Panama women's national football team

Last updated
Panama
Association Federación Panameña de Fútbol
Confederation CONCACAF
Head coach Victor Suarez
Most caps Raiza Gutierrez
FIFA code PAN
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Kit body Pana2009-.png
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First colours
Kit left arm Panam3(2).png
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Kit body Pana2009-(2).png
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Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 54 Increase2.svg 12 (7 December 2018) [1]
Highest54 (December 2018)
Lowest140 (December 2015)
First international
Flag of Guatemala.svg  Guatemala 1–2 Panama  Flag of Panama.svg
(San Salvador, El Salvador; 28 July 2002)
Biggest win
Flag of Panama.svg  Panama 15–2 Belize  Flag of Belize.svg
(Guatemala City, Guatemala; 21 November 2003)
Biggest defeat
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 9–0 Panama  Flag of Panama.svg
(Seattle, United States; 2 November 2002)
CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup
Appearances3 (first in 2002 )
Best result4th place (2018)

The Panama women's national football team is overseen by the Federación Panameña de Fútbol. After a 12 year absence, the team will return to the CONCACAF Women's Championship in 2018 after finishing second in UNCAF zone qualifying.

The CONCACAF Women's Championship, in some years called the CONCACAFWomen'sGoldCup or the CONCACAFWomen'sWorldCupqualifying, is a football competition organized by CONCACAF that often serves as the qualifying competition to the Women's World Cup. In years when the tournament has been held outside the World Cup qualifying cycle, non-CONCACAF members have been invited. CONCACAF is the governing body for football for North America, Central America and the Caribbean. The most successful country has been the United States, winning their eighth title in 2018.

Central American Football Union sports governing body

The Unión Centroamericana de Fútbol, more commonly known by the acronym UNCAF, represents the national football teams of Central America: Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama. Its member associations are part of CONCACAF.

Contents

History

2000s

In 2002 Panama qualified for the CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup for the first time after securing one of two spots in Central American Zone qualifying. They went 1–0–2 at the 2002 CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup and did not qualify for the knockout round. [2]

The 2002 CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup was the second staging of the CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup. It was held in Seattle, Washington, United States and Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Panama once again qualified for the Women's Gold Cup in 2006 after winning their qualifying group. Panama lost their first round match 2–1 to Jamaica and were eliminated. [3]

2006 CONCACAF Womens Gold Cup

The 2006 CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup was the third edition of the CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup, and also acted as a qualifier tournament for the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup. The tournament finals took place in the United States of America between 19 November and 27 November 2006. The USA and Canada received byes into the tournament after contesting the final of the 2002 Gold Cup, while four other spots were determined through regional qualification.

Jamaica women's national football team is nicknamed the 'Reggae Girlz'. They are one of the top women's national football teams in the Caribbean region along with Trinidad and Tobago and Haiti. In 2008 the team was disbanded after they failed to get out of the group stage of Olympic Qualifying, which notably featured the United States and Mexico. The program was restarted in 2014 after nearly a six-year hiatus. They finished second at the 2014 Women's Caribbean Cup losing 1–0 against Trinidad and Tobago in the final. The team is backed by ambassador Cedella Marley, the daughter of the late Bob Marley, she aids in raising awareness for the team and encourages development as well as providing for it financially. Jamaica qualified for the FIFA Women's World Cup for the first time ever in 2019.

2010s

Panama did not participate in the 2010 CONCACAF Women's World Cup Qualifying tournament as they did not enter Central American qualifying. [4]

2010 CONCACAF Womens World Cup Qualifying

The 2010 CONCACAF Women's World Cup Qualifying tournament served as the region's 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup Qualifiers. The tournament finals took place from 28 October to 8 November 2010 in Cancún, Mexico. Officially, this marked the sixth edition of the competition, which included the 2002 and 2006 editions of the CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup. Canada won the tournament, its second CONCACAF women's title.

This page provides the summaries of the matches of the qualifying rounds for the group stage of the 2010 CONCACAF Women's World Cup Qualifying tournament. These matches also served as part of the qualifiers for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup that was held in Germany.

In 2013 Panama participated in the Central American Games for the first time. They went 1–0–1 and advanced to the semi-finals, where they lost to Costa Rica. Panama would finish in fourth place after losing the third place match to Guatemala. [4]

The football tournament at the 2013 Central American Games is held in San José, Costa Rica from March 6 to March 16. Members who are affiliated to ORDECA are invite it to send their full women's national teams and men's U-21 teams to participate.

The Costa Rica women's national football team is controlled by the Costa Rican Football Federation. They are one of the top women's national football teams in the Central American region along with Guatemala.

Guatemala national football team womens national association football team representing Guatemala

The Guatemala national football team is governed by the Federación Nacional de Fútbol de Guatemala. Founded in 1919, it affiliated to FIFA in 1946, and it is a member of CONCACAF.

Panama finished second in their group in 2014 Central American Qualifying and did not qualify for the 2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship as only the group winner advanced. [5]

The 2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship Qualification was a series of women's association football tournaments that determined the participants for the 2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship. Twenty-eight national teams entered the qualification for 6 spots, but three withdrew before playing any match. The qualification was organised by CONCACAF, the Central American Football Union (UNCAF), and the Caribbean Football Union (CFU). Because the 2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship also served as the CONCACAF qualifying tournament for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, the Championship qualification also served as the first World Cup qualifying stage. Martinique and Guadeloupe were not eligible for World Cup qualification, as they were only members of CONCACAF and not FIFA.

At the 2017 Central American Games, Panama improved on their result from four ago by defeating El Salvador on penalties to finish in third place. [4]

Panama secured one of the two spots available in Central American Qualifying for the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship, this marked their first time playing in the CONCACAF Championship in 12 years. [6] Panama was drawn into Group A, alongside the United States, Mexico and Trinidad and Tobago. [7]

Panama opened the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship with a 3–0 victory over Trinidad and Tobago. They suffered a 5–0 loss to the United States in their second match. The score could have been much worse if not for the excellent performance from 17-year old goalkeeper Yenith Bailey, as she made several big saves against the US who had 18 shots on goal. [8] Panama secured their spot in the semi-final by defeating Mexico 2–0 in their final group match. Bailey once again made some big saves, including saving a penalty in the first half. Panama was beat by Canada 7–0 in the semi-final, but they would move on to the third place match where a win would secure them a spot in the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup. [9] [10] After losing the third place match to Jamaica on penalties, Panama played against Argentina at the CONCACAF-CONMEBOL play-off to secure a spot for France 2019 after Argentina secured their ticket Panama was eliminated from the qualification.

World Cup record

World Cup Finals
YearResultGPWD*LGFGAGD
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1991 Did Not Enter-------
Flag of Sweden.svg 1995 Did Not Enter-------
Flag of the United States.svg 1999 Did Not Enter-------
Flag of the United States.svg 2003 Did Not Qualify-------
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2007 Did Not Qualify-------
Flag of Germany.svg 2011 Did Not Enter-------
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 2015 Did Not Qualify-------
Flag of France.svg 2019 Did Not Qualify-------
Total0/8-------
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

CONCACAF Women's Championship & Gold Cup record

CONCACAF Women's Championship & Gold Cup
YearResultGPWD*LGFGAGD
Flag of Haiti.svg 1991 Did Not Enter-------
Flag of the United States.svg 1993 Did Not Enter-------
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 1994 Did Not Enter-------
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 1998 Did Not Enter-------
Flag of the United States.svg 2000 Did Not Enter-------
Flag of the United States.svg Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 2002 Group Stage3102516−11
Flag of the United States.svg 2006 First Round100102−2
Flag of Mexico.svg 2010 Did Not Enter-------
Flag of the United States.svg 2014 Did Not Qualify-------
Flag of the United States.svg 2018 Fourth place5212770
Total3/1093151223−13
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Players

Current squad

The following players were called-up for the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship.

No.Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClub
11 GK Yenith Bailey (2001-03-29) 29 March 2001 (age 17) Flag of Panama.svg Sporting San Miguelito
121 GK Farissa Córdoba (1989-06-30) 30 June 1989 (age 29) Flag of Panama.svg CD Universitario

22 DF Hilary Jaén (2002-08-29) 29 August 2002 (age 16) Flag of Panama.svg Atlético Nacional
32 DF María Murillo (1996-12-15) 15 December 1996 (age 22) Flag of Panama.svg Atlético Nacional
52 DF Yomira Pinzón (1996-08-23) 23 August 1996 (age 22) Flag of Panama.svg Atlético Nacional
132 DF Onelys Alvarado (1993-08-20) 20 August 1993 (age 25) Flag of Panama.svg San Francisco FC
142 DF Maryorie Pérez (1997-11-25) 25 November 1997 (age 21) Flag of Panama.svg CD Universitario
152 DF Rebeca Espinosa (1992-07-05) 5 July 1992 (age 26)Unattached
162 DF Sheyla Díaz (2005-08-09) 9 August 2005 (age 13) Flag of Panama.svg Atlético Nacional
202 DF María Montenegro (2000-09-17) 17 September 2000 (age 18) Flag of Panama.svg Atlético Nacional

43 MF Katherine Castillo (1996-03-23) 23 March 1996 (age 22) Flag of Panama.svg Atlético Nacional
63 MF Aldrith Quintero (2002-01-01) 1 January 2002 (age 17) Flag of Panama.svg Tauro FC
73 MF Kenia Rangel (1995-08-06) 6 August 1995 (age 23) Flag of Panama.svg Atlético Nacional
83 MF Laurie Batista (1996-05-29) 29 May 1996 (age 22) Flag of Panama.svg CD Universitario
103 MF Marta Cox (1997-07-20) 20 July 1997 (age 21) Flag of Panama.svg CD Universitario

94 FW Karla Riley (1997-09-18) 18 September 1997 (age 21) Flag of Panama.svg Sporting San Miguelito
114 FW Natalia Mills (1993-03-22) 22 March 1993 (age 25) Flag of Panama.svg Atlético Nacional
174 FW Anuvis Angulo (2001-05-03) 3 May 2001 (age 17) Flag of Panama.svg Atlético Nacional
184 FW Erika Hernández (1999-03-17) 17 March 1999 (age 20) Flag of Panama.svg CD Universitario
194 FW Lineth Cedeño (2000-12-05) 5 December 2000 (age 18) Flag of Panama.svg Tauro FC

Recent call ups

The following players were called-up in the last 12 months.

Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClubLatest call-up
GK Valeska Domínguez (1999-06-13) 13 June 1999 (age 19) Flag of Panama.svg Provincial de Chiriqui 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRE
GK Sasha Fábrega (1990-10-23) 23 October 1990 (age 28)Unattached 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRE

DF Amanda Aizprua (1999-02-23) 23 February 1999 (age 20) Flag of Panama.svg Provincial Veraguas 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRE
DF Yerenis De León (1995-02-23) 23 February 1995 (age 24) Flag of Panama.svg Chorrillo FC 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRE
DF Yaremys Ledezma (1998-03-05) 5 March 1998 (age 21) Flag of Panama.svg Tauro FC 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRE

MF Yasli Atencio (2002-09-25) 25 September 2002 (age 16) Flag of Panama.svg Provincial de Chiriqui 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRE
MF Emily Cedeño (2003-11-22) 22 November 2003 (age 15) Flag of Panama.svg Provincial de Chiriqui 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRE
MF María Guevara (2000-10-04) 4 October 2000 (age 18) Flag of Panama.svg Provincial Panama 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRE
MF Keisilyn Gutiérrez (1997-03-19) 19 March 1997 (age 21)Unattached 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRE
MF Lineth Pérez (2001-08-30) 30 August 2001 (age 17) Flag of Panama.svg San Francisco 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRE
MF Deysire Salazar (2004-05-04) 4 May 2004 (age 14) Flag of Panama.svg Arabe Unido 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRE
MF Andrea Stanziola (2003-04-04) 4 April 2003 (age 15) Flag of Panama.svg Sportiing FC 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRE

FW Érika Arauz (2003-07-20) 20 July 2003 (age 15) Flag of Panama.svg Provincial de Chiriqui 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRE
FW Ivonne Fernández (1999-08-06) 6 August 1999 (age 19) Flag of Panama.svg Sporting FC 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRE
FW Yassiel Franco (1998-05-31) 31 May 1998 (age 20) Flag of Panama.svg Chorrillo FC 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship PRE

Recent schedule and results

The following is a list of recent match results, as well as any future matches that have been scheduled.

2018

5 November 2018 CONCACAF–CONMEBOL play-off 1st Leg Argentina  Flag of Argentina.svgvFlag of Panama.svg  Panama
13 November 2018 CONCACAF–CONMEBOL play-off 2nd Leg Panama  Flag of Panama.svgvFlag of Argentina.svg  Argentina

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