Order of the Most Holy Redeemer

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The Order of the Most Holy Redeemer (also known as the Redemptoristines) is a Catholic female religious order. Their traditional habit is deep red, and the scapular and choir-mantle blue, [1] on the scapular there is a coloured medallion of the Most Holy Redeemer. The 15-decade rosary hangs at the side bearing a medal upon one side of which are embossed the emblems of the Saviour's passion. The nuns wear two veils: one white and another black, folded back over the head, but which may be drawn forward over the face and as far as the medallion on the scapular. Some houses wear a modified habit of a red dress, a black veil and a medal of the Holy Redeemer on one side and St. Alphonsus on the other that is suspended on a chain.

Catholic religious order religious institute of the Roman Catholic Church

A Catholic religious order is a religious order of the Catholic Church. According to the 1983 Code of Canon Law, they form part of a category of Catholic religious institutes.

Contents

History

Maria Celeste Crostarosa, the foundress of the order MARIACELESTE.jpg
Maria Celeste Crostarosa, the foundress of the order

The cradle of the Redemptoristines is Scala, not far from Amalfi, Italy. Thomas Falcoia, of the Congregation Pii Operarii , formed a community of nuns there and gave them a rule. Later he became Bishop of Castellammare. [1]

Scala, Campania Comune in Campania, Italy

Scala is a town and comune in the province of Salerno in the Campania region of south-western Italy. It is located on a rocky hill c. 400 m over the sea level and is part of the Amalfi Coast.

Amalfi Comune in Campania, Italy

Amalfi is a town and comune in the province of Salerno, in the region of Campania, Italy, on the Gulf of Salerno. It lies at the mouth of a deep ravine, at the foot of Monte Cerreto, surrounded by dramatic cliffs and coastal scenery. The town of Amalfi was the capital of the maritime republic known as the Duchy of Amalfi, an important trading power in the Mediterranean between 839 and around 1200.

Nun Member of a religious community of women

A nun is a member of a religious community of women, typically living under vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience in the enclosure of a monastery. Communities of nuns exist in numerous religious traditions, including Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Jainism, and Taoism.

He was director of Alphonsus Liguori when a new rule was approved by Pope Benedict XIV in 1750 and was said to have been revealed to Sister Maria Celeste Crostarosa. [1]

Alphonsus Liguori Italian Catholic bishop, spiritual writer, composer, musician, artist, poet, lawyer, scholastic philosopher, and theologian

Saint Alphonsus Liguori (1696–1787), sometimes called Alphonsus Maria Liguori, was an Italian Catholic bishop, spiritual writer, composer, musician, artist, poet, lawyer, scholastic philosopher, and theologian.

Pope Benedict XIV 18th-century Catholic pope

Pope Benedict XIV, born Prospero Lorenzo Lambertini, was head of the Catholic Church from 17 August 1740 to his death in 1758.

The bishop favoured the rule and asked Alphonsus to give the nuns the spiritual exercises and to organize the community as he judged best. Alphonsus set up observance of the new rule by meditation on the life and virtues of Christ. The details of their daily life were to commemorate phases of His life. Zeal was to be exercised by prayer, each day of the week being devoted to an object affecting the well-being of the Church, They were to pray in a special manner for the apostolic works of the Redemptorists. [1]

The institute began on 23 May 1731. A second monastery was founded by Alphonsus, when bishop, in his episcopal city, Sant'Agata de' Goti. The rule was approved by Benedict XIV in 1750. [1]

SantAgata de Goti Comune in Campania, Italy

Sant'Agata de' Goti is a comune (municipality) and former Catholic bishopric in the Province of Benevento in the Italian region Campania, located about 35 km northeast of Naples and about 25 km west of Benevento near the Monte Taburno.

Nearly a hundred years after the foundation at Scala, Joseph Passerat sent two ladies, Mlle. Eugénie Dijon and the Countess Welsersheim, to Sant'Agata dei Goti to learn the rule and spirit of the Redemptoristines. They received the habit at Rome from Cardinal Carlo Odescalchi. They founded houses at Vienna and Bruges. Convents of the institute now exist in Austria, Bavaria, Belgium, France, the Netherlands, Ireland, England, Tyrol, Spain, Canada, [1] the United States and Brazil.

Joseph Passerat was a French Redemptorist. He was declared venerable in 1980.

Carlo Odescalchi Catholic cardinal

Carlo Odescalchi, was an Italian prince and priest, archbishop of Ferrara, cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church and Vicar of the Diocese of Rome. Close collaborator of popes Pius VII and Gregory XVI, he renounced his titles in order to become a Jesuit in 1838.

In São Fidélis, Brazil, there still exists a traditional monastery [2] of the Redemptoristines that continues the original Rules and Constitutions with the approval of the Holy See.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Wikisource-logo.svg  One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain : Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Redemptoristines"  . Catholic Encyclopedia . New York: Robert Appleton.
  2. "Redemptoristines" . Retrieved 14 December 2017.