Panic in Nakayoshi World

Last updated
Panic in Nakayoshi World
Panic in Nakayoshi World.jpg
Cover art
Developer(s) Tom Create [1]
Publisher(s) Bandai [1]
Composer(s) Harumi Fujita [2]
Yasuaki Fujita [2]
Platform(s) Super Famicom [3]
Release
  • JP: November 18, 1994 [1]
Genre(s) Action [1]
Mode(s) Single-player [4]
Multiplayer

Panic in Nakayoshi World (パニック イン なかよしワールド) [5] is a 1994 video game that was released exclusively in Japan for the Super Famicom. It features the manga series Sailor Moon , Chō Kuse ni Narisō , Goldfish Warning! and Kurumi to Shichinin no Koibitotachi .

Contents

Summary

This title is about monsters that are attacking the World of Nakayoshi. The monsters are eating up the citizens. The more they eat, the hungrier they get. Four girls must stop the monsters and defeat Daima to save the World of Nakayoshi. The game is an overhead Adventures of Lolo-style puzzle game featuring characters from various Nakayoshi-printed manga. Sailor Moon and Chibi Moon are playable characters. There are also characters from Goldfish Warning!.

Panic in Nakayoshi World has been translated to English.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 "Release information". GameFAQs . Retrieved 2011-07-18.
  2. 1 2 "Soundtrack Information". SNESmusic.org.
  3. Japanese title at super-famicom.jp (in Japanese)
  4. "# of players information". UV List.
  5. "English-Japanese title translation". SuperFamicom.org. Retrieved 2011-07-18.