Ormur

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The Ormur (Pashto : اورمړ), also called Burki or Baraki (Pashto : برکي), is a Pashtun tribe mainly living in Kaniguram, South Waziristan, Pakistan, and in Baraki Barak, Logar, Afghanistan. [1] Many members of the tribe have settled in the Ormur neighborhood of Peshawar, and in Jalandhar, India.

Contents

Ormur is part of the Pashtun tribal system and identify with the Karlan confederacy of the region. The Pashtun warrior-poet Pir Roshan, born in 1525 in Jalandhar, India, belonged to the Ormur tribe. He moved with his family to their ancestral homeland of Kaniguram in Waziristan, from where he led the Roshani movement against the Mughal Empire.

Language and demographics

Ormuri [2] is the first language of the Ormurs living in Kaniguram and its vicinity in South Waziristan; today, all are bilingual in the local Pashto dialect of Waziristani (Maseedwola). Most can also converse in Urdu and some in English.

They are also found in Baraki Barak in Logar and in the outskirts of Ghazni in Afghanistan. However, Pashto and Dari have replaced Ormuri language there.[ citation needed ]

Notable personalities

Religion

Bayazid Pir Roshan, Pashtun Warrior/Intellectual, founder Roshaniyya (Enlightenment) movement. Descendants comprise the "Baba Khel" branch of the Burki Qaum (tribe).

Military

Sports

See also

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References

  1. http://tribune.com.pk/story/687192/isolate-language-from-the-mountains-of-waziristan-faces-extinction/
  2. Burki, Rozi (12 July 2001). "Dying Languages; Special Focus on Ormuri".

Further reading