Paul Davidson (economist)

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Paul Davidson
Born (1930-10-23) October 23, 1930 (age 90)
Nationality United States
Field Macroeconomics
School or
tradition
Post-Keynesian economics
Alma mater Brooklyn College (BS, 1950)
University of Pennsylvania (PhD, 1959)
City University of New York (MBA, 1955)
Influences John Maynard Keynes, Sidney Weintraub
ContributionsCo-founding editor of the Journal of Post Keynesian Economics
Information at IDEAS / RePEc

Paul Davidson (born October 23, 1930) is an American macroeconomist who has been one of the leading spokesmen of the American branch of the post-Keynesian school in economics. He is a prolific writer and has actively intervened in important debates on economic policy (natural resources, international monetary system, developing countries' debt) from a position that is very critical of mainstream economics.

Contents

Life and work

Davidson did not originally choose economics as a profession. His primary training was in both chemistry and biology, for which he received B.Sc. degrees from Brooklyn College in 1950. [1] He was a graduate student in biochemistry at the University of Pennsylvania, but switched to economics, receiving his MBA from the City University of New York in 1955, and completing his PhD at the University of Pennsylvania in 1959.

Davidson is Holly Professor of Excellence, Emeritus at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. He is a Visiting Scholar at the Schwartz Center For Economic Policy Analysis at the New School. Besides the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Tennessee, and the New School, Davidson has taught economics at Rutgers University, Bristol University, and the University of Cambridge. In the early 1960s he worked at Continental Oil Company. [1]

Davidson and Sidney Weintraub founded the Journal of Post Keynesian Economics in 1978. Davidson continues as editor of that journal. He is also a contributor to the Center for Full Employment and Stability. The CFEPS website (see Other Contributors: Paul Davidson Archived 2018-07-27 at the Wayback Machine ) contains more biographical information about him, as well as a list of his publications, with links to a few.

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References

  1. 1 2 "Paul Davidson". Center for Full Employment and Price Stability. Archived from the original on 2018-07-27. Retrieved 2011-04-03.

Major publications

Girón, Alicia (January 2009). "Review of John Maynard Keynes by Davidson, Paul (2007) in Great Thinkers in Economics Series, Palgrave, Macmillan, England". Ola Financiera (in Spanish). 2: 134–136. Pdf.