Otto IV, Count of Ravensberg

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Otto IV
Count of Ravensberg
Bornc.1276
Died 1328
Noble family House of Calvelage-Ravensberg
Spouse(s) Margaret of Berg-Windeck
Father Otto III of Ravensberg
Mother Hedwig of Lippe

Otto IV, Count of Ravensberg (c.1276 1328) was a German nobleman. He was the ruling Count of Ravensberg from 1306 until his death.

County of Ravensberg countship

The County of Ravensberg was a historical county of the Holy Roman Empire. Its territory was in present-day eastern Westphalia, Germany at the foot of the Osning or Teutoburg Forest.

Otto was the fifth child of Count Otto III and his wife Hedwig of Lippe (c.1238 5 March 1315), daughter of Bernard III, Lord of Lippe.

Otto III of Ravensberg Count of Ravensburg

Otto III of Ravensberg was Count of Ravensberg from 1249 until his death.

Bernard III, Lord of Lippe was a German nobleman. He was the ruling Lord of Lippe from 1229 until his death.

Marriage and descendants

In 1313, Otto IV married Margaret of Berg-Windeck. Together, they had two daughters:

Margaret of Berg-Windeck Countess consort of Ravensberg

Margaret of Berg-Windeck was a German noblewoman.

William II, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg German prince

William II, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg was the Prince of Lüneburg from 1330 to 1369.

Margaret of Ravensberg was the daughter and heiress of Otto IV, Count of Ravensberg and Margaret of Berg-Windeck.

Gerhard VI of Jülich, Count of Berg and Ravensberg was the son of William V, Duke of Jülich and Joanna of Hainaut.

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