Parley

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The Parley by Frederic Remington, 1903, depicting a settler parleying with a Native American. Frederic Remington - The Parley - Google Art Project.jpg
The Parley by Frederic Remington, 1903, depicting a settler parleying with a Native American.

A parley (from French: parler – "to speak") refers to a discussion or conference, especially one designed to end an argument or hostilities between two groups of people. The term can be used in both past and present tense; in present tense the term is referred to as parleying. [1] [2] [3] [4]

The term "parley" has been used to refer to numerous high-profile meetings of the 20th century, including the London and Paris Conferences held in 1954 to determine the status of West Germany. [5]

Below are some examples where a parley is a significant element of the plot.

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References

  1. "parley". Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary . Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press . Retrieved November 15, 2020.
  2. "parley". Oxford Dictionary of English . Oxford, England: Oxford University Press . Retrieved November 15, 2020.
  3. "parley". Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary . Springfield, United States: Merriam-Webster . Retrieved November 15, 2020.
  4. "parley". Collins English Dictionary . Glasgow, Scotland: HarperCollins . Retrieved November 15, 2020.
  5. "At NATO, a diplomatic triumph for Dulles". Life . New York City, United States: Henry Luce. May 19, 1957. Retrieved November 15, 2020.
  6. PenzeyMoog, Caitlin (July 9, 2017). "Fear The Walking Dead highlights how awful white people are". AV Club.