Pakistan Standard Time

Last updated
Pakistan Standard Time
time zone
Pakistan Time Zone.jpg
  Pakistan Standard Time
UTC offset
PKT UTC+05:00
Current time
08:49, 5 June 2021 PKT [refresh]
Observance of DST
DST is not observed in this time zone.

Pakistan Standard Time (Urdu : پاکستان معیاری وقت, abbreviated as PKT) is UTC+05:00 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. The time zone is in use during standard time in Asia.

Contents

History

UTC+05:00 2010: Blue (December), Orange (June), Yellow (all year round), Light Blue - Sea areas Timezones2014 UTC+5.png
UTC+05:00 2010: Blue (December), Orange (June), Yellow (all year round), Light Blue - Sea areas

Pakistan had been following UTC+05:30 since 1907 (during the British Raj) and continued using it after independence in 1947. On 15 September 1951, following the findings of mathematician Mahmood Anwar, two time zones were introduced. Karachi Time (KART) was introduced in West Pakistan by adjusting 30 minutes off UTC+05:30 to UTC+05:00, while Dacca Time (DACT) was introduced in East Pakistan by subtracting 30 minutes off UTC+06:30 to UTC+06:00. The changes were made effective on 30, September 1951. [1] PKT is measured in Shakargarh at 75.00 degrees latitude. In 1971, Karachi Time was renamed to Pakistan Standard Time.

Daylight saving time

Daylight saving time is no longer observed in Pakistan. [2]

See also

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Time in Pakistan Time zone in Asia

Pakistan uses one time zone, which is Pakistan Standard Time (PKT). This is UTC+05:00 — that is, five hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time.

Pakistan has experimented with Daylight Saving Time (DST) a number of times since 2002, shifting local time from UTC+05:00 to UTC+06:00 during various summer periods.

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Daylight saving time in Asia

As of 2017, daylight saving time is used in the following Asian countries:

Time in Portugal

Portugal has two time zones and observes daylight saving time. Continental Portugal and Madeira use UTC+00:00, while the Azores use UTC–01:00. Daylight saving time is observed nationwide from the last Sunday in March to the last Sunday in October, so that every year, continental Portugal and Madeira temporarily use UTC+01:00, and the Azores temporarily use UTC+00:00.

References

  1. "1951". pakistanspace.tripod.com.
  2. Gap analysis on Energy Efficiency institutional arrangements in Pakistan, Asif Masood, pp.44, 2010, UN ESCAP (Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific), United Nations, "…In 2002, Pakistan introduced Daylight Savings Time[ sic ] (DST)…met with public controversy and resistance was discontinued the same year. During the energy crisis of 2007–2008, the Government once again announced DST during summer season. It was implemented for almost two years before it was discontinued in 2010 because of the same public controversy and resistance…"