Paris Saint-Germain F.C.

Last updated

Paris Saint-Germain
Paris Saint-Germain F.C..svg
Full nameParis Saint-Germain Football Club
Nickname(s)Les Parisiens (The Parisians)
Les Rouge et Bleu (The Red and Blues)
Short namePSG, Paris, Paris SG
Founded12 August 1970;51 years ago (1970-08-12)
Ground Parc des Princes
Capacity47,929
Owner Qatar Sports Investments
President Nasser Al-Khelaifi
Head coach Mauricio Pochettino
League Ligue 1
2020–21 Ligue 1, 2nd of 20
Website Club website
Soccerball current event.svg Current season
Active departments of
Paris Saint-Germain
Football pictogram.svg Football pictogram.svg Football pictogram.svg
Football (Men's) Football (Youth Mixed) Football (Women's)
Handball pictogram.svg Simple Game.svg Judo pictogram.svg
Handball (Men's) Esports Judo (Mixed)
Closed departments of
Paris Saint-Germain
Boxing pictogram.svg Rugby league pictogram.svg
Boxing (Men's) Rugby League (Men's)

Paris Saint-Germain Football Club (French pronunciation:  [paʁi sɛ̃ ʒɛʁmɛ̃] ), commonly referred to as Paris Saint-Germain, PSG, Paris or Paris SG, is a professional football club based in Paris, France. They compete in Ligue 1, the top division of French football. France's most successful club, they have won over 40 official honours, including nine league titles and one major European trophy. Their home ground is the Parc des Princes.

Contents

Founded in 1970, the Parisians won their first major honour, the French Cup, in 1982 and their first Ligue 1 title in 1986. The 1990s was among the most successful periods in PSG's history; they claimed a second league, three French Cups, two French League Cups, two French Super Cups and the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup in 1996. After suffering a decline in fortunes during the 2000s, the Red and Blues have enjoyed a revival since 2011 with increased financial backing, achieving unparalleled dominance in domestic competitions, winning seven league titles and twenty national cups. PSG have also become a regular feature in the UEFA Champions League, reaching their first final in 2020.

PSG are the club with most consecutive seasons playing in the top-flight and one of only two French clubs to have won a major European title. They are also the most popular football club in France and one of the most widely supported teams in the world. PSG's home kit colours are red, blue and white, and the club's crest features the Eiffel Tower and a fleur de lys. PSG have a long-standing rivalry with Olympique de Marseille. The duo contest French football's most notorious match, known as Le Classique .

Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, the Emir of Qatar, owns PSG through closed shareholders Qatar Sports Investments (QSI), which purchased the club in 2011. The takeover made PSG the richest club in France and one of the wealthiest in the world. As of the 2019–20 season, PSG have the seventh-highest revenue in the footballing world with an annual revenue of €541m according to Deloitte, and are the world's ninth-most valuable football club, worth $2.5bn according to Forbes.

History

Creation and split (1970–1974)

Guy Crescent, one of the club's founders. GC30.jpg
Guy Crescent, one of the club's founders.

In the summer of 1970, an ambitious group of businessmen decided to create a major team in the French capital. [1] [2] Guy Crescent and Pierre-Étienne Guyot chose to merge their newly formed side, Paris Football Club, with Stade Saint-Germain of Henri Patrelle after the team from Saint-Germain-en-Laye, 15km west of Paris, were promoted to Ligue 2. [2] [3] Real Madrid played a big role in the foundation of Paris Saint-Germain. [4] The three men were stuck with the financial feasibility of the project until they met Real's president Santiago Bernabéu. [4] [5]

Bernabéu told them that starting a crowdfunding campaign was the best solution to establish a new team. [4] After a petition was signed by 20,000 people, Paris Saint-Germain Football Club were officially formed on 12 August 1970. [1] [6] For the first time in French football history, the fans had financially contributed in the making of a football club. [4] Led by Jean Djorkaeff, the club's first star, PSG won promotion to Division 1 and claimed the 1970–71 French Division 2 title in its first season. [2] [7] Their momentum was soon checked, however, and the club split in 1972. [2] Paris FC remained in the top tier, while PSG were administratively relegated to Division 3. [2] [8]

First major honours and decline (1974–1991)

Following back-to-back promotions, Paris Saint-Germain quickly returned to the premier division in 1974, ironically at the same time as Paris FC slipped into the division below, and moved into the Parc des Princes, which up until that point had been the home stadium of PFC. [2] [9] Since then, PSG have never abandoned the top flight of French football nor the Parc. [10] Chaired by Daniel Hechter, the Red and Blues failed to win any silverware in the 1970s but began their tradition of brilliant Coupe de France runs, established themselves as a top-half team in Division 1 and attracted several prestigious players, including Jean-Pierre Dogliani, Mustapha Dahleb and Carlos Bianchi. [2] [11]

The club's trophy cabinet welcomed its first major silverware after Francis Borelli became club president. [1] [12] Star signings Joël Bats, Dominique Bathenay, Safet Sušić and Dominique Rocheteau, alongside PSG Academy graduate Luis Fernandez, steered the capital side to two consecutive French Cup titles in 1982 and 1983 and then its maiden league championship in 1986. [1] [2] These successes opened Paris the doors to Europe, [7] including their impressive continental debut in the 1982–83 European Cup Winners' Cup, [13] but the follow-up to the league title wasn't as glorious. [14] PSG avoided relegation on the final match of the 1987–88 season after a 4–1 win over Lens at the Parc des Princes. [11] [14] Highly indebted, the club briefly bounced back, fighting for the 1988–89 league crown with Marseille, before going into decline. [14] [15]

George Weah won the Ballon d'Or for his performances with Paris Saint-Germain. Coppa UEFA 1992-93 - Napoli vs PSG - George Weah.jpg
George Weah won the Ballon d'Or for his performances with Paris Saint-Germain.

Canal+ takeover and golden era (1991–1998)

The takeover by television giants Canal+ in 1991 revitalised Paris Saint-Germain as they became one of the richest clubs in France. [1] [5] Canal+ wiped out PSG's huge debt and appointed Michel Denisot, journalist on the channel, as club president in place of Francis Borelli. [5] [16] Now enjoying serious investment, Paris were able to set their sights steadily higher and embarked on a spending spree, signing the best talent in France and abroad. French internationals Bernard Lama, Alain Roche, Paul Le Guen, Vincent Guérin, David Ginola, Daniel Bravo, Bruno Ngotty and Youri Djorkaeff were paired with foreign stars Ricardo, Valdo, Raí, Leonardo and Marco Simone. [2] [16] But perhaps the greatest talent of all was prolific Liberian striker George Weah, who became the first (and so far only) PSG player to win the Ballon d'Or and the FIFA World Player of the Year awards in 1995. [17]

Considered the club's golden era, the Parisians won nine trophies and reached five consecutive European semi-finals during the 1990s, including their first UEFA Champions League last-four appearance and two at the same stage of the UEFA Cup. [2] [7] [16] PSG's crowning glory came in the 1996 UEFA Cup Winners' Cup Final with legend Luis Fernandez now as coach. [18] Bruno Ngotty hit the only goal of the match to defeat Rapid Wien and make Paris the second French club to ever clinch a major European tournament. [19] [20] The following season, PSG finished runners-up in the 1996 UEFA Super Cup and 1997 UEFA Cup Winners' Cup Final. [21] [22] On the domestic scene, results were just as satisfying, with Paris celebrating a second league title, three French Cups, two French League Cups and just as many French Super Cup wins. [2] [7] [16]

Crisis mode and relegation battles (1998–2011)

At the start of the 21st century, PSG struggled to rescale the heights despite the magic of Ronaldinho and the goals of Pauleta. [1] Five more trophies arrived in the form of three French Cups (including one against Le Classique arch-rivals Marseille in 2006), one French League Cup and one UEFA Intertoto Cup, but the club became better known for lurching from one high-profile crisis to another. [7] [23] [24] Following years of mismanagement, the club's form dwindled as they slipped further down the table and a split from Canal+ became inevitable. [2] [7]

Neymar during his presentation in 2017. Neymar Jr presentation - Press conference for PSG 001.jpg
Neymar during his presentation in 2017.

The French premium television channel sold the club to Colony Capital in 2006. The situation, however, only got worse and PSG spent the 2006–07 and 2007–08 campaigns staving off relegations. [2] [7] The latter was the most dramatic. Marred by poor results and fan violence, Paris avoided the drop on the final match after a 2–1 win at Sochaux. The hero was Ivorian striker Amara Diané who scored both goals that night. Despite not enjoying the star status of other current or past PSG greats, Diané is still considered a legend by most Parisian fans. [4]

QSI ownership and domestic hegemony (2011–present)

The fortunes of Paris Saint-Germain changed dramatically when Qatar Sports Investments (QSI) purchased the club in 2011. [7] The takeover made PSG not only the richest club in France but one of the wealthiest in the world. [25] Club president Nasser Al-Khelaifi pledged to form a team capable of winning the UEFA Champions League and making the club France's biggest name. [7] [26] Since then, Paris have spent heavily on the signings of world-class players such as Zlatan Ibrahimović, David Beckham, Neymar, Kylian Mbappé and Lionel Messi. [27] [28] [29]

As a result, the Parisians have dominated French football, winning 27 trophies: seven league titles, six French Cups, six French League Cups and eight French Super Cups. [23] [30] They have also become a regular in the knockout stages of the Champions League. [31] After several disappointing nights, [31] including arguably the club's most painful continental defeat in the infamous and controversial "La Remontada" ("The Comeback") against Barcelona, [32] they reached the final for the first time in 2020, losing 1–0 to Bayern Munich. [33] PSG's good form continued in 2021 with a second consecutive UCL semi-final appearance, a first for the club. [34]

Identity

Colours and mascot

Germain the Lynx, PSG's mascot. 20130120 - PSG-Toulouse - 015.jpg
Germain the Lynx, PSG's mascot.

Since their foundation, Paris Saint-Germain have represented both the city of Paris and the nearby royal town of Saint-Germain-en-Laye. [7] As a result, red, blue and white are the club's traditional colours. [35] The red and blue are Parisian colours, a nod to revolutionary figures Lafayette and Jean Sylvain Bailly, and the white is a symbol of French royalty and Saint-Germain-en-Laye. [35] [36]

On the club's crest, the Eiffel Tower in red and the blue background represent Paris, while the fleur de lys in white is a hint to the coat of arms of Saint-Germain-en-Laye. [36] [35] The fleur de lys is a royal symbol as well and recalls that French King Louis XIV was born in the town. [35] Throughout its history, PSG have brandished several crests, but all of them have featured the club's three historical colours. [37]

Likewise, PSG's most iconic shirts have been predominantly red, blue or white, with the remaining two colours included as well. [38] The club's official mascot, Germain the Lynx, also sports PSG's traditional colours. [36] It was unveiled during the 2010 Tournoi de Paris in commemoration of the club's 40th anniversary, and can be seen entertaining kids in the stands of the Parc des Princes or near the pitch with the players during the warm-up. [39]

Anthems and mottos

"Allez Paris!," recorded by Belgian actress and singer Annie Cordy in 1971, was the club's first official anthem. A PSG fan from the start, she was part of an association of hundreds of celebrities who contributed to the club's foundation in 1970. [40] [41] The club's second anthem, "Allez Paris-Saint-Germain!" by Les Parisiens, was recorded in 1977, replacing Cordy's version. An initiative of historical PSG leader and music producer Charles Talar, he produced and released it under his homonym record label. [42] [43] [44] The song's chorus became a popular chant among PSG supporters during games. [45] A new version, also called "Allez Paris-Saint-Germain!," was recorded in 2010 as part of the club's 40th anniversary celebrations. Sung to the tune of "Go West" by Village People, the lyrics were rewritten with suggestions made by fans. This is the club's current official anthem. [36] [39] [43]

"Ô Ville Lumière" ("Oh City of Light"), to the tune of "Flower of Scotland," is another veritable club anthem for PSG supporters. [46] [47] Other notable chants from supporters' groups in the Boulogne and Auteuil stands include "Le Parc est à nous" ("The Parc is ours"), "Paris est magique!" ("Paris is magical!") and "Ici, c'est Paris!" ("This is Paris!"). [36] [48] Both stands began exchanging these chants during PSG matches in the 1990s. [45] [49] [50] "Paris est magique!" and "Ici c'est Paris!" are also the club's most iconic mottos or slogans. [36] [51] [52] "Who Said I Would" by Phill Collins is also a traditional anthem for the fans. The song has accompanied the players' entry into the field since 1992. [53]

Iconic shirts

During their first three seasons of existence, the home shirt of Paris Saint-Germain was red with blue and white details in its sleeves and neck to bring together the three colours of the club: the red and blue of Paris, and the white of Saint-Germain-en-Laye. [38] [54] [55] During the 2010–11 season, PSG wore a red shirt during home matches to commemorate their 40th anniversary. [56]

The connection between Paris Saint-Germain and the city's fashion houses is a longstanding one. French fashion designer Daniel Hechter became PSG president in 1973 and designed the club's traditional home look that same year: a blue shirt with a red vertical stripe flanked by two thinner white stripes (blue-white-red-white-blue). [54] [57] First worn in the 1973–74 season, the so-called "Hechter shirt" has remained the classic home identity of PSG ever since. [38] [58] [59] [60]

The three most iconic shirts of Paris Saint-Germain. PSG iconic shirts.png
The three most iconic shirts of Paris Saint-Germain.

The famous jersey made its debut during a home Ligue 2 game against Red Star on November 10, 1973. [61] This was also the club's maiden match at the Parc des Princes. PSG won 3–1 as Othniel Dossevi scored the club's first goal at the stadium as well as the first with the Hechter shirt. [62] PSG stars from the 1990s and 2000s like Raí, Ronaldinho and Pauleta are associated with this kit. While wearing it, the capital club reached five European semi-finals in a row between 1993 and 1997, claimed the 1995–96 UEFA Cup Winners' Cup and achieved eight consecutive wins against Le Classique arch-rivals Olympique de Marseille between 2002 and 2004. [38] [63]

The general belief is that Hechter based his creation on the red-and-white jersey worn by Ajax, the dominant team in Europe at the time, but with the French flag in mind. [54] [57] [64] Hechter himself has denied this, though, instead claiming he was inspired by the Ford Mustang. He transposed the car's hood stripes on the shirt and employed the three colours of the club. [54] The Hechter shirt has two alternate versions: the "reversed Hechter" (red-white-blue-white-red), introduced in the 1974–75 season, and the "white Hechter" (white-blue-red-blue-white), which premiered in the 1994–95 season. [54] [60] [65]

It was with the club's most iconic away outfit, though, that fans saw the first big PSG team which won their maiden Coupe de France titles in 1982 and 1983, experienced their first European campaign in 1983 and claimed their maiden league crown in 1986. The shirt was white with blue and red vertical stripes on the left. [38] [58] Like the Hechter jersey, it debuted in the 1973–74 season as the away kit. [54] Promoted by PSG president Francis Borelli, the white shirt was the club's home identity from 1981 to 1990. [58] Now known as the "Borelli shirt," it is synonym with PSG legends from the 1980s like Safet Sušić, Luis Fernández and Dominique Bathenay. [38] [59] [66]

Crest evolution

PSG logo between 1992 and 1996. Logo Paris SG 1992.svg
PSG logo between 1992 and 1996.

The first crest of Paris Saint-Germain was basically the same as the original Paris FC (PFC) logo. Having to merge and give birth to the club using Stade Saint-Germain's stadium, the PFC crest kept its original design but the name below it changed from "Paris FC" to "Paris Saint-Germain Football Club." This badge consisted of a blue football with a red vessel inside it. The latter is a historic symbol of Paris and is present in the city's coat of arms. The name of the club was written below in red. PSG, however, split from PFC in 1972 and thus needed a new crest. [67]

Representing both Paris and Saint-Germain-en-Laye, the club's second crest became the basis of the one the fans know today. The round logo featured the Eiffel Tower in red against a blue background with two Saint-Germain symbols in white between its legs: a fleur de lys and Louis XIV's cradle. [67] This crest was created by Christian Lentretien, former PSG board member and publicist by profession, in 1972. [68] It was first used until 1982. [67]

The Parc des Princes, the club's home stadium, was added below the crest in 1982 and lasted until 1990. Following a brief return of the traditional crest between 1990 and 1992, former owners Canal+ radically changed it in 1992. The new model had the acronym "PSG" in white against a blue-white-red-white-blue background (like the colour pattern of the Hechter shirt) with "Paris Saint-Germain" underneath in white against a black background. [67]

Under pressure from supporters, the traditional crest returned in 1995 with "Paris Saint-Germain" above the tower and "1970" below the cradle. This logo went through a slight facelift in 2002. At the request of the club's Qatari owners, the traditional crest underwent a major makeover in 2013. [67] “Paris” is now written in big white bold letters above a large Eiffel Tower, clearly putting forward the brand “Paris” instead of “Paris Saint-Germain.” Underneath it, “Saint-Germain” is written in smaller letters below the fleur de lys. [51] [69] In contrast, the cradle and the club's founding year "1970" were left out. [69] PSG deputy general manager Jean-Claude Blanc said: “We are called Paris Saint-Germain but, above all, we are called Paris.” [51]

Friendly tournaments

Paris Saint-Germain used to host two very famous invitational competitions: the Tournoi de Paris and the Tournoi Indoor de Paris-Bercy. [70] [71] Regarded as French football's most prestigious friendly tournament, the Tournoi de Paris is considered a precursor of both the Intercontinental Cup and the FIFA Club World Cup. [70] [72] PSG began hosting it in 1975 and were crowned champions a record seven times. [70] Held at the Parc des Princes, the Tournoi de Paris was last organized in 2012. [70] [73] The Tournoi Indoor de Paris-Bercy was an indoor football tournament founded by PSG in 1984 and held annually until 1991 at the AccorHotels Arena in the 12th arrondissement of Paris. Played indoors on a synthetic field and featuring seven-a-side teams, the competition featured hosts PSG and five more clubs. The Parisians lifted the trophy on two occasions, more than any other club. [71]

Grounds

Stadiums

Inside the Parc des Princes in April 2019. PSG-Nantes Parc des Princes 05.jpg
Inside the Parc des Princes in April 2019.

Paris Saint-Germain played their first game at their current home stadium, the 47,929-seater Parc des Princes, against Ligue 2 promotion rivals Red Star on November 10, 1973. [62] [74] It was the curtain-raiser for that season's opening Ligue 1 match between Paris FC (PFC) and Sochaux. [62] PSG moved into the ground upon its return to Ligue 1 in 1974, ironically the same year that PFC were relegated. Up until that point it had been the home venue of PFC. [2] [9]

During their early years, PSG played at several grounds including the main stadium of the Stade Municipal Georges Lefèvre sports complex, the Stade Jean-Bouin, the Stade de Paris and even the Parc des Princes a few times despite the reluctance of PFC. [75] [76] Ever since PSG moved to the Parc, the Stade Georges Lefèvre's artificial turf and grass football pitches have hosted training sessions and home matches for the club's academy sides. [76] [77] The complex is located in Saint-Germain-en-Laye, just across the street from the Camp des Loges, the club's training center. [77]

Training facilities

Located in Saint-Germain-en-Laye, the Camp des Loges has been the club's training ground since 1970. [78] The current Camp des Loges, built on the same site as the old one, was inaugurated in November 2008. [79] It was then renamed Ooredoo Training Centre in September 2013 as part of a sponsorship deal with Ooredoo. [80]

The Paris Saint-Germain Training Center will be the club's new training ground and sports complex. [81] [82] [83] It will replace the Camp des Loges upon its completion in June 2023. [84] [85] Owned and financed by the club, the venue will bring together PSG's male football, handball and judo teams, as well as the football and handball academies. [81] [84] The club, however, will remain closely linked to their historic birthplace in Saint-Germain-en-Laye as the Camp des Loges will become the training ground of the female football team and academy. [86] [87]

Support

PSG supporters before the 2006 French Cup Final against arch-rivals Marseille. OM-PSG CF finale-1.jpg
PSG supporters before the 2006 French Cup Final against arch-rivals Marseille.

Paris Saint-Germain is the most popular football club in France and one of the most widely supported teams in the world. [88] [89] Famous PSG fans include Nicolas Sarkozy, Tony Parker, Tom Brady, Patrick Dempsey, Victoria Azarenka, Teddy Riner and DJ Snake. [90]

Lacking a big passionate fanbase, the club began offering cheaper season tickets to young supporters in 1976. [48] [91] [92] These fans were placed in the Kop K, located in the K section of the Borelli stand at the Parc des Princes. [92] [93] Following an increase in ticket prices, Kop K supporters moved to the Boulogne stand in 1978, and the Kop of Boulogne (KoB) was born. [92] [94] There, the club's first Italian-style ultra group, Boulogne Boys, was founded in 1985. [94] Other KoB groups, however, took British hooligans as dubious role models and violence rapidly escalated. [91] PSG supporters' groups have been linked to football hooliganism ever since. [94]

PSG owners Canal+ responded in 1991 by encouraging and financing non-violent fans of the KoB stand to take place in the Auteuil stand at the other end of the Parc des Princes. The Virage Auteuil was born, alongside Supras Auteuil, its most notorious ultras. [95] At first the measure worked but, slowly, a violent rivalry arose between the two stands. [95] [96] Things came to a head in 2010 before a match against Olympique de Marseille in Paris. Boulogne fan Yann Lorence was killed following a fight between groups from both stands outside the Parc des Princes, forcing PSG president Robin Leproux to take action. [97] [98]

The club exiled the supporters' groups from the Parc des Princes and banned them from all PSG matches in what was known as Plan Leproux. [97] [98] It made PSG pay the price in terms of atmosphere, with one of Europe's most feared venues now subdued. [96] [98] For their part, former Virage Auteuil supporters formed the Collectif Ultras Paris (CUP) in February 2016, with the aim of reclaiming their place at the stadium. [99] In October 2016, after a six-year absence, the club agreed to their return. [98] Grouped in the Auteuil end of the stadium, the CUP currently is the only ultra association officially recognized by PSG. [98] [100] The ultra movement has also started to come back to life in the Boulogne stand. New groups Block Parisii, Paname Rebirth and Résistance Parisienne are trying to convince the club of relaunching the Kop of Boulogne. [101]

Rivalries

Paris Saint-Germain shares an intense rivalry with Olympique de Marseille; matches between the two teams are referred to as Le Classique. [102] Equivalent to Spain's El Clásico, [103] the fixture is the biggest rivalry in France and one of the greatest in the world. [104] [105] The level of animosity is such that it extends outside of the pitch. Both sets of fans have been clashing against each other almost since the very first encounters between the two sides. [106] [107]

The duo are the two most successful clubs in French football history and the only two French teams to have won major European trophies. Moreover, PSG and OM were the dominant forces in the land prior to the emergence of Olympique Lyonnais in the 2000s. [102] They are also the two most popular clubs in France and the two most followed French teams outside the country, ahead of Lyon. [88] [89] [106] Both clubs are at or near the top of the attendance lists every season as well. [106]

In their early meetings during the 1970s there was little indication the two would become deadly adversaries. The newly formed Parisians were trying to assemble a competitive team, while the Olympians were Ligue 1 contenders. It all changed in 1986, when PSG won its first championship and OM were bought by Bernard Tapie. [108] By the end of the decade, PSG were fighting for the 1988–89 title against Tapie's star-studded Marseille, and sparks flew for the first time. [106] [109] The accusations made by PSG president Francis Borelli against Tapie and OM for fixing matches during that season were a big contributor to their growing antagonism. [24]

The 1990s were the real starting point of the rivalry, though. French TV channel Canal+ bought PSG in 1991 with the aim of breaking Marseille's hegemony, but agreed with Tapie to fuel the animosity between them as a way to spice up the league. [106] [109] Now with similar financial power, PSG and OM established themselves as top contenders in the title race. [110] Both sides were less successful in the late 1990s and throughout the 2000s, but the rivalry remained just as fierce. [108] [110] However, since the 2010s, the matchup has been completely dominated by PSG. The investment of their mega-rich Qatar owners has created a wide gap between them and Marseille. [110]

Ownership and finances

Swedish striker Zlatan Ibrahimovic (center) became the club's first high-profile signing in 2012. Zlatan Ibrahimovic unveiling.jpg
Swedish striker Zlatan Ibrahimović (center) became the club's first high-profile signing in 2012.

During its first three years of existence, Paris Saint-Germain was fan-owned and had 20,000 socios. [1] [91] The club was run by board members Guy Crescent, Pierre-Étienne Guyot and Henri Patrelle. [4] [91] A group of wealthy French businessmen, led by Daniel Hechter and Francis Borelli, would then buy the club in 1973. [3] PSG changed hands in 1991, when Canal+ took over, and then again in 2006 with the arrival of Colony Capital. [5] Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, the Emir of Qatar, has been PSG's owner since 2011 through state-run shareholding organization Qatar Sports Investments (QSI). [111]

A subsidiary of Qatar's sovereign wealth fund Qatar Investment Authority (QIA), QSI became the club's majority shareholders in June 2011 and sole shareholders in March 2012. [5] [111] [112] This means PSG are a state-owned club, the only of its kind, and thus one of the richest teams in the world. [25] [113] [114] QSI chairman Nasser Al-Khelaifi has been PSG president since the takeover. [115] Al Thani, however, has the final word on every major decision of the club. [116] He is both the chairman of the QIA and the founder of QSI. [117]

Upon its arrival, QSI pledged to form a team capable of winning the UEFA Champions League and making the club France's biggest name. [7] PSG have spent over €1.3bn on player transfers since the summer of 2011. [28] These massive expenditures have translated in PSG's domination of French football but have not yet brought home the coveted Champions League trophy as well as causing problems with UEFA's Financial Fair Play regulations. [27] [115] [118]

As of the 2019–20 season, PSG have the seventh-highest revenue in the footballing world with an annual turnover of €541m according to Deloitte, and are the world's ninth most valuable football club, worth $2.5bn according to Forbes magazine. [119] [120] PSG's strong financial position has been sustained by the club's Qatari owners; [121] the team's on-pitch success; [27] high-profile signings like Zlatan Ibrahimović, David Beckham, Neymar, Kylian Mbappé and Lionel Messi; [28] [29] and lucrative sponsorship deals with the Qatar Tourism Authority, Nike, Accor and Air Jordan. [121] [122] Throughout their history, though, PSG have rarely been profitable. [123] Prior to the Qatar buyout, the club's cumulative losses amounted to €300m. [123] [124]

Honours

As of the end of the 2020–21 Ligue 1 season. [23]

Paris Saint-Germain holds many records, [125] most notably being the most successful French club in history in terms of official titles won, with 45. [1] [23] Domestically, PSG have clinched nine Ligue 1 championships, a record fourteen Coupe de France, a record nine Coupe de la Ligue, a record ten Trophée des Champions and one Ligue 2 title. In international club football, they have claimed one UEFA Cup Winners' Cup and one UEFA Intertoto Cup. [23] Additionally, PSG have won 25 unofficial titles. [126] [127] [128] [129]

Their victory in the 1995–96 UEFA Cup Winners' Cup makes PSG the sole French side to have won this trophy as well as one of only two French clubs to have won a major European competition and the youngest European team to do so. [20] [130] The Parisians are also the club with the most consecutive seasons in the top-flight (47 seasons in Ligue 1 since 1974–75). [131] Furthermore, PSG are the only side to have won the Coupe de France without conceding a single goal (1992–93 and 2016–17), [132] five Coupe de la Ligue in a row (2014–2018), [133] four back-to-back Coupe de France (2015–2018), [134] and eight consecutive Trophée des Champions (2013–2020). [135]

PSG have won all four national titles in a single season on four occasions. This feat is known as the domestic quadruple. The Red and Blues have completed the domestic double, the league and league cup double, the domestic cup double and the domestic treble several times as well. Therefore, PSG are the club with the most domestic doubles and league and league cup doubles, and the only team to have won the domestic cup double, the domestic treble and the domestic quadruple. [23] [136] [137]

Domestic

European

Doubles and trebles

Players

As of 3 September 2021. [138]

First-team squad

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No.Pos.NationPlayer
1 GK Flag of Costa Rica.svg  CRC Keylor Navas
2 DF Flag of Morocco.svg  MAR Achraf Hakimi
3 DF Flag of France.svg  FRA Presnel Kimpembe (vice-captain) [139]
4 DF Flag of Spain.svg  ESP Sergio Ramos
5 DF Flag of Brazil.svg  BRA Marquinhos (captain) [139]
6 MF Flag of Italy.svg  ITA Marco Verratti
7 FW Flag of France.svg  FRA Kylian Mbappé
8 MF Flag of Argentina.svg  ARG Leandro Paredes
9 FW Flag of Argentina.svg  ARG Mauro Icardi
10 FW Flag of Brazil.svg  BRA Neymar
11 MF Flag of Argentina.svg  ARG Ángel Di María
12 MF Flag of Brazil.svg  BRA Rafinha
14 DF Flag of Spain.svg  ESP Juan Bernat
15 MF Flag of Portugal.svg  POR Danilo Pereira
16 GK Flag of Spain.svg  ESP Sergio Rico
17 DF Flag of France.svg  FRA Colin Dagba
18 MF Flag of the Netherlands.svg  NED Georginio Wijnaldum
20 DF Flag of France.svg  FRA Layvin Kurzawa
No.Pos.NationPlayer
21 MF Flag of Spain.svg  ESP Ander Herrera
22 DF Flag of Senegal.svg  SEN Abdou Diallo
23 MF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Julian Draxler
24 DF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Thilo Kehrer
25 DF Flag of Portugal.svg  POR Nuno Mendes (on loan from Sporting CP)
27 MF Flag of Senegal.svg  SEN Idrissa Gueye
28 MF Flag of France.svg  FRA Éric Junior Dina Ebimbe
30 FW Flag of Argentina.svg  ARG Lionel Messi
31 DF Flag of France.svg  FRA El Chadaille Bitshiabu
32 DF Flag of France.svg  FRA Teddy Alloh
34 MF Flag of the Netherlands.svg  NED Xavi Simons
35 MF Flag of France.svg  FRA Ismaël Gharbi
38 MF Flag of France.svg  FRA Edouard Michut
39 MF Flag of France.svg  FRA Nathan Bitumazala
40 GK Flag of Italy.svg  ITA Denis Franchi
50 GK Flag of Italy.svg  ITA Gianluigi Donnarumma
60 GK Flag of France.svg  FRA Alexandre Letellier

Out on loan

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No.Pos.NationPlayer
GK Flag of France.svg  FRA Alphonse Areola (to West Ham United until 30 June 2022)
GK Flag of Poland.svg  POL Marcin Bułka (to Nice until 30 June 2022)
GK Flag of France.svg  FRA Garissone Innocent (to Vannes until 30 June 2022)
DF Flag of France.svg  FRA Thierno Baldé (to Le Havre until 30 June 2022)
No.Pos.NationPlayer
DF Flag of France.svg  FRA Timothée Pembélé (to Bordeaux until 30 June 2022)
MF Flag of Spain.svg  ESP Pablo Sarabia (to Sporting CP until 30 June 2022)
FW Flag of France.svg  FRA Kenny Nagera (to SC Bastia until 30 June 2022)
FW Flag of France.svg  FRA Arnaud Kalimuendo (to Lens until 30 June 2022)

Youth players under contract

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No.Pos.NationPlayer
DF Flag of France.svg  FRA Jonathan Mutombo
MF Flag of France.svg  FRA Bandiougou Fadiga
MF Flag of France.svg  FRA Anfane Ahamada
No.Pos.NationPlayer
MF Flag of Algeria.svg  ALG Massinissa Oufella
FW Flag of France.svg  FRA Alexandre Fressange

Staff and management

As of 12 July 2021. [138] [140] [141]

Corporate hierarchy

Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani 2015.jpg
Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani
Nasser Al-Khelaifi Nasser Al-Khelaifi.jpg
Nasser Al-Khelaïfi
Leonardo Leonardo Nascimento de Araujo 2011.jpg
Leonardo
Mauricio Pochettino Mauricio Pochettino 2016 (cropped).jpg
Mauricio Pochettino
PositionName
Owner Flag of Qatar.svg Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani
Majority shareholder Flag of Qatar.svg Qatar Sports Investments
President Flag of Qatar.svg Nasser Al-Khelaifi
Sporting director Flag of Brazil.svg Leonardo
Assistant sporting director Flag of Italy.svg Angelo Castellazzi
Secretary general Flag of France.svg Victoriano Melero
Deputy general manager Flag of France.svg Jean-Claude Blanc
Director of communications Flag of France.svg Jean-Martial Ribes

Technical staff

PositionName
Head coach Flag of Argentina.svg Mauricio Pochettino
Assistant coaches Flag of Spain.svg Jesús Pérez
Flag of Argentina.svg Miguel D'Agostino
Goalkeeper coaches Flag of Spain.svg Toni Jiménez
Flag of Italy.svg Gianluca Spinelli
Fitness coaches Flag of Argentina.svg Sebastiano Pochettino
Flag of France.svg Nicolas Mayer
Video analysis managers Flag of France.svg Antoine Guillotin
Flag of France.svg Vincent Brunet
Flag of France.svg Clément Gonin

Performance staff

PositionName
Club performance coordinator Flag of Italy.svg Gian Nicola Bisciotti
Sports scientists Flag of France.svg Denis Lefebve
Flag of Brazil.svg Ricardo Rosa
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Ben Michael Simpson
Flag of France.svg Maxime Coulerot
Flag of Italy.svg Cristoforo Filetti

Medical staff

PositionName
Chief medical doctor Flag of France.svg Christophe Baudot
Doctor Flag of France.svg Quentin Vincent
Physiotherapist coordinator Flag of France.svg Cyril Praud
Physiotherapists Flag of France.svg Frédéric Mankowski
Flag of France.svg Joffrey Martin
Flag of France.svg Gaël Pasquer
Flag of Brazil.svg Rafael Martini
Flag of Italy.svg Dario Forte
Flag of Italy.svg Diego Mantovani
Podologist Flag of France.svg Gaëlle Scalia
Medical assistant Flag of France.svg Sandrine Jarzaguet

Related Research Articles

Coupe de la Ligue Football tournament

The Coupe de la Ligue, known outside France as the French League Cup, was a knockout cup competition in French football organized by the Ligue de Football Professionnel. The tournament was established in 1993 and, unlike the Coupe de France, was only open to professional clubs in France which play in country's top three football divisions, though the third is not fully professional.

Parc des Princes Football stadium in Paris, France

The Parc des Princes is an all-seater football stadium in Paris, France, in the south-west of the French capital, inside the 16th arrondissement, near the Stade Jean-Bouin and Stade Roland Garros.

Paris Saint-Germain F.C. in international football Overview of the status and role of Paris Saint-Germain F.C. in international football

Paris Saint-Germain Football Club, an association football team based in Paris, is the joint-most decorated French team in international club competitions. The Red and Blues have won two international titles: the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup in 1996 and the UEFA Intertoto Cup in 2001. In addition, they were runners-up in the 1996 UEFA Super Cup, the 1996–97 UEFA Cup Winners' Cup and the 2019–20 UEFA Champions League. Their Cup Winners' Cup victory makes PSG the sole French side to have won this trophy as well as one of only two French clubs to have won a major European competition and the youngest European team to do so.

Paris Saint-Germain Féminine Womens department of Paris Saint-Germain

Paris Saint-Germain Féminine, commonly referred to as Paris Saint-Germain, Paris SG, or simply Paris or PSG, are a French professional football club based in Paris. Founded in 1971, they compete in Division 1 Féminine, the top division of French football. Their home ground is the Stade Jean-Bouin. They are the women's department of Paris Saint-Germain.

Le Classique

Le Classique is the name given in football to the rivalry between French professional clubs Paris Saint-Germain and Olympique de Marseille. Equivalent to Spain's El Clásico, the fixture is the biggest rivalry in France and one of the greatest in the world. The level of animosity is such that it extends outside of the pitch. Both sets of fans have been clashing against each other almost since the very first encounters between the two sides.

History of Paris Saint-Germain F.C. History of Paris Saint-Germain Football Club

Paris Saint-Germain Football Club was founded in August 1970 after the merger of Paris Football Club and Stade Saint-Germain. PSG made an immediate impact, winning promotion to Division 1 and claiming the Division 2 title in their first season. Their momentum was soon checked, however, and the club split in 1972. Paris FC remained in the top flight, while PSG were administratively relegated to Division 3. Following back-to-back promotions, PSG quickly returned to the premier division in 1974 and moved into the Parc des Princes.

The 2007–08 season was French football club Paris Saint-Germain's 35th professional season, their 35th season in Ligue 1 and their 34th consecutive season in French top-flight. It was their 38th season in existence. PSG was managed by Paul Le Guen - in his first full season since replacing Guy Lacombe. The club was chaired by Alain Cayzac until Simon Tahar took over. Paris Saint-Germain was present in the 2007–08 Ligue 1, the 2007–08 Coupe de France and the 2007–08 Coupe de la Ligue. Last season's poor results prevented the capital club to participate in consecutive years in a European competition. Paris Saint-Germain's average home gate for the 2007–08 season was 36,947, the third highest in the Ligue 1.

Paris Saint-Germain Academy Youth academy of French club Paris Saint-Germain F. C.

The Paris Saint-Germain Academy, commonly known as the PSG Academy, is the youth system of both Paris Saint-Germain and Paris Saint-Germain Féminine. Established in 1970, the academy is managed by the Association Paris Saint-Germain. Its first youth training centre opened in 1975 at the Camp des Loges in Saint-Germain-en-Laye, Île-de-France. The academy now has centres in several countries around the world. The club launched the women's section of the academy in 2012 at the Centre Sports et Loisirs de la Banque de France de Bougival in Bougival, Île-de-France.

Paris Saint-Germain F.C. ownership and finances

During its first three years of existence, Paris Saint-Germain Football Club was fan-owned and had 20,000 socios. The club was run by board members Guy Crescent, Pierre-Étienne Guyot and Henri Patrelle. A group of wealthy French businessmen, led by Daniel Hechter and Francis Borelli, would then buy the club in 1973. PSG changed hands in 1991, when Canal+ took over, and then again in 2006, with the arrival of Colony Capital. Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, the Emir of Qatar, has been PSG's owner since 2011 through state-run shareholding organization Qatar Sports Investments (QSI).

Paris Saint-Germain F.C. supporters Supporters of Paris Saint-Germain F.C.

Paris Saint-Germain Football Club (PSG) is the most popular football club in France and one of the most widely supported teams in the world. Famous PSG fans include Nicolas Sarkozy, Tony Parker, Tom Brady, Patrick Dempsey, Victoria Azarenka, Teddy Riner, and DJ Snake.

The 1973–74 season was Paris Saint-Germain's 4th season in existence. PSG mainly played their home league games at the Stade Municipal Georges Lefèvre in Saint-Germain-en-Laye, but occasionally at the Parc des Princes and the Stade Jean-Bouin as well, registering an average attendance of 4,087 spectators per match. The club was presided by Daniel Hechter and the team was coached by co-managers Just Fontaine and Robert Vicot. Jean-Pierre Dogliani was the team captain.

The 1974–75 season was Paris Saint-Germain's 5th season in existence. PSG mainly played their home league games at the Parc des Princes in Paris, but once at the Stade Olympique Yves-du-Manoir in Colombes as well, registering an average attendance of 17,456 spectators per match. The Parisians also played one Coupe de France home game at the Stade de Paris in Saint-Ouen-sur-Seine. The club was presided by Daniel Hechter and the team was coached by co-managers Just Fontaine and Robert Vicot. Jean-Pierre Dogliani was the team captain.

The 1975–76 season was Paris Saint-Germain's 6th season in existence. PSG mainly played their home league matches at the Parc des Princes in Paris, but once at the Stade Olympique Yves-du-Manoir in Colombes as well after reaching their 44-game quota at the Parc. The club registered an average attendance of 17,249 spectators per match. The club was presided by Daniel Hechter. The team was coached by co-managers Just Fontaine and Robert Vicot until August 1975, date after which Fontaine continued as the sole manager. Jean-Pierre Dogliani was the team captain until December 1975, when Fontaine replaced him with Humberto Coelho.

The 1976–77 season was Paris Saint-Germain's 7th season in existence. PSG mainly played their home league games at the Parc des Princes in Paris, but once at the Stade de Paris in Saint-Ouen-sur-Seine as well, registering an average attendance of 22,700 spectators per match. The club was presided by Daniel Hechter. The team was managed by Velibor Vasović until May 1977, when Pierre Alonzo and Ilija Pantelić took over as interim managers. Mustapha Dahleb was the team captain.

The 1977–78 season was Paris Saint-Germain's 8th season in existence. PSG mainly played their home league games at the Parc des Princes in Paris, but once at the Stade de Paris in Saint-Ouen-sur-Seine as well, registering an average attendance of 21,754 spectators per match. The club was presided by Daniel Hechter until January 1978, when Francis Borelli became the new president. The team was coached by player-manager Jean-Michel Larqué. Mustapha Dahleb was the team captain.

The 1982–83 season was Paris Saint-Germain's 13th season in existence. PSG played their home league games at the Parc des Princes in Paris, registering an average attendance of 24,420 spectators per match. The club was presided by Francis Borelli and the team was coached by Georges Peyroche. Dominique Bathenay was the team captain.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 "Histoire". PSG.FR. 19 March 2020. Archived from the original on 1 April 2020. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 "Histoire du Paris Saint Germain". PSG70. Archived from the original on 8 June 2017. Retrieved 2 April 2019.
  3. 1 2 "La création du PSG de 1970 à 1973". Paris United. 12 November 2018. Archived from the original on 7 March 2019. Retrieved 7 March 2019.
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "6 interesting facts you should know about Paris Saint Germain". Discover Walks Blog. 20 August 2018. Archived from the original on 8 August 2020. Retrieved 28 March 2019.
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 "Political and Organizational Factors of PSG". Sports and Leisure in France. Archived from the original on 27 March 2019. Retrieved 10 March 2019.
  6. "Association Paris Saint-Germain". 4 July 2020. Archived from the original on 6 July 2020. Retrieved 4 July 2020.
  7. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 "A brief history of PSG". ESPN.com. 17 August 2012. Archived from the original on 29 June 2021. Retrieved 16 December 2020.
  8. "Le jour où le PSG a investi le Parc". SoFoot. 13 August 2015. Archived from the original on 25 February 2018. Retrieved 3 April 2019.
  9. 1 2 "A brief history: Paris FC". thefootballcult – Medium. 16 January 2018. Archived from the original on 2 April 2019. Retrieved 2 April 2019.
  10. "PSG - Valenciennes 1974". PSG70. Archived from the original on 27 August 2020. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  11. 1 2 "The History of PSG - Why in Today's Money-Driven World, it's Important to Cherish Their Brief but Engrossing History". Soccer Manager Blog. 6 October 2015. Archived from the original on 2 April 2019. Retrieved 2 April 2019.
  12. "PSG firmly in the pantheon". FIFA.com. 17 October 2008. Archived from the original on 7 March 2021. Retrieved 18 June 2014.
  13. "Le Top 10 du PSG en Coupe d'Europe: De la Juve à Valence, de Liverpool au Bayern". Eurosport. 1 April 2013. Archived from the original on 5 April 2013. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  14. 1 2 3 "Période 1978 – 1991 : l'ère Borelli, là où tout a commencé". Paris United. 3 December 2018. Archived from the original on 4 April 2019. Retrieved 3 April 2019.
  15. "France's passion play". FIFA.com. 12 March 2009. Archived from the original on 7 March 2021. Retrieved 25 October 2009.
  16. 1 2 3 4 "L'histoire du PSG 1991-1998 : Le PSG devient un grand d'Europe". Paris United. 17 December 2018. Archived from the original on 9 April 2019. Retrieved 7 March 2019.
  17. "Facts about George Weah". SportMob. 7 December 2020. Archived from the original on 9 July 2021. Retrieved 8 July 2021.
  18. "1995/96: European first for Paris Saint-Germain". UEFA.com. 1 June 1996. Archived from the original on 3 May 2010. Retrieved 15 December 2020.
  19. "La Recopa del PSG, el último título europeo de clubes franceses". FutbolSapiens. 19 August 2020. Archived from the original on 25 January 2021. Retrieved 13 December 2020.
  20. 1 2 "En 1996, le PSG était déjà champion d'Europe". Ville de Paris. 19 August 2020. Archived from the original on 26 January 2021. Retrieved 13 December 2020.
  21. "1996 Super Cup: Dazzling Juve shine in Paris". UEFA.com. 17 October 2008. Archived from the original on 5 December 2020. Retrieved 6 December 2020.
  22. "1996/97: Ronaldo spot on for Barça". UEFA.com. 14 May 1997. Archived from the original on 3 May 2010. Retrieved 17 January 2021.
  23. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Le Palmarès du PSG". Histoire du PSG. Archived from the original on 1 May 2020. Retrieved 6 February 2020.
  24. 1 2 "OM-PSG: dix "clasicos" qui ont marqué les esprits". L'Express. 26 November 2011. Archived from the original on 26 October 2019. Retrieved 26 October 2019.
  25. 1 2 "Paris Saint-Germain, having conquered France, are still working on Qatar". The National. 30 December 2015. Archived from the original on 18 April 2017. Retrieved 17 April 2017.
  26. "Paris Saint-Germain hire Unai Emery as manager to replace Laurent Blanc". ESPN FC. 28 June 2016. Archived from the original on 9 August 2017. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  27. 1 2 3 "Paris Saint-Germain's Qatari owners have spent $1.17 billion on players". CNBC.com. 18 September 2018. Archived from the original on 18 September 2018. Retrieved 7 March 2019.
  28. 1 2 3 "PSG Have Spent €1.17Billion On Players And Still Haven't Got Past Champions League QF's". SPORTbible. 7 March 2019. Archived from the original on 26 March 2019. Retrieved 25 March 2019.
  29. 1 2 "Lionel Messi signs two-year Paris St-Germain deal after leaving Barcelona". BBC. 10 August 2021. Archived from the original on 11 August 2021. Retrieved 10 August 2021.
  30. "QSI à Paris : 10 ans déjà". PSG.FR. 28 June 2021. Archived from the original on 28 June 2021. Retrieved 28 June 2021.
  31. 1 2 "Camp Nou collapse, stunned by Man United - Recalling PSG's Champions League woes". FotMob. 17 December 2020. Archived from the original on 29 June 2021. Retrieved 17 December 2020.
  32. "Barcelona vs PSG referee 'facing Uefa demotion' after controversial performance". The Independent. 11 March 2017. Archived from the original on 12 November 2020. Retrieved 18 December 2020.
  33. "Paris St-Germain 0-1 Bayern Munich: German side win Champions League final". BBC. 23 August 2020. Archived from the original on 23 August 2020. Retrieved 6 October 2020.
  34. "Paris St-Germain 0-1 Bayern Munich (3-3 on agg): PSG beaten on night but into Champions League last four". BBC. 13 April 2021. Archived from the original on 13 April 2021. Retrieved 14 April 2021.
  35. 1 2 3 4 "Le PSG". Saint-Germain-en-Laye. Archived from the original on 6 November 2013. Retrieved 8 July 2013.
  36. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Things You Should Know About Paris Saint-Germain FC". Culture Trip. 14 December 2016. Archived from the original on 28 December 2019. Retrieved 28 December 2019.
  37. "Blasons, Logos, Écussons du PSG". PSG70. Archived from the original on 11 November 2011. Retrieved 7 October 2010.
  38. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Paris Saint-Germain, la capitale scintille en rouge et bleu". SO FOOT.com. 28 December 2015. Archived from the original on 17 April 2017. Retrieved 10 April 2017.
  39. 1 2 "Le PSG prend un nouveau virage". PSG.FR. 23 July 2010. Archived from the original on 19 August 2017. Retrieved 26 July 2010.
  40. "Allez Paris ! (par Annie Cordy)". Bide et Musique. Archived from the original on 1 October 2020. Retrieved 5 September 2020.
  41. "L'hommage du PSG à Annie Cordy, qui avait chanté le premier hymne du club". Maxifoot. 4 September 2020. Archived from the original on 17 January 2021. Retrieved 5 September 2020.
  42. "Allez Paris-Saint-Germain ! (par Les Parisiens)". Bide et Musique. Archived from the original on 11 August 2021. Retrieved 27 December 2019.
  43. 1 2 "PSG: Ecoutez l'hymne des Parisiens chanté par les joueurs !". Sportune. 22 March 2012. Archived from the original on 27 December 2019. Retrieved 27 December 2019.
  44. "Chronologie". Nouvel Obs. 1 June 2006. Archived from the original on 6 August 2020. Retrieved 10 March 2019.
  45. 1 2 "Les chants des supporters du PSG en vidéos". PSG MAG. 6 November 2009. Archived from the original on 28 December 2019. Retrieved 28 December 2019.
  46. "Comment "O Ville Lumière" est en train de pousser Phil Collins vers la sortie". L'Équipe. 19 December 2015. Archived from the original on 12 April 2016. Retrieved 17 July 2017.
  47. "VIDÉOS - Les chants les plus emblématiques des supporters dans les stades de foot en France". France Bleu. 20 April 2018. Archived from the original on 28 December 2019. Retrieved 28 December 2019.
  48. 1 2 "Kop of Boulogne, the story". SO FOOT.com. 5 March 2010. Archived from the original on 9 August 2019. Retrieved 24 September 2019.
  49. "PSG Ultràs are bringing the spark back to the Parc". Unusual Efforts. 16 November 2016. Archived from the original on 21 July 2019. Retrieved 6 October 2019.
  50. "Parc des Princes". The Blizzard. 4 September 2017. Archived from the original on 27 December 2019. Retrieved 27 December 2019.
  51. 1 2 3 "Can Paris Saint-Germain become the world's richest sports club?". Financial Times. 28 March 2014. Archived from the original on 14 July 2015. Retrieved 13 July 2015.
  52. "Paris is Earning". The Classical. 11 January 2012. Archived from the original on 31 January 2012. Retrieved 13 February 2012.
  53. "Simple erreur pour la musique d'entrée des joueurs, Phil Collins devrait rester au Parc des Princes". CulturePSG. 15 August 2021. Archived from the original on 15 August 2021. Retrieved 18 August 2021.
  54. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "L'historique des maillots du PSG : Les années 1970". Histoire du PSG. 4 May 2020. Archived from the original on 18 May 2020. Retrieved 4 May 2020.
  55. "Les maillots du PSG en Coupe de France". Histoire du PSG. 9 February 2021. Archived from the original on 15 May 2021. Retrieved 16 May 2021.
  56. "L'historique des maillots du PSG : Les années 2010". Histoire du PSG. 8 May 2020. Archived from the original on 13 May 2020. Retrieved 8 May 2020.
  57. 1 2 "At P.S.G., a Style Few Clubs Can Match". The New York Times. 3 November 2018. Archived from the original on 26 February 2019. Retrieved 8 March 2019.
  58. 1 2 3 "L'historique des maillots du PSG : Les années 1980". Histoire du PSG. 5 May 2020. Archived from the original on 18 May 2020. Retrieved 5 May 2020.
  59. 1 2 "L'historique des maillots du PSG : Les années 1990". Histoire du PSG. 6 May 2020. Archived from the original on 18 May 2020. Retrieved 6 May 2020.
  60. 1 2 "L'historique des maillots du PSG : Les années 2020". Histoire du PSG. 25 October 2020. Archived from the original on 4 November 2020. Retrieved 25 October 2020.
  61. "Il y a 43 ans, première au Parc des Princes, premier maillot Hechter". PSG Canal Supporters. 10 November 2016. Archived from the original on 17 July 2020. Retrieved 15 July 2020.
  62. 1 2 3 "Millième au Parc des Princes : ces dix matches qui ont fait l'histoire du PSG". Europe1. 9 September 2016. Archived from the original on 3 April 2019. Retrieved 3 April 2019.
  63. "L'historique des maillots du PSG : Les années 2000". Histoire du PSG. 7 May 2020. Archived from the original on 18 May 2020. Retrieved 7 May 2020.
  64. "The Crest Dissected – Paris Saint Germain". The Football History Boys. 11 April 2013. Archived from the original on 2 April 2019. Retrieved 2 April 2019.
  65. "Le grand retour du maillot Hechter blanc !". PSG.FR. 5 August 2020. Archived from the original on 25 January 2021. Retrieved 6 August 2020.
  66. "L'oeil d'Ambre sur… Le maillot Third". PSG.FR. 16 September 2019. Archived from the original on 22 July 2020. Retrieved 21 July 2020.
  67. 1 2 3 4 5 "L'écusson du PSG, évolution du logo à travers notre histoire". Histoire du PSG. 9 May 2020. Archived from the original on 13 May 2020. Retrieved 10 May 2020.
  68. "michel kollar on Twitter". michel kollar (@michelkollar). 30 August 2020. Archived from the original on 30 August 2020. Retrieved 30 August 2020.
  69. 1 2 "PSG dreams bigger with its new brand logo by Dragon Rouge". Dragon Rouge. 22 February 2013. Archived from the original on 16 November 2018. Retrieved 8 March 2019.
  70. 1 2 3 4 "Anecdotes autour du Tournoi de Paris". PSG.FR. 12 July 2010. Archived from the original on 19 August 2017. Retrieved 23 January 2011.
  71. 1 2 "Tournoi Indoor de Paris-Bercy". RSSSF. 5 October 2003. Archived from the original on 10 January 2017. Retrieved 12 August 2018.
  72. "Há 60 anos, Vasco derrotava o Real Madrid de Di Stéfano em Paris". Globo Esporte. 14 June 2017. Archived from the original on 7 November 2017. Retrieved 4 November 2017.
  73. "PSG-Barcelone 2–2 : une soirée pleine de promesses". Le Parisien. 4 August 2012. Archived from the original on 23 September 2017. Retrieved 24 February 2017.
  74. "Parc des Princes". PSG.FR. Archived from the original on 19 August 2017. Retrieved 19 July 2017.
  75. "1973 – 1978 : Paris se replace sur la scène française". Paris United. 19 November 2018. Archived from the original on 8 March 2019. Retrieved 7 March 2019.
  76. 1 2 "Le PSG et Manchester City, les faux jumeaux". Le Monde. 5 April 2016. Archived from the original on 3 April 2019. Retrieved 2 April 2019.
  77. 1 2 "Stade municipal Georges Lefèvre". Saint-Germain-en-Laye. Archived from the original on 19 August 2016. Retrieved 9 July 2016.
  78. "Le Camp des loges à St-Germain". Actu.fr. 26 June 2016. Archived from the original on 10 June 2021. Retrieved 10 June 2021.
  79. "Présentation du nouveau centre d'entraînement". PSG.FR. 3 November 2008. Archived from the original on 19 August 2017. Retrieved 9 July 2016.
  80. "Ooredoo, nouveau partenaire du Paris Saint-Germain". PSG.FR. 12 September 2013. Archived from the original on 19 August 2017. Retrieved 9 July 2016.
  81. 1 2 "Qu'est-ce que le Paris Saint-Germain Training Center ?". PSG.FR. Archived from the original on 11 August 2021. Retrieved 16 September 2019.
  82. "Pourquoi le choix du site de Poncy, à Poissy ?". PSG.FR. Archived from the original on 6 August 2020. Retrieved 16 September 2019.
  83. "Le campus PSG dévoile un nouveau site et de nouveaux visuels". CulturePSG. 25 July 2018. Archived from the original on 18 July 2019. Retrieved 18 July 2019.
  84. 1 2 "Le centre d'entraînement du PSG à Poissy sera finalement livré en 2022". Le Parisien. 16 July 2019. Archived from the original on 18 July 2019. Retrieved 18 July 2019.
  85. "Le PSG s'installera à Poissy en juin 2023 (L'E)". CulturePSG. 1 April 2021. Archived from the original on 10 June 2021. Retrieved 10 June 2021.
  86. "Le PSG choisit Poissy pour son futur centre d'entraînement". Le Parisien. 11 July 2016. Archived from the original on 18 July 2019. Retrieved 18 July 2019.
  87. "Que deviendra le Centre Ooredoo ?". PSG.FR. Archived from the original on 3 July 2020. Retrieved 16 September 2019.
  88. 1 2 "The Top 15 Biggest and Most Supported Football Teams in the World". Zeelo Blog. 19 April 2019. Archived from the original on 20 September 2019. Retrieved 12 September 2019.
  89. "PSG – OM : Ces stars qui supportent le Paris Saint-Germain". Non Stop People. 17 March 2019. Archived from the original on 10 April 2019. Retrieved 8 April 2019.
  90. 1 2 3 4 "Histoire des Supporters du Paris Saint-Germain Football Club 1904/2010 (saison par saison)". Ultras Paris!. Archived from the original on 6 August 2020. Retrieved 24 September 2019.
  91. 1 2 3 "1973–1978 : Naissance d'une ferveur". Paris United. 25 November 2018. Archived from the original on 20 September 2019. Retrieved 20 September 2019.
  92. "Plan du Parc". PSG.FR. Archived from the original on 3 March 2017. Retrieved 2 March 2017.
  93. 1 2 3 "Période 1978 – 1991 : l'ambiance du Parc". Paris United. 7 December 2018. Archived from the original on 20 September 2019. Retrieved 20 September 2019.
  94. 1 2 "L'histoire du PSG période 1991–1998 : L'émergence des groupes de supporters". Paris United. 26 December 2018. Archived from the original on 20 September 2019. Retrieved 20 September 2019.
  95. 1 2 "L'histoire du PSG 1998–2006 : chaud le Parc !". Paris United. 4 January 2019. Archived from the original on 20 September 2019. Retrieved 20 September 2019.
  96. 1 2 "Histoire du PSG période 2006 – 2011, les tribunes : VA-KOB, à la vie à la mort". Paris United. 22 February 2019. Archived from the original on 20 September 2019. Retrieved 20 September 2019.
  97. 1 2 3 4 5 "Why the return of Paris Saint-Germain's ultras is such a big deal". ESPN FC. 12 November 2016. Archived from the original on 23 November 2016. Retrieved 22 November 2016.
  98. "Des groupes contestataires créent le " collectif ultras Paris "". La Grinta. 23 February 2016. Archived from the original on 24 September 2019. Retrieved 24 September 2019.
  99. "Incidents face à l'Etoile Rouge : qui sont les ultras du PSG ?". Le Parisien. 5 October 2018. Archived from the original on 6 October 2018. Retrieved 30 November 2019.
  100. "PSG : au Parc de Princes, les ultras tentent de s'imposer côté Boulogne". Le Parisien. 24 September 2019. Archived from the original on 23 November 2019. Retrieved 30 November 2019.
  101. 1 2 "Everything You Need to Know About Le Classique Rivalry Between PSG and Marseille". Bleacher Report. 28 February 2014. Archived from the original on 9 July 2021. Retrieved 8 July 2021.
  102. "Du Classico au Classique ?". CulturePSG. 26 October 2019. Archived from the original on 28 October 2019. Retrieved 29 October 2019.
  103. "The top 50 football derbies on the world 20-11". Mirror Online. 13 April 2018. Archived from the original on 29 March 2019. Retrieved 29 March 2019.
  104. "The 50 biggest derbies in world football". FourFourTwo. 12 December 2020. Archived from the original on 4 February 2021. Retrieved 7 February 2021.
  105. 1 2 3 4 5 "Joey Barton puts the "punch" back into the Marseille-PSG rivalry". Bleacher Report. 4 September 2012. Archived from the original on 3 October 2012. Retrieved 29 July 2013.
  106. "Quand les vitres du car du PSG ont pété". France Football. 30 March 2015. Archived from the original on 14 February 2021. Retrieved 6 February 2021.
  107. 1 2 "Marseille vs PSG: France's bitter and violent north-south divide laid bare". FourFourTwo. 1 June 2003. Archived from the original on 7 November 2017. Retrieved 3 November 2017.
  108. 1 2 "'A Pistol Against a Tank'—The Ultras' View on the PSG vs. Marseille Rivalry". Bleacher Report. 28 February 2018. Archived from the original on 10 April 2019. Retrieved 10 April 2019.
  109. 1 2 3 "'Le Classique', French football's fallen icon". France 24. 16 March 2019. Archived from the original on 25 October 2019. Retrieved 25 October 2019.
  110. 1 2 "Le Qatar sans limite". Le Parisien. 7 March 2012. Archived from the original on 6 December 2016. Retrieved 7 March 2012.
  111. "PSG's Qatari owners tap Neymar to promote QNB". SportsPro Media. 10 December 2018. Archived from the original on 3 August 2020. Retrieved 27 March 2019.
  112. "Paris Saint-Germain: Can world's richest club rule Europe?". The Independent. 7 August 2012. Archived from the original on 27 March 2019. Retrieved 11 March 2019.
  113. "PSG v Manchester City emblematic of how Gulf rivals are fuelling football". The Guardian. 5 April 2016. Archived from the original on 9 March 2019. Retrieved 11 March 2019.
  114. 1 2 "PSG's Champions League fortunes won't change until the club changes its zero-sum gamesmanship". Yahoo! Sports. 6 March 2019. Archived from the original on 7 March 2019. Retrieved 7 March 2019.
  115. "Al-Thani, Al-Khelaïfi, Blanc, Henrique : qui dirige vraiment le PSG ?". Le Parisien. 5 May 2018. Archived from the original on 27 March 2019. Retrieved 27 March 2019.
  116. "Profile: Qatar Emir, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani". BBC News. 25 June 2013. Archived from the original on 27 March 2019. Retrieved 27 March 2019.
  117. "Football Leaks : les contrats surévalués du PSG version qatarie". Le Monde. 2 November 2018. Archived from the original on 6 March 2019. Retrieved 7 March 2019.
  118. "Deloitte Football Money League 2021". Deloitte. 26 January 2021. Archived from the original on 26 January 2021. Retrieved 26 January 2021.
  119. "Paris Saint-Germain on the Forbes Soccer Team Valuations List". Forbes. Archived from the original on 14 May 2020. Retrieved 15 May 2020.
  120. 1 2 "Fin du contrat avec Qatar Tourism Authority : le PSG vers un nouveau modèle économique". Le Parisien. 4 July 2019. Retrieved 4 July 2019.
  121. "PSG Jordan Deal Extended Until 2022". Footy Headlines. 6 January 2021. Retrieved 14 May 2021.
  122. 1 2 "Why Paris Saint-Germain's Financial Statements Qualify As Fiction". Forbes. 21 July 2013. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 25 January 2017.
  123. "Le PSG a cumulé 300 M€ de déficit depuis 1998". PSG MAG. 30 June 2011. Archived from the original on 27 November 2018. Retrieved 11 March 2019.
  124. "Statistiques". Histoire du PSG. 13 May 2017. Archived from the original on 26 November 2020. Retrieved 22 November 2020.
  125. "Listes des saisons". Histoire du PSG. Archived from the original on 6 August 2020. Retrieved 7 July 2020.
  126. "victoire à l'ICC : PSG, 22 ans après". Paris.canal-historique. 30 July 2015. Archived from the original on 6 August 2020. Retrieved 18 August 2020.
  127. "Trophée national du meilleur public sportif - Football Division II". Collection privée Valjustrotinou. 24 December 2018. Archived from the original on 23 April 2020. Retrieved 16 July 2020.
  128. "27 mars 2001, il y a 20 ans, la belle histoire de Lahcen Chakir au PSG". Collection privée Valjustrotinou. 27 March 2021. Archived from the original on 27 March 2021. Retrieved 29 March 2021.
  129. "Le Paris Saint-Germain et les finales européennes, acte 3 !". PSG.FR. 21 August 2020. Archived from the original on 11 August 2021. Retrieved 21 August 2020.
  130. "Ligue 1 Uber Eats : la longévité des clubs à la loupe". Ligue 1 Uber Eats. 11 February 2021. Archived from the original on 12 February 2021. Retrieved 11 February 2021.
  131. "Défense parfaite en Coupe de France : et de 3 pour le PSG !". Histoire du PSG. 4 April 2019. Archived from the original on 4 April 2019. Retrieved 4 April 2019.
  132. "Le PSG reste au sommet". LFP.fr. 1 April 2017. Archived from the original on 2 April 2017. Retrieved 1 April 2017.
  133. "Le PSG en Coupe de France : 4 à la suite, record national !". LFP.fr. 8 May 2018. Archived from the original on 2 April 2017. Retrieved 9 May 2018.
  134. "Paris St-Germain: Mauricio Pochettino wins first trophy of managerial career". BBC. 13 January 2021. Archived from the original on 14 January 2021. Retrieved 13 January 2021.
  135. "Coupe de la Ligue : Les chiffres clés avant PSG-Lyon". Orange Sports. 28 July 2020. Archived from the original on 29 July 2020. Retrieved 4 August 2020.
  136. "PSG win Coupe de la Ligue to complete domestic quadruple". theScore.com. 31 July 2020. Archived from the original on 11 August 2021. Retrieved 1 August 2020.
  137. 1 2 "Equipe première". PSG.FR. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  138. 1 2 "Marquinhos capitaine du PSG, Kimpembe présenté comme vice-capitaine". CulturePSG. 15 September 2020. Archived from the original on 16 September 2020. Retrieved 16 September 2020.
  139. "Emir of Qatar's brother confirms Lionel Messi will be signing for PSG". Sportskeeda. 7 August 2021. Archived from the original on 11 August 2021. Retrieved 13 August 2021.
  140. "Délégation réduite pour le PSG en Champions League". CulturePSG. 3 August 2020. Archived from the original on 20 January 2021. Retrieved 13 August 2021.