Paul Dean (baseball)

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Paul Dean
Daffy Dean 1940 Play Ball card.jpeg
Pitcher
Born:(1912-08-14)August 14, 1912
Lucas, Arkansas
Died: March 17, 1981(1981-03-17) (aged 68)
Springdale, Arkansas
Batted: RightThrew: Right
MLB debut
April 18, 1934, for the St. Louis Cardinals
Last MLB appearance
May 31, 1943, for the St. Louis Browns
MLB statistics
Win–loss record 50–34
Earned run average 3.72
Strikeouts 387
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Paul Dee Dean (August 14, 1912 March 17, 1981), nicknamed "Daffy", was an American Major League Baseball right-handed pitcher. Born in Lucas, Arkansas, he pitched for the St. Louis Cardinals (from 1934 to 1939), the New York Giants (from 1940 to 1941), and the St. Louis Browns (1943).

Contents

Dean played several years of baseball alongside his better-known brother, Jay. Because of his brother's nickname, "Dizzy", Dean also had a nickname, Daffy, but this did not reflect his personality as he was considered quiet and serious. The nickname was mainly a creation of the press. [1]

During his rookie season (at the age of 22), Dean pitched a no-hitter on September 21, 1934 in the second game of a doubleheader against the Brooklyn Dodgers. Dizzy (who had pitched a three-hit shutout in the first game) would say afterwards: "Shoot! If I'da known Paul was gonna pitch a no-hitter, I'da pitched me one too." Paul finished the year with a 19–11 record to help St. Louis win the National League pennant. Combined with his brother becoming the only NL pitcher in the live-ball era to win 30 games, the brothers bettered Dizzy's prediction that "me 'n' Paul are gonna win 45 games" by four wins. In the World Series, he and his brother won two games apiece, combining for a 4–1 record, 28 strikeouts and a 1.43 ERA, as the Cardinals took the series against the Detroit Tigers in seven games.

The following year, Dean won 19 games again. He got injured, however, and pitched ineffectively for the rest of his career.

Dean is featured prominently in some versions of Abbott & Costello's Who's on First comedy sketch. In the sketch Abbott is explaining to Costello that many ballplayers have unusual nicknames including Dizzy Dean, his brother Daffy Dean and their "French cousin Goo-fay Dean". The fictitious French cousin's name is goofy pronounced with an exaggerated French accent.

Dean served in the United States Army during World War II. [2] [3]

Dean died at age 68 in Springdale, Arkansas, from a heart attack. [3]

In the 1952 biographical film about Dizzy Dean, The Pride of St Louis, Paul was portrayed by actor Richard Crenna.

See also

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References

  1. "Ken Burns' Baseball Inning Five: Shadow Ball". Washington. PBS Video. 1994
  2. "Baseball in Wartime – Those Who Served A to Z". BaseballinWartime.com. Retrieved August 25, 2019.
  3. 1 2 Paul Dean at the SABR Baseball Biography Project , by Paul Geisler Jr., Retrieved August 25, 2019.

Achievements
Preceded by
Bobby Burke
No-hitter pitcher
September 21, 1934
Succeeded by
Vern Kennedy