Outremont (electoral district)

Last updated

Outremont
Flag of Quebec.svg Quebec electoral district
Outremont (Canadian electoral district).svg
Outremont in relation to other electoral districts in Montreal and Laval
Federal electoral district
Legislature House of Commons
MP
 
 
 
Rachel Bendayan
Liberal
District created1933
First contested 1935
Last contested 2021
District webpage profile, map
Demographics
Population (2016) [1] 102,088
Electors (2019)67,842
Area (km²) [2] 11.95
Pop. density (per km²)8,542.9
Census division(s) Montreal
Census subdivision(s) Montreal

Outremont is a federal electoral district in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, that has been represented in the House of Commons of Canada since 1935. It was known as Outremont—Saint-Jean from 1947 to 1966. Its population in 2006 was 95,711. Its current Member of Parliament is Rachel Bendayan of the Liberal Party of Canada. [3]

Contents

Demographics

According to the Canada 2011 Census [4]

Ethnic groups: 69.5% White, 6.9% Black, 6.7% Arab, 3.8% Latino, 2.8% Filipino, 2.4% South Asian, 2.1% Southeast Asian, 2.0% Chinese, 1.7% Indigenous, 2.1% Other
Languages: 47.9% French, 16.5% English, 5.4% Arabic, 4.8% Yiddish, 4.6% Spanish, 1.9% Portuguese, 1.8% Greek, 1.5% Romanian, 1.4% Tagalog, 1.3% Russian, 12.9% Other
Religions: 50.7% Christian, 11.0% Jewish, 9.5% Muslim, 1.3% Buddhist, 1.2% Hindu, 0.3% Other, 26.0% None
Median income: $22,551 (2010)
Average income: $39,486 (2010)

According to the Canada 2016 Census

Geography

The district includes the borough of Outremont, the eastern part of Côte-des-Neiges in the borough of Côte-des-Neiges—Notre-Dame-de-Grâce, and the western part of Mile End in the borough of Le Plateau-Mont-Royal, plus bits of upper Downtown Montreal in the borough of Ville-Marie, La Petite-Patrie in the borough of Rosemont–La Petite-Patrie, and Parc Extension in the borough of Villeray–Saint-Michel–Parc-Extension.

Political geography

In the 2006 election, the Liberals had their strongest support in Côte-des-Neiges, on the eastern slopes of Mont-Royal and in the small part of the riding in the Parc-Extension neighbourhood. The Bloc had its support concentrated in the borough of Outremont, and around the Université de Montréal. The New Democratic Party (NDP) won all of its polls in Mile-End where it obtained most of its polls. The Conservatives won just three polls in the riding all of which were around the western border of the Outremont border.

In the 2007 by-election, the NDP almost swept the riding. Their strongest areas were in Mile-End, Jeanne-Mance, and around the Université de Montréal. It was not uncommon for the NDP win more than 70% of the vote in these polls. The Bloc Québécois vote had collapsed, most of which went to the NDP. They did not win a single poll. Liberal support was relegated to the small part of Parc-Extension in the riding, the area around Rue Jean-Talon and the area on the opposite side of Mount Royal along Avenue des Pins. The Conservatives held on to one of their three polls.

In the 2008 election, the NDP held on to Outremont, albeit with a lower percentage of overall support.

Until the 2011 election, this riding was the only riding in Quebec to be held by the NDP. Mulcair held it since winning a by-election in 2007, earning a seat for the party for only the second time in history. He was challenged in 2011 by Liberal Martin Cauchon, who held this riding from 1993 to 2004 and was a former cabinet minister.

History

The electoral district was created in 1933 from parts of Laurier—Outremont and Mount Royal ridings.

This riding lost territory to Papineau, Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Westmount, Laurier—Sainte-Marie, Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Sœurs and Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, and gained territory from Laurier—Sainte-Marie, Westmount—Ville-Marie and Mount Royal during the 2012 electoral redistribution.

2007 by-election

After the resignation of Jean Lapierre on 28 January 2007, a by-election was called for 17 September 2007. In the by-election, this riding was won by the NDP candidate Thomas Mulcair.

Mulcair retained the riding for the NDP in the 2008 federal election, marking the NDP's first re-election and first general election victory in Quebec.

2019 by-election

Former boundaries

Members of Parliament

This riding has elected the following Members of Parliament:

ParliamentYearsMemberParty
Outremont
Riding created from Laurier—Outremont, Mount Royal and Saint-Denis
18th  1935–1940   Thomas Vien Liberal
19th  1940–1942
 1942–1945 Léo Richer Laflèche
20th  1945–1949 Édouard Rinfret
Outremont—Saint-Jean
21st  1949–1952   Édouard Rinfret Liberal
 1952–1953 Romuald Bourque
22nd  1953–1957
23rd  1957–1958
24th  1958–1962
25th  1962–1963
26th  1963–1965 Maurice Lamontagne
27th  1965–1967
 1967–1968 Aurélien Noël
Outremont
28th  1968–1972   Aurélien Noël Liberal
29th  1972–1974 Marc Lalonde
30th  1974–1979
31st  1979–1980
32nd  1980–1984
33rd  1984–1988 Lucie Pépin
34th  1988–1993   Jean-Pierre Hogue Progressive Conservative
35th  1993–1997   Martin Cauchon Liberal
36th  1997–2000
37th  2000–2004
38th  2004–2006 Jean Lapierre
39th  2006–2007
 2007–2008   Tom Mulcair New Democratic
40th  2008–2011
41st  2011–2015
42nd  2015–2018
 2019–2019   Rachel Bendayan Liberal
43rd  2019–2021
44th  2021–present

Election results

Outremont, 1968–present

Graph of election results in Outremont 1968-present (minor parties that never got 2% of the vote or didn't run consistently are omitted)
2021 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%Expenditures
Liberal Rachel Bendayan 16,71445.4-0.8
New Democratic Ève Péclet 9,57926.0+5.9
Bloc Québécois Célia Grimard5,53515.0+1.1
Conservative Jasmine Louras2,8827.8+1.3
Green Grace Tarabey1,1983.3-8.8
People's Yehuda Pinto8192.2+1.3
Independent Angela-Angie Joshi930.3N/A
Total valid votes36,82098.8
Total rejected ballots4561.2
Turnout37,27657.2-5.0
Eligible voters65,143
Liberal hold Swing -3.4
Source: Elections Canada [6]
2019 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%Expenditures
Liberal Rachel Bendayan 19,14846.19+5.76$47,498.81
New Democratic Andrea Clarke8,31920.07-7.45none listed
Bloc Québécois Célia Grimard5,74113.85+2.63$9,862.60
Green Daniel Green 5,01812.1-0.83none listed
Conservative Jasmine Louras2,7076.53+0.39$4,912.03
People's Sabin Levesque3690.89-0.65none listed
Rhinoceros Mark John Hiemstra1550.37none listed
Total valid votes/expense limit41,457100.0 $102,446.50
Total rejected ballots455
Turnout41,91262.2
Eligible voters67,842
Liberal hold Swing +6.61
Source: Elections Canada [7] [8]
Canadian federal by-election, February 25, 2019
Resignation of Tom Mulcair
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Rachel Bendayan 6,08640.43+6.97
New Democratic Julia Sánchez4,14227.52-16.60
Green Daniel Green 1,94612.93+9.32
Bloc Québécois Michel Duchesne1,67411.12+2.71
Conservative Jasmine Louras9256.14-3.39
People's James Seale2321.54-
Independent William Barrett480.32-
Total valid votes15,05399.11 
Total rejected ballots1350.89-0.08
Turnout15,18821.57-40.35
Eligible voters70,414
Liberal gain from New Democratic Swing +11.78
Source: Elections Canada [9]
2015 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%Expenditures
New Democratic Tom Mulcair 19,24244.11−11.57$101,332.88
Liberal Rachel Bendayan 14,59733.46+11.84$101,506.39
Conservative Rodolphe Husny4,1599.53+1.55$7,828.89
Bloc Québécois Roger Galland Barou3,6688.41−3.20$6,959.30
Green Amara Diallo1,5753.61+1.37
Libertarian Francis Pouliot2160.50
Communist Adrien Welsh1620.37
Total valid votes/Expense limit43,619100.00$204,392.07
Total rejected ballots4260.97
Turnout44,04562.42
Eligible voters70,559
Source: Elections Canada [10] [11]
2011 federal election redistributed results [12]
PartyVote %
  New Democratic 23,31755.68
  Liberal 9,05521.62
  Bloc Québécois 4,86011.61
  Conservative 3,3437.98
  Green 9372.24
 Others3620.86
2011 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%Expenditures
New Democratic Tom Mulcair 21,90656.37+16.84$80,457
Liberal Martin Cauchon 9,20423.69−9.39$51,130
Conservative Rodolphe Husny3,4088.77−1.76$18,319
Bloc Québécois Élise Daoust3,1998.23−4.32$10,456
Green François Pilon8382.16−2.15$4,578
Rhinoceros Tommy Gaudet1600.41 
Communist Johan Boyden1430.37 
Total valid votes38,858100.00
Total rejected ballots2910.74 +0.05
Turnout39,14960.46+4.35
Electors on the lists65,573
Source: Official Voting Results, 41st General Election 2011, Elections Canada
2008 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%Expenditures
New Democratic Tom Mulcair 14,34839.53−7.97$69,072
Liberal Sébastien Dhavernas 12,00533.08+4.12$45,118
Bloc Québécois Marcela Valdivia4,55412.55+1.62$48,279
Conservative Lulzim Laloshi3,82010.53+1.96$25,770
Green François Pilon1,5664.31+2.10not listed
Total valid votes36,293100.00
Total rejected ballots2530.69
Turnout36,54656.11+18.68
Electors on the lists64,556
New Democratic hold Swing −6.05
Source: Official Voting Results, 40th General Election 2008, Elections Canada.
Percentage change totals are in relation to a 2007 by-election, not to the previous general election.
Canadian federal by-election, September 17, 2007
Resignation of Jean Lapierre
PartyCandidateVotes%±%Expenditures
New Democratic Thomas Mulcair 11,37447.50+30.03$76,194
Liberal Jocelyn Coulon 6,93328.96−6.22$72,539
Bloc Québécois Jean-Paul Gilson2,61810.93−18.08$57,717
Conservative Gilles Duguay2,0528.57−4.16$66,401
Green François Pilon5292.21−2.61$169
neorhino.ca François Yo Gourd 1450.61$1,774
Independent Mahmood Raza Baig780.33$45
Independent Jocelyne Leduc610.25$6
Independent Romain Angeles460.19$157
Canadian Action Alexandre Amirizian450.19$0
Independent Régent Millette320.13+0.08none listed
Independent John Turmel 300.13none listed
Total valid votes23,943 100.00
Total rejected ballots175 0.73 +0.03
Turnout24,118 37.43 −23.35
Electors on the lists64,438
New Democratic gain from Liberal Swing −18.3
2006 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%Expenditures
Liberal Jean Lapierre 14,28235.18−5.76$69,816
Bloc Québécois Jacques Léonard 11,77829.01−4.24$63,590
New Democratic Léo-Paul Lauzon 6,98417.20+3.14$26,625
Conservative Daniel Fournier 5,16812.73+6.76$73,991
Green François Pilon1,9574.82+0.53$425
Indepenent Eric Roach Denis 1010.25$431
Progressive Canadian Philip Paynter940.23none listed
Marxist–Leninist Linda Sullivan880.22−0.09none listed
IndepenentYan Lacombe850.21none listed
IndepenentXavier Rochon340.08$572
IndepenentRégent Millette220.05none listed
Total valid votes40,593100.00
Total rejected ballots2820.69
Turnout40,87560.78−4.65
Electors on the lists67,253

Source: Official Results, Elections Canada and Financial Returns, Elections Canada.

2004 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%Expenditures
Liberal Jean Lapierre 15,67540.94−6.74$58,392
Bloc Québécois François Rebello 12,73033.25+4.96$63,640
New Democratic Omar Aktouf5,38214.06+8.48$11,371
Conservative Marc Rousseau2,2845.97−5.37$38,835
Green Shaun Perceval-Maxwell1,6434.29+0.54$475
Marijuana Yan Lacombe4521.18-1.39
Marxist–Leninist Linda Sullivan1200.31−0.18
Total valid votes/Expense limit38,286100.00 $73,313
2000 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%Expenditures
Liberal Martin Cauchon 18,79647.68−2.47$52,920
Bloc Québécois Amir Khadir 11,15128.29−0.10$50,207
Progressive Conservative Robert Archambault3,1908.09−4.12$3,360
New Democratic Peter Graefe2,1995.58−0.86$590
Green Jan Schotte1,4783.75$260
Alliance Josée Duchesneau1,2833.25$1,425
Marijuana Huguette Plourde1,0132.57none listed
Marxist–Leninist Louise Charron1940.49−0.36$10
Communist Pierre Smith1180.30$187
Total39,422100.00
1997 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Martin Cauchon 22,27150.15+3.34
Bloc Québécois Michel Sarra-Bournet12,60828.39−8.98
Progressive Conservative Marguerite Sicard5,42412.21+3.30
New Democratic Tooker Gomberg 2,8626.44+1.89
Natural Law Denis Cauchon8681.95+0.45
Marxist–Leninist Louise Charron3780.85+0.46
Total44,411100.00
1993 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Martin Cauchon 21,63846.81+12.10
Bloc Québécois Jean-Louis Hérivault17,27437.37
Progressive Conservative Jean Pierre Hogue4,1198.91−29.52
New Democratic Catherine Kallos2,1044.55−15.93
Natural Law Daniel Bergeron6941.50
Marxist–Leninist Michel Rocheleau1790.39
Abolitionist Sylvain M. Coulombe1310.28
Commonwealth of Canada Mamunor Rashid890.19−0.07
Total46,228100.00
1988 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Progressive Conservative Jean-Pierre Hogue 17,59738.43+9.15
Liberal Lucie Pépin 15,89534.71−6.21
New Democratic Louise O'Neill9,37920.48+1.82
Green Harriett Fels1,3422.93+0.42
Rhinoceros Milenko P. Miljévic1,0772.35−1.84
Communist Monique Marcotte2000.44−0.07
Independent Fernand Deschamps1830.40
Commonwealth of Canada Guy Huard1170.26−0.13
Total45,790100.00
1984 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Lucie Pépin 14,50840.92−30.57
Progressive Conservative Anne-Marie Sylvestre10,38329.28+21.96
New Democratic Johanne Beaudin6,68718.86+6.44
Rhinoceros Claude V.U. Hamel1,4844.19−2.235
Parti nationaliste Roger Lebeuf1,1853.34
Green François Lubrina8902.51
Communist Jocelyne Rioux1820.51+0.04
Commonwealth of Canada Christiane Deland-Gervais1390.39
Total35,458100.00
1980 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Marc Lalonde 23,00471.49−0.66
New Democratic Claire A. Brisson3,99612.42+2.09
Progressive Conservative Diane Chevrette2,3557.32+1.96
Rhinoceros Philippe Langlois2,0656.42−0.02
Independent Danielle Trudel2770.86
Communist Jocelyne Rioux1500.47+0.01
Independent H.-Georges Grenier1400.44
Union populaire Colette Picard-Desjardins1280.40+0.13
Marxist–Leninist Robert Wallace640.20−0.03
Total32,179100.00
1979 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Marc Lalonde 28,71072.15−0.15
New Democratic Claire A. Brisson4,11210.33−1.91
Rhinoceros Serge Beauchemin2,5646.44
Progressive Conservative Henriette Guérin2,1345.36−5.30
Social Credit Philippe Chartrand1,7654.44+2.09
Communist Jocelyne Rioux1850.46
Independent Fred Haight1220.31
Union populaire G. Spooner1080.27
Marxist–Leninist Robert Wallace910.23−0.86
Total39,791100.00
1974 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Marc Lalonde 20,40072.30+6.82
New Democratic Georges Louis Valois3,45312.24−3.74
Progressive Conservative Symone Beaudin3,00710.66+2.06
Social Credit Joseph-Endré De Csavossy6632.35−1.95
Independent Vera Jackson3991.41
Marxist–Leninist Micheline Mélanson2921.03
Total28,214100.00
1972 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Marc Lalonde 21,39965.48−13.18
New Democratic Henri-François Gautrin5,22315.98+4.58
Progressive Conservative André Poitras2,8118.60−1.34
Rhinoceros Réginald Martel1,5654.79
Social Credit Maurice Benoit1,4044.30
Independent Harold J. Glick1680.51
Independent H.-Georges Grenier1090.33
Total32,679100.00
1968 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Aurélien Noël 24,21978.66+23.99
New Democratic Saul Handelman3,51111.40−31.03
Progressive Conservative Neil Morrison3,0599.94
Total30,789100.00

Outremont—Saint-Jean, 1949–1968

Canadian federal by-election, 29 May 1967
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
On Mr. Lamontagne's resignation, 4 June 1967
Liberal Aurélien Noël 6,26254.67%+2.10%
New Democratic Denis Lazure4,86042.43%+25.89%
 Esprit socialHenri-Georges Grenier2141.87%−0.19%
Rhinoceros F.-L.-M. Bonnier1181.03%
Total valid votes11,454100.00%
1965 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Maurice Lamontagne 11,85552.57%−4.06%
New Democratic Monique Ferron3,73016.54%−1.45%
Progressive Conservative Albert Guilbeault3,24114.37%−5.56%
Ralliement créditiste André Poitras3,25914.45%+9.01%2.06%
 Droit vital personnelHenri-Georges Grenier4652.06%
Total valid votes22,550100.00%

Note: Ralliement créditiste vote is compared to Social Credit vote in the 1963 election.

1963 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Maurice Lamontagne 13,30556.63%+9.55%
Progressive Conservative Marc Lacoste4,68419.94%−10.28%
New Democratic Thérèse Casgrain 4,22717.99%−2.02%
Social Credit Léopold Savard1,2785.44%+2.76%
Total valid votes23,494100.00%
1962 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Romuald Bourque 10,13447.08%−8.51%
Progressive Conservative Marc Lacoste6,50430.22%−8.72%
New Democratic Thérèse Casgrain 4,30820.02%+14.55%
Social Credit Jean-Guy Laprise5772.68%
Total valid votes21,523100.00%

Note: NDP vote is compared to CCF vote in 1958 election.

1958 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Romuald Bourque 12,71555.60%−17.10%
Progressive Conservative Conrad Archambault8,90638.94%+18.46%
Co-operative Commonwealth Gaston Miron 1,2495.46%−1.36%
Total valid votes22,870100.00%
1957 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Romuald Bourque 13,84072.70%+3.92%
Progressive Conservative René Dostaler3,89920.48%−4.65%
Co-operative Commonwealth Gaston Miron 1,2996.82%+4.22%
Total valid votes19,038100.00%
1953 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Romuald Bourque 11,53668.77%+12.75%
Progressive Conservative Gaston Sylvestre4,21625.13%−3.37%
Co-operative Commonwealth Pierre-D. Gagnon4362.60%−7.50%
Labor–Progressive Anne Eizner4062.42%
 Independent Progressive ConservativeHomère Louiselle1801.07%
Total valid votes16,774100.00%
Canadian federal by-election, 6 October 1952
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
On Mr. Rinfret being appointed Puisne Judge, Court of Queen's Bench, Quebec, 12 February 1952
Liberal Romuald Bourque6,29456.02%−20.30%
Progressive Conservative Claude Nolin3,20328.51%+4.83%
Co-operative Commonwealth Thérèse Casgrain 1,13510.10%
 Independent LiberalRaymond Bourque4423.93%
Independent Ben Ash1611.43%
Total valid votes11,235100.00%
1949 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Édouard Rinfret 16,21576.32%+20.28%
Progressive Conservative Alphonse Bélanger5,03023.68%+9.51%
Total valid votes21,245100.00%

Outremont, 1935–1949

1945 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Édouard-Gabriel Rinfret 14,83656.04%−8.01%
Progressive Conservative Joseph Hector Bender3,75014.17%
Bloc populaire Joseph-Alfred Goyer3,25912.31%
Independent LiberalJohn P. Callaghan1,7626.66%
Co-operative Commonwealth Abraham Jacob Rosenstein1,6396.19%
Labor–Progressive Gertrude Partridge1,2274.63%
Total valid votes26,473100.00%
Canadian federal by-election, 30 November 1942
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
On Mr. Vien's resignation, 5 October 1942
Liberal Léo Richer Laflèche 12,37864.05%−2.35%
Bloc populaire Jean Drapeau 6,94835.95%
Total valid votes19,326100.00%
1940 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Thomas Vien 14,51166.40%10.50%
National Government Joseph-Hector Bender4,55620.85%−14.10%
Independent LiberalErnest Poulin2,78712.75%
Total valid votes21,854100.00%

Note: "National Government" vote is compared to Conservative vote in 1935 election.

1935 Canadian federal election
PartyCandidateVotes%
Liberal Thomas Vien 11,26055.90%
Conservative Jean-Joseph Penverne7,04034.95%
Reconstruction Hervé Roch1,8449.15%
Total valid votes20,144100.00%

See also

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Outremont was a provincial electoral district in the city of Montreal in Quebec, Canada. It comprised all of the borough of Outremont and parts of the boroughs of Le Plateau-Mont-Royal, Côte-des-Neiges–Notre-Dame-de-Grâce and a very small part of Ville-Marie.

Alexandre Boulerice Canadian politician

Alexandre Boulerice is a Canadian politician who has represented the riding of Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie in the House of Commons of Canada as a member of the New Democratic Party (NDP) since the 2011 election. He is currently the NDP's Quebec lieutenant and ethics critic. Boulerice was appointed as the Deputy Leader of the New Democratic Party on March 11, 2019, by party leader Jagmeet Singh. As of the 2019 federal election, Boulerice is the only NDP MP from Quebec.

Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Westmount Federal electoral district in Quebec, Canada

Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Westmount is a federal electoral district in Quebec. It encompasses areas formerly included in the electoral districts of Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine (40%), Westmount—Ville-Marie (59%) and Outremont (1%).

Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Sœurs Federal electoral district in Quebec, Canada

Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Sœurs is a federal electoral district in Quebec, Canada, that has been represented in the House of Commons of Canada since 2015. It encompasses a portion of Quebec formerly included in the electoral districts of Jeanne-Le Ber, Westmount—Ville-Marie, Laurier—Sainte-Marie and Outremont.

2019 Outremont federal by-election

A by-election was held in the federal riding of Outremont in Quebec on February 25, 2019 following the resignation of incumbent New Democratic MP Tom Mulcair. After 12 years in Parliament, the former Leader of the Official Opposition announced that he would resign his seat.

2021 Montreal municipal election

Municipal elections were held in the city of Montreal, Quebec, Canada on November 7, 2021, as part of the 2021 Quebec municipal elections. Voters elected 103 representatives in a first-past-the-post electoral system. The general election decides the majority composition of the city council and each of the 19 borough councils. The newly elected mayor appoints 2 city councillors for the Ville-Marie borough. In total, 18 borough mayors, 46 city councillors and 38 borough councillors were elected.

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Coordinates: 45°30′30″N73°36′30″W / 45.50833°N 73.60833°W / 45.50833; -73.60833