Patriarch Diodoros of Jerusalem

Last updated

Diodoros or Diodorus Greek : Διόδωρος; born Damianos G. Karivalis Greek : Δαμιανός Γ. Καρίβαλης (August 14, 1923 – December 20, 2000) was the Patriarch of Jerusalem in the Eastern Orthodox Patriarchate of Jerusalem from 1980 to 2000.

He was born on the Greek island of Chios on August 14, 1923. He became a monk in 1943 and was renamed Diodoros. Three years later he became a priest, then an archbishop of Hierapolis in 1965. He served in Hierapolis prior to his election and was Patriarchal Exarch in Amman, Jordan, until 1980 when he was raised to the Patriarchate.

Related Research Articles

Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople Highest position in the Eastern Orthodox Church

The ecumenical patriarch is the archbishop of Constantinople–New Rome and ranks as primus inter pares among the heads of the several autocephalous churches that make up the Eastern Orthodox Church. He is regarded as the representative and spiritual leader of Orthodox Christians worldwide. The term ecumenical in the title is a historical reference to the Ecumene, a Greek designation for the civilised world, i.e. the Roman Empire, and it stems from Canon 28 of the Council of Chalcedon.

Bartholomew I of Constantinople Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople

Bartholomew I is the 270th and current archbishop of Constantinople and ecumenical patriarch, since 2 November 1991. In accordance with his title, he is regarded as the primus inter pares in the Eastern Orthodox Church, and as the spiritual leader of approximately 300 million Orthodox Christians worldwide.

Patriarch ecclesiastical title

The highest-ranking bishops in Eastern Orthodoxy, Oriental Orthodoxy, the Catholic Church, and the Church of the East are termed patriarchs.

Greek Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem primate of the Eastern Orthodox Church in Jerusalem

The Greek Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem or Eastern Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem, officially Patriarch of Jerusalem, is the head bishop of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Jerusalem, ranking fourth of nine Patriarchs in the Eastern Orthodox Church. Since 2005, the Eastern Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem has been Theophilos III. The Patriarch is styled "Patriarch of the Holy City of Jerusalem and all Holy Land, Syria, beyond the Jordan River, Cana of Galilee, and Holy Zion." The Patriarch is the head of the Brotherhood of the Holy Sepulchre, and the religious leader of about 130,000 Eastern Orthodox Christians in the Holy Land, most of them Palestinians.

Flavian II of Antioch was the Patriarch of Antioch from 498 until his deposition in 512.

Greek Orthodox Church of Antioch Christian Eastern Orthodox-oriented jursidiction in Greece and the Middle East

The Greek Orthodox Church of Antioch, also known as the Antiochian Orthodox Church and legally as the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Antioch and All the East, is an autocephalous Greek Orthodox Church within the wider communion of Eastern Orthodox Christianity. Headed by the Greek Orthodox Patriarch of Antioch, it considers itself the successor to the Christian community founded in Antioch by the Apostles Peter and Paul.

Greek Orthodox Church of Jerusalem

The Greek Orthodox Church of Jerusalem, officially called simply the Patriarchate of Jerusalem, is an autocephalous Church within the wider communion of the Eastern Orthodox Christianity. It is headed by the Greek Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem, the incumbent being Theophilos III since 2005. Christians believe that it was in Jerusalem that the Church was established on the day of Pentecost with the descent of the Holy Spirit on the disciples of Jesus Christ and that the Gospel of Christ spread from Jerusalem. The Church celebrates its liturgy in the Byzantine Rite, whose original language is Koine Greek, the original language of the New Testament, and follows its own calendar of feasts, preserving the Julian calendar. It is also often called "Σιωνίτις Εκκλησία".

Irenaios Skopelitis was the 140th patriarch of the Eastern Orthodox Patriarchate of Jerusalem from 2000 to 2005, though the dismissal was disputed.

Melkite Greek Catholic Church Eastern Catholic Church

The Melkite Greek Catholic Church is an Eastern Catholic Church in full communion with the Holy See as part of the worldwide Catholic Church. It is headed by Patriarch Youssef Absi, S.M.S.P., headquartered in Cathedral of Our Lady of the Dormition, Damascus, Syria. The Melkites, Byzantine Rite Catholics, trace their history to the early Christians of Antioch, formerly part of Syria and now in Turkey, of the 1st century AD, where Christianity was introduced by Saint Peter.

Metropolitan Cornelius of Petra is a senior bishop of the Eastern Orthodox Patriarchate of Jerusalem. He was locum tenens of the Church in 2001, following the death of Patriarch Diodoros I. He served as locum tenens again from 30 May 2005, after the deposition of Irenaios I on 6 May, until the election of Theophilos III on 22 August.

Melkite Catholic Patriarchate of Antioch patriarchate

The Melkite Catholic Patriarchate of Antioch is the only actual residential Patriarchate of the Melkite Greek Catholic Church. It was formed in 1724 when a portion of the Orthodox Church of Antioch went into communion with Rome, becoming an Eastern Catholic Church, while the rest of the ancient Patriarchate continues in full communion with the rest of the Eastern Orthodox Church.

Patriarch Theophilos III of Jerusalem Patriarch of Jerusalem

Patriarch Theophilos III of Jerusalem is the current Patriarch of the Orthodox Church of Jerusalem. He is styled "Patriarch of the Holy City of Jerusalem and all Palestine and Israel."

Autocephalous Turkish Orthodox Patriarchate Orthodox Christian denomination in Turkey

The Autocephalous Turkish Orthodox Patriarchate, also referred to as the Turkish Orthodox Church, is an unrecognised Orthodox Christian denomination, with strong influences from Turkish nationalist ideology.

Theodosios (Hanna) Israeli archbishop

Theodosios (Hanna) of Sebastia is the Archbishop of Sebastia from the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Jerusalem. He is often named in Western news sources as Atallah Hanna, Atallah and Theodosios both meaning "gift of God" in Arabic and Greek, respectively. Theodosios, who was ordained on the 24 December 2005 at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, is the second Palestinian to hold the position of archbishop in the history of the diocese.

Patriarch Cyril VI Tanas, also known as Cyril VI of Antioch, became the first Patriarch of Antioch and All the East, and Alexandria and Jerusalem of the Melkite Greek Catholic Church following the schism of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Antioch in 1724. Cyril re-established full communion with the Catholic Church.

Dositheos II of Jerusalem Patriarch of Jerusalem

Dositheos II Notaras of Jerusalem was the Greek Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem between 1669 and 1707 and a theologian of the Orthodox Church. He was known for standing against influences of the Roman Catholic and Protestant Churches. He convened the Synod of Jerusalem to counter the Calvinist confessions of Cyril Lucaris.

Papa Eftim I Patriarch of the Turkish Orthodox Church

Papa Eftim I, was a Turkish bishop, who was the first Turkish Orthodox Patriarch of the Autocephalous Turkish Orthodox Patriarchate, an unrecognised Orthodox Christian denomination, that he founded. Eftim I had strong influences from Turkish nationalist ideology. He ruled as Patriarch from 1923 until 1962, when he resigned due to ill health. Keeping the title of honorary patriarch, he ordained his younger son as patriarch assuming the name Papa Eftim II.

Benedict I of Jerusalem Eastern Orthodox Patriarch

Patriarch Benedict of Jerusalem, also Benediktos I of Jerusalem, born Vasileios Papadopoulos was the Patriarch of Jerusalem of the Greek Orthodox Church of Jerusalem from 1957 to 1980.

Gregory IV of Antioch

Gregory IV (Haddad) of Antioch was the Greek Orthodox Patriarch of Antioch from 1906 to 1928. He was a recipient of the Order of Saint Alexander Nevsky. He was the second Syrian Arabic-speaking patriarch to become Patriarch of Antioch after the position had been held by ethnic Greek bishops for 175 years. In 1913, he was a special guest in St. Petersburg of Tsar Nicholas II of Russia at the three hundredth anniversary of the rise of the Romanov dynasty to power.

2018 Moscow–Constantinople schism Ongoing split between the Eastern Orthodox patriarchates of Moscow and Constantinople

The Moscow–Constantinople schism, also known as the Orthodox schism or Orthodox Church schism, is a schism which began on 15 October 2018 when the Russian Orthodox Church unilaterally severed full communion with the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople.

References

Preceded by
Benedict I
Greek Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem
19802000
Succeeded by
Irenaios I