Parishes of Jersey

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The Channel Island of Jersey is divided into twelve administrative districts or parishes. All have access to the sea and share a name with their ancient parish churches.

Channel Islands Archipelago in the English Channel

The Channel Islands are an archipelago in the English Channel, off the French coast of Normandy. They include two Crown dependencies: the Bailiwick of Jersey, which is the largest of the islands; and the Bailiwick of Guernsey, consisting of Guernsey, Alderney, Sark and some smaller islands. They are considered the remnants of the Duchy of Normandy and, although they are not part of the United Kingdom, the UK is responsible for the defence and international relations of the islands. The Crown dependencies are not members of the Commonwealth of Nations or of the European Union. They have a total population of about 164,541, and the bailiwicks' capitals, Saint Helier and Saint Peter Port, have populations of 33,500 and 18,207, respectively. The total area of the islands is 198 km2.

Jersey British Crown Dependency

Jersey, officially the Bailiwick of Jersey, is a Crown dependency located near the coast of Normandy, France. It is the second closest of the Channel Islands to France, after Alderney.

Contents

The parishes

This is a list of parishes of Jersey. The population figures are as reported in the 2011 census. [1]

Parish Population Area
in km²(mi²)
Rank
by area
Density
(people/km²)
Notes
Blason ville uk Saint-Helier (Jersey).svg Saint Helier 33,52210.6 (4.1)53,200Incorporating the island's capital
Blason ville uk Grouville (Jersey).svg Grouville 4,8667.8 (3.0)10620Historically Saint Martin de Grouville; incorporating Les Minquiers
Blason St Brelade Jersey.svg Saint Brélade 10,56812.8 (4.9)2830
Blason ville uk Saint-Clement (Jersey).svg Saint Clement 9,2214.2 (1.6)122,200
Blason ville uk Saint-Jean (Jersey).svg Saint John 2,9118.7 (3.4)9330
Blason Saint Lawrence Jersey.svg Saint Lawrence 5,4189.5 (3.7)7570
Blason ville uk Saint-Martin (Jersey).svg Saint Martin 3,76310.3 (4.0)6370Historically Saint Martin le Vieux; incorporating Les Écréhous
Blason ville uk Sainte-Marie (Jersey).svg Saint Mary 1,7526.5 (2.5)11270
Blason ville uk Saint-Ouen (Jersey).svg Saint Ouen 4,09715 (6.0)1270
Blason ville uk Saint-Pierre (Jersey).svg Saint Peter 5,00311.6 (4.5)4430
Blason ville uk Saint-Sauveur (Jersey).svg Saint Saviour 13,5809.3 (3.6)81,500
Trinity-Parish-Jersey-Coat-of-Arms.svg Trinity 3,15612.3 (4.7)3260

Map of parishes

Map of the parishes of Jersey Jersey.png
Map of the parishes of Jersey

Municipal structure

Constable

Each parish is headed by a Constable (French: Connétable; Jèrriais: Connêtabl'ye) who is elected for a four-year period by the residents of the Parish. The Constable (or Connétable) also represents the municipality in the States. [2]

Connétables in Jersey and Guernsey are the elected heads of the Parishes. They are often called 'constables' in English. The constables are entitled each to carry a silver-tipped baton of office.

Jersey Legal French official dialect of French used administratively in Jersey

Jersey Legal French, also known as Jersey French, was the official dialect of French used administratively in Jersey. Since the anglicisation of the island, it survives as a written language for some laws, contracts, and other documents. Jersey's parliament, the States of Jersey, is part of the Assemblée parlementaire de la Francophonie. The use of the English language has been allowed in legislative debates since 2 February 1900; the current use of French in the States of Jersey is generally restricted to certain limited official state functions and formalities.

Jèrriais is the form of the Norman language spoken in Jersey, one of the Channel Islands off the coast of France. It has been in decline over the past century as English has increasingly become the language of education, commerce and administration. There are very few people who speak Jèrriais as a mother tongue and, owing to the age of the remaining speakers, their numbers decrease annually. Despite this, efforts are being made to keep the language alive.

Procureur du Bien Public

The Procureur du Bien Public (two in each parish) is the legal and financial representative of the parish (elected at a public election since 2003 in accordance with the Public Elections (Amendment) (Jersey) Law 2003; formerly an Assembly of Electors of each parish elected the procureurs in accordance with the Loi (1804) au sujet des assemblées paroissiales). A Procureur du Bien Public is elected for a mandate of three years as a public trustee for the funds and property of the parish and to be empowered to enter into contracts on behalf of the parish if so authorised by a Parish Assembly.

Procureur du Bien Public

A Procureur du Bien Public is the legal and financial representative of a parish in Jersey. Procureurs are elected for a term of three years.

Centeniers are elected at a public election within each parish for a term of three years to undertake policing within the parish. The centenier is the only officer authorised to charge and bail offenders. Formerly, the senior centenier of each parish (known as the Chef de Police) was the Constable's deputy in the States of Jersey when the Constable was unable to attend a sitting of the States this function has been abolished.

Roads Committee

A Roads Committee of five elected principals is also available to offer advice on a range of issues; chiefly related to the roads. Centeniers are the highest ranking police officers in Jersey and are elected.

Roads Committee

In Jersey, the Roads Committee is the highway authority for Parish roads in each Parish. In accordance with the Loi (1914) sur la Voirie it superintends the repair and maintenance of by-roads in the Parish, establishes boundary stones, issues Choses Publiques licenses, examines planning applications that fall within its responsibilities, supervises refuse collection, adjudicates fines during the Visite du Branchage, and proposes new road names, as may be necessary, for approval by the Parish Assembly. The Connétable presides over the Roads Committee which also includes the Rector and three Principals of the Parish [five Principals for St Helier] elected for a term of three years by the Parish Assembly.

Police Law enforcement body

The police are a constituted body of persons empowered by a state to enforce the law, to protect the lives, liberty and possessions of citizens, and to prevent crime and civil disorder. Their powers include the power of arrest and the legitimized use of force. The term is most commonly associated with the police forces of a sovereign state that are authorized to exercise the police power of that state within a defined legal or territorial area of responsibility. Police forces are often defined as being separate from the military and other organizations involved in the defense of the state against foreign aggressors; however, gendarmerie are military units charged with civil policing. Police forces are usually public sector services, funded through taxes.

Road marker stone in Saint Ouen dated 1935 inscribed with the names of the Roads Committee Road marker St Ouen Jersey 1935.jpg
Road marker stone in Saint Ouen dated 1935 inscribed with the names of the Roads Committee

In Jersey, the Roads Committee (French: Comité des Chemins) is the highway authority for parish roads in each parish. In accordance with the Loi (1914) sur la Voirie it superintends the repair and maintenance of by-roads in the parish, establishes boundary stones, issues Choses Publiques licenses, examines planning applications that fall within its responsibilities, supervises refuse collection, adjudicates fines during the Visite du Branchage, and proposes new road names, as may be necessary, for approval by the Parish Assembly. The Connétable presides over the Roads Committee which also includes the Rector and three Principals of the Parish [five Principals for St Helier] elected for a term of three years by the Parish Assembly.

Instructions are passed to Roads Inspectors whose duty it is to ensure that the repairs are carried out.

In St. Helier, the larger Roads Committee also undertakes additional non-statutory responsibilities with regard to parks and other matters, and acts, in the absence of a municipal council, as an advisory body to the Connétable. By convention, the two Procureur du Bien Public of St. Helier attend meetings of the Roads Committee, but cannot vote.

Vingtaines

The Parish is further divided into Vingtaines (or in Saint Ouen cueillettes). Each vingtaine is represented by two Vingteniers, two Roads Inspectors and three Constable's Officers. All are elected and sworn officers of the Royal Court.

Honorary Police

A recruiting banner for the Honorary Police showing the arms of each parish: (from left to right) Grouville, St Brelade, St John, Trinity, St Saviour, St Ouen, St Helier, St Mary, St Lawrence, St Clement, St Peter, St Martin Honorary Police banner Jersey.jpg
A recruiting banner for the Honorary Police showing the arms of each parish: (from left to right) Grouville, St Brelade, St John, Trinity, St Saviour, St Ouen, St Helier, St Mary, St Lawrence, St Clement, St Peter, St Martin

There is an Honorary Police (French: Police Honorifique) force in each parish in Jersey.

Honorary Police officers have, for centuries, been elected by parishioners to assist the Connétable of the Parish to maintain law and order. Officers are elected as Centeniers, Vingteniers or Constable's Officers each with various duties and responsibilities.

The Honorary Police provided the only law enforcement prior to the appointment of paid police officers for the Parish of Saint Helier in 1853 and later to serve the whole Island. The Honorary Police still provide an essential and very valuable service to the parish and community.

These officers are elected for a period of three years and take an oath in the Royal Court.

All Honorary Police officers must live in the Parish at the time of their first election or, in the case of St Helier, be a ratepayer or mandataire of that Parish. If an officer moves out of the Parish during her/his term of office, s/he may continue her/his term of office with the approval of the Attorney General and the Connétable of the Parish and may stand for re-election provided there is no break in service.

A person may be nominated for election as a member of the Honorary Police if, on the day of nomination, s/he is at least 20 years of age and less than 70 years of age.

Honorary Police officers are on duty for one week at a time, usually every 3 or 4 weeks depending upon the roster within the Parish, and are on call 24 hours a day during that period. Honorary Police officers are elected to serve the Parish but in certain circumstances may assist or operate outside the Parish.

Anyone standing for election as a member of the Honorary Police will have to undergo a criminal record check.

Roads Inspectors

The Parish Assembly elects two Roads Inspectors for each Vingtaine [or Cueillette in St Ouen] for a three-year term of office in accordance with the Loi (1914) sur la Voirie. Roads Inspectors are responsible for the repair of by-roads of the Parish and have to ensure the instructions of the Roads Committee are carried out.

In the Parish of St Helier, the Roads Inspectors also undertake additional non-statutory responsibilities with regard to the policing of infractions of the Road Traffic Act (Jersey) and other areas of the law within the parochial remit such as dog licensing and fly posting. They also serve as conduits of information to the Honorary Police.

They chief role is the annual Visite du Branchage and the triennial Visite Royale.

Supplementary bodies are also elected to serve specific needs; in the largest parish St Helier these include; the Accounts Committee, the Welfare Board, and the Youth Council.

Matters of import are brought before a gathering of the municipality and members of the public for consideration and vote.

In order to maintain the historic ties to the Church of England a Rectorate comprising the Connétable and Procureurs, and the Rector and Churchwardens. Overseas the operation of the largest church within the Parochial boundary.

Parish Assembly

A Parish Assembly in Jersey is the decision-making body of local government, comprising ratepayers (including mandataires) and electors of the parish.

The Parish Assembly:

Related Research Articles

Politics of Jersey

Politics of the Bailiwick of Jersey takes place in a framework of a parliamentary representative democratic constitution.

Saint Helier Jersey parish

Saint Helier is one of the twelve parishes of Jersey, the largest of the Channel Islands in the English Channel. St Helier has a population of about 33,500, roughly 34.2% of the total population of Jersey, and is the capital of the Island. The urban area of the parish of St Helier makes up most of the largest town in Jersey, although some of the town area is situated in adjacent St Saviour, with suburbs sprawling into St Lawrence and St Clement. The greater part of St Helier is rural.

Elections in Jersey

Elections in Jersey take place for the Assembly of the States of Jersey and at parish-level. Various parties have been formed over the years in Jersey, but few candidates stand for election affiliated to any political party. All elections in Jersey use the First-past-the-post voting system. In 2008, the voting age was reduced to 16 years.

Saint Clement, Jersey Jersey parish

Saint Clement is one of the twelve parishes of Jersey in the Channel Islands. It is in the south east of the Island, and contains some of the suburbs of Saint Helier. It is the smallest parish by surface area, but the second most densely populated. St. Clement stretches west to east from Le Dicq to within a quarter mile of La Rocque harbour. Its surface area is around 1,044 acres (4.22 km2).

Vingtaine political subdivision of Jersey in the Channel Islands

A vingtaine is a political subdivision of Jersey. They are subdivisions of the various parishes of Jersey, and one, La Vingtaine de la Ville, in Saint Helier is further divided into two cantons.

Vingtaine du Rouge Bouillon Vingtaine in Saint Helier

The Vingtaine du Rouge Bouillon is one of the six vingtaines of St. Helier Parish in the Channel Island of Jersey.

The Vingtaine du Mont à l'Abbé is one of six vingtaines of the Parish of Saint Helier in the Channel Island of Jersey.

Vingtaine du Mont Cochon is one of the six vingtaines of the Parish of St. Helier, in the Channel Island of Jersey. It is close to St Lawrence.

A Roads Inspector is a statutory office in Jersey responsible for the maintenance of public highways.

Parish Assembly (Jersey)

A Parish Assembly in Jersey is the decision-making body of local government, comprising ratepayers and electors of the parish.

Visite du Branchage

A Visite du Branchage is an inspection of roads in Jersey and Guernsey to ensure property owners have complied with the laws against vegetation encroaching onto the road.

Honorary Police

There is an Honorary Police force in each of the 12 parishes of Jersey. Members of the Honorary Police are elected by the voters of the parish in which they serve, and are unpaid.

Roads in Jersey highway system

Roads in Jersey are labelled "A", "B" or "C" in a similar scheme used in Great Britain, Northern Ireland and the Isle of Man. The maximum speed limit on Jersey's roads is 40 mph. On the 18th of January, Transport Minister Deputy Kevin Lewis announced that the speed limit on several Jersey roads will be lowered to 30 miles per hour. Deputy Lewis said that changes came following requests from parish officials.

Vingtaine de Faldouet vingtaine in Saint Martin, Jersey

Vingtaine de Faldouet is one of the five vingtaines of St Martin in the Channel Island of Jersey. The vingtaine is situated in the north-east of the parish, bordering the coast.

Vingtaine de l'Église is one of the five vingtaines of St Martin in the Channel Island of Jersey.

Vingtaine du Fief de la Reine is one of the five vingtaines of St Martin in the Channel Island of Jersey. The Vingtenier du Fief de la Reine is currently Mr D West as enrolled through the Honorary Police of St Martin. The Connétable of St Martin is Ms K Shenton Stone, as elected unopposed in the 2018 Jersey General Election. In Jerriais, the vingtaine is known as La Vîngtaine du Fief du Rouai.

References

  1. Report on the 2011 Jersey Census Archived 1 March 2014 at the Wayback Machine .
  2. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 30 November 2012. Retrieved 4 February 2013.

See also