok, was the king of Luang Phrabang from 1713 to 1723, later the king of Lanna from 1727 to 1769. [1]

Ong Kham was a son of Indra Kumara, who was the king of Chiang Hung (Sipsong Panna)[ citation needed ] and also grandson of Sourigna Vongsa. [1]

Ong Kham was a cousin and also a son-in-law of Kingkitsarat.[ citation needed ] He seized the Luang Phrabang throne after Kingkitsarat in 1713. Ten years later, he was deposed by Inthasom when he was away on a hunting trip. [1] Ong Kham joint the monkhold for several years. After Thepsin assassinated the local Burmese governor, Ong Kham was offered the throne of Lanna in 1727.[ citation needed ] He ruled until his death in 1769.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Stuart-Fox, Martin. History Dictionary of Laos (3rd ed.). Scarecrow Press, Inc. p. 239. ISBN   978-0-8108-5624-0.
Ong Kham
Born: ? Died: 1769
Preceded by
Kingkitsarat
King of Luang Phrabang
1713 1723
Succeeded by
Inthasom
Preceded by
Thepsin
King of Lanna
1727 1769
Succeeded by
Ong Chan