Overton Peak

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Overton Peak is a peak in the Desko Mountains, rising to about 550 metres (1,800 ft) at the southeast end of Rothschild Island. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names after Commander Robert H. Overton, U.S. Coast Guard, Executive Officer, USCGC Westwind, U.S. Navy Operation Deep Freeze, 1971. [1]

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Further reading

• J.L. SMELLIE, Lithostratigraphy of Miocene-Recent, alkaline volcanic fields in the Antarctic Peninsula and eastern Ellsworth Land , Antarctic Science 71 (3): 362-378 (1999)

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References

  1. "Overton Peak". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved 2012-01-13.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Overton Peak" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

Coordinates: 69°41′S71°58′W / 69.683°S 71.967°W / -69.683; -71.967