Paul Bixler

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Paul Bixler
Biographical details
Born(1907-01-25)January 25, 1907
DiedNovember 18, 1985(1985-11-18) (aged 78)
Cleveland, Ohio
Playing career
1928 Mount Union
Position(s) Guard, fullback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1939–1941 Colgate (assistant)
1945 Ohio State (assistant)
1946 Ohio State
1947–1951 Colgate
Basketball
1936–1939 Akron
1939–1941 Colgate
Head coaching record
Overall18–30–4 (football)
52–27 (basketball)

Paul O. Bixler (January 25, 1907 – November 18, 1985) was an American football player, coach, and administrator and basketball coach. He served as the head football coach at Ohio State University for one season in 1946 and at Colgate University from 1947 to 1951, compiling a career record of 18–30–4. Bixler was also the head basketball coach at the University of Akron (1936–1939) and Colgate (1939–1941), tallying a mark of 52–27. He later served as director of player personnel for the Cleveland Browns of the National Football League (NFL).

American football Team field sport

American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada and also known as gridiron, is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, the team with possession of the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with the ball or passing it, while the defense, the team without possession of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs or plays; if they fail, they turn over the football to the defense, but if they succeed, they are given a new set of four downs to continue the drive. Points are scored primarily by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

Basketball Team sport

Basketball is a team sport in which two teams, most commonly of five players each, opposing one another on a rectangular court, compete with the primary objective of shooting a basketball through the defender's hoop while preventing the opposing team from shooting through their own hoop. A field goal is worth two points, unless made from behind the three-point line, when it is worth three. After a foul, timed play stops and the player fouled or designated to shoot a technical foul is given one or more one-point free throws. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins, but if regulation play expires with the score tied, an additional period of play (overtime) is mandated.

Ohio State University public research university in Columbus, Ohio, United States

The Ohio State University is a public research university in Columbus, Ohio. Founded in 1870 as a land-grant university and the ninth university in Ohio with the Morrill Act of 1862, the university was originally known as the Ohio Agricultural and Mechanical College. The college originally focused on various agricultural and mechanical disciplines but it developed into a comprehensive university under the direction of then-Governor Rutherford B. Hayes, and in 1878 the Ohio General Assembly passed a law changing the name to "The Ohio State University". The main campus in Columbus, Ohio, has since grown into the third-largest university campus in the United States. The university also operates regional campuses in Lima, Mansfield, Marion, Newark, and Wooster.

Contents

Bixler was a 1929 graduate of Mount Union College where he was a member of Phi Kappa Tau Fraternity and played guard and fullback on the football team. He started his coaching career in Canton, Ohio at Canton Central Junior High and then at Canton McKinley High School. He then became an assistant football coach at the University of Akron where he also served as head basketball coach.

Phi Kappa Tau North American collegiate fraternity

Phi Kappa Tau (ΦΚΤ), commonly known as Phi Tau, is a collegiate fraternity located in the United States. The fraternity was founded in 1906. As of February 2019, the fraternity has 161 Chartered Chapters, 83 active chapters, 9 colonies and around 4,500 collegiate members. SeriousFun Children's Network, founded by Beta Chapter alumnus Paul Newman, is Phi Kappa Tau's National Philanthropy. According to its Constitution, Phi Kappa Tau is one of the few social fraternities that can accept graduate students as well as undergraduates.

Canton, Ohio City in Ohio, United States

Canton is a city in and the county seat of Stark County, Ohio, United States. It is located approximately 60 miles (97 km) south of Cleveland and 20 miles (32 km) south of Akron in Northeast Ohio. The city lies on the edge of Ohio's extensive Amish country, particularly in Holmes and Wayne counties to the city's west and southwest. Canton is the largest municipality in the Canton-Massillon, OH Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Stark and Carroll counties. As of the 2010 Census, the population was 73,007, making Canton eighth among Ohio cities in population.

McKinley Senior High School is a public high school in Canton, Ohio, United States. It is the only high school in the Canton City School District and has two campuses: Downtown Campus, and the main campus which is known as McKinley Senior High School. Athletic teams compete as the Canton McKinley Bulldogs in the Ohio High School Athletic Association as a member of the Federal League.

Bixler was the 24th head football coach at Colgate University located in Hamilton, New York and he held that position for five seasons, from 1947 until 1951. His overall coaching record at Colgate was 14–27–2, ranking him tenth total wins and 26th in winning percentage in school history.

Colgate University private liberal arts college

Colgate University is a private liberal arts college in Hamilton, New York. Founded in 1819, Colgate enrolls nearly 3,000 students in 56 undergraduate majors that culminate in a Bachelor of Arts degree; it also enrolls a dozen students in a Master of Arts in Teaching program.

Hamilton (village), New York Village = in New York, United States

The Village of Hamilton is a village located within the town of Hamilton in Madison County, New York, United States. It is the location of Colgate University and has a population at 4,239 at the 2010 census. The 2017 movie Pottersville starring Michael Shannon and Judy Greer was filmed here.

Bixler died after suffering a heart attack in 1985. [1]

Head coaching record

Football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Ohio State Buckeyes (Big Ten Conference)(1946)
1946 Ohio State 4–3–22–3–1T–6th
Ohio State:4–3–22–3–1
Colgate Red Raiders (Independent)(1947–1951)
1947 Colgate 1–5–2
1948 Colgate3–6
1949 Colgate1–8
1950 Colgate5–3
1951 Colgate4–5
Colgate:14–27–2
Total:18–30–4

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References

  1. "Former Buckeye coach dies, was 77", Gettysburg Times, November 19, 1985, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania