Owen Reynolds

Last updated
Owen Reynolds
No. 17
Position: End, tackle
Personal information
Born:(1900-01-12)January 12, 1900
Douglasville, Georgia
Died:March 11, 1984(1984-03-11) (aged 84)
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:212 lb (96 kg)
Career information
High school:Douglas Academy
Douglasville, Georgia
College: Georgia
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Owen Gaston Reynolds (January 12, 1900 March 11, 1984) was an American football player in the National Football League (NFL). [1] Reynolds played college football for the Georgia Bulldogs of the University of Georgia, receiving All-Southern honors in 1919, 1920, and 1921. [2] In the 1920 season, he was only knocked off his feet once. Virginia used three men to knock him down. [3] He was captain of the 1921 team. He was nominated though not selected for an Associated Press All-Time Southeast 1869-1919 era team. [4] In 1925 he played for the New York Giants in their inaugural season, making him the first Bulldog to play in the NFL. [5]

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References

  1. "Owen Gaston Reynolds".
  2. 2013 Georgia Bulldogs Football Media Guide. p. 175.
  3. "Picking All-Southern Aggregation Is Hardest Task Ever Confronting Perspiring Scriveners of Section". Atlanta Constitution. November 28, 1920. p. 3. Retrieved May 14, 2015 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  4. "U-T Greats On All-Time Southeast Team". Kingsport Post. July 31, 1969.
  5. Magill, Dan (August 30, 2008). "Magill: Kasay about to start a Georgia-record 18th NFL year". onlineathens.com.