Otis Lamson

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Otis Lamson
Otis Lamson.jpg
Lamson pictured in Yackety Yack 1908, North Carolina yearbook
Biographical details
Born(1876-09-13)September 13, 1876
Beetown, Wisconsin
DiedDecember 11, 1956(1956-12-11) (aged 80)
Seattle, Washington
Playing career
1904–1905 Penn
1906 Massillon Tigers
Position(s) Tackle
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1907 North Carolina
Head coaching record
Overall4–4–1
Accomplishments and honors
Awards
Consensus All-American (1905)

Otis Floyd Lamson (September 13, 1876 – December 11, 1956) was an American football player and coach, and also a surgeon. [1]

American football Team field sport

American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada and also known as gridiron, is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, the team with possession of the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with the ball or passing it, while the defense, the team without possession of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs or plays; if they fail, they turn over the football to the defense, but if they succeed, they are given a new set of four downs to continue the drive. Points are scored primarily by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

Contents

Early life

Lamson was born in Beetown, Wisconsin, in 1876. [2]

Football career

Lamson served as the head football coach at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1907. Prior to his coaching career, Lamson played college football while attending the University of Pennsylvania. He lettered for the Quakers in 1904 and 1905. In 1905, he earned All-American honors from Walter Camp. In 1906, Lamson was hired by the Massillon Tigers to play for the team in the "Ohio League" championship. During that two-game series, a betting scandal involving the Tigers and their rivals, the Canton Bulldogs, arose.

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill public research university in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, also known as UNC-Chapel Hill, UNC, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, or simply Carolina is a public research university in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. It is the flagship of the 17 campuses of the University of North Carolina system. After being chartered in 1789, the university first began enrolling students in 1795, which also allows it to be one of three schools to claim the title of the oldest public university in the United States. Among the claimants, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is the only one to have held classes and graduated students as a public university in the eighteenth century.

College football Collegiate rules version of American/Canadian football, played by colleges and universities

College football is gridiron football consisting of American football played by teams of student athletes fielded by American universities, colleges, and military academies, or Canadian football played by teams of student athletes fielded by Canadian universities. It was through college football play that American football rules first gained popularity in the United States.

University of Pennsylvania Private Ivy League research university in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

The University of Pennsylvania is a private Ivy League research university in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It is one of the nine colonial colleges founded prior to the Declaration of Independence and the first institution of higher learning in the United States to refer to itself as a university. Benjamin Franklin, Penn's founder and first president, advocated an educational program that trained leaders in commerce, government, and public service, similar to a modern liberal arts curriculum.

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
North Carolina Tar Heels (South Atlantic Intercollegiate Athletic Association)(1907)
1907 North Carolina 4–4–1
North Carolina:4–4–1
Total:4–4–1

Medical career

Lamson graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1907, after which he practiced medicine in Seattle for 41 years, until his retirement in 1952. [1] He was one of the best-known surgeons in the western United States. [1] [3] After his internship at Mercy Hospital in Denver, he received a fellowship to work at the Mayo Clinic. He then served at Doctors Hospital and Columbus Hospital in Seattle. [1] Lamson also served as the president of the North Pacific Surgical Association, [1] and he co-founded the Pacific Coast Surgical Association. [4] His professional interests included the treatment of achalasia. [5]

Mayo Clinic Nonprofit academic medical center based in Rochester, Minnesota, focused on integrated clinical practice, education, and research.

The Mayo Clinic is an American nonprofit academic medical center based in Rochester, Minnesota, focused on integrated clinical practice, education, and research. It employs more than 4,500 physicians and scientists, along with another 58,400 administrative and allied health staff. The practice specializes in treating difficult cases through tertiary care and destination medicine. It is home to the top-ten ranked Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine in addition to many of the largest, best regarded residency education programs in the United States. It spends over $660 million a year on research and has more than 3,000 full-time research personnel.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 "Dr. Otis Lamson Dies in Seattle". The Philadelphia Inquirer. December 13, 1956. p. 35. Retrieved September 22, 2017 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  2. The National cyclopaedia of American biography: being the history of the United States as illustrated in the lives of the founders, builders, and defenders of the republic, and of the men and women who are doing the work and moulding the thought of the present time, Volume 44
  3. "Death of Dr. Otis Lamson". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. December 12, 1956. p. 17. Retrieved September 22, 2017 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  4. "Dr. Otis Lamson Dies in Seattle". Honolulu Star-Advertiser. December 12, 1956. p. 17. Retrieved September 22, 2017 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  5. "Doctor Advises Rarer Surgery". Honolulu Star-Bulletin. August 19, 1929. p. 3. Retrieved September 23, 2017 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg

Additional sources