Park Chung-hee

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    Sources

    Park Chung-hee
    박정희
    朴正熙
    Park Chung-hee.jpg
    Official portrait
    5·6·7·8·9th President of South Korea
    In office
    24 March 1962 – 26 October 1979
    Acting to 17 December 1963
    Political offices
    Preceded by
    President of South Korea
    17 December 1963 – 26 October 1979
    Succeeded by