Paul Gerard Smith

Last updated

Paul Gerard Smith
BornSeptember 14, 1894
Died4 April 1968 (1968-04-05) (aged 73)
OccupationScreenwriter
Years active1926–1955

Paul Gerard Smith (September 14, 1894 April 4, 1968) was an American screenwriter. He wrote for 90 films between 1926 and 1955.

Contents

Biography

Born in 1894, Smith started writing musical revues at the age of ten. He joined the Marines for World War I and while still in Germany wrote and directed the Sixth Marine Revue in the Rhine Occupation Area. He arrived back in the States in 1919 and started writing vaudeville acts. He became so successful that he was one of the few writers to be credited on the playbill. He scripted the Ziegfeld Follies of 1924, 1925, and 1926 and was also one of the writers of Funny Face .

Smith was brought to Hollywood by Buster Keaton to work on The General and Battling Butler . Early film credits include In Old Arizona , Mother Knows Best , and Dressed to Kill , as well as the first talkies of Harold Lloyd, Welcome Danger and Feet First . He wrote dozens of B movies for Universal Studios, Fox Film Corporation, Paramount Pictures, RKO Radio Pictures, Warner Bros., and Hal Roach Studios.

He also scripted USO shows and personal appearances for many film and radio stars entertaining overseas. After World War II he returned to film and radio scripting and also wrote and directed some early television programs on ABC, including The Gay Nineties Revue . He returned to stage writing with Hullabaloo for the Pasadena Playhouse.

Smith was married to Mary Alice Lundgren (October 1919 - April 1968) and had four children. His son, Paul Gerard Smith II, carried on the family tradition, working in the entertainment industry after serving in the Marines during World War II.

He was born in Omaha, Nebraska, and died in San Diego, California.

Partial filmography

Related Research Articles

John Michael Hayes American screenwriter

John Michael Hayes was an American screenwriter, who scripted four of Alfred Hitchcock's films in the 1950s.

Cliff Edwards American singer and actor

Clifton Avon "Cliff" Edwards, nicknamed "Ukulele Ike", was an American actor, musician and singer. He enjoyed considerable popularity in the 1920s and early 1930s, specializing in jazzy renditions of pop standards and novelty tunes. He had a number one hit with "Singin' in the Rain" in 1929. He also did voices for animated cartoons later in his career, and he is best known as the voice of Jiminy Cricket in Walt Disney's Pinocchio (1940) and Fun and Fancy Free (1947), and Dandy (Jim) Crow in Walt Disney's Dumbo (1941).

Kensico Cemetery Cemetery in New York, United States

Kensico Cemetery, located in Valhalla, Westchester County, New York was founded in 1889, when many New York City cemeteries were becoming full, and rural cemeteries were being created near the railroads that served the city. Initially 250 acres (1.0 km2), it was expanded to 600 acres (2.4 km²) in 1905, but reduced to 461 acres (1.9 km²) in 1912, when a portion was sold to the neighboring Gate of Heaven Cemetery.

Billy Rose

Billy Rose was an American impresario, theatrical showman and lyricist. For years both before and after World War II, Billy Rose was a major force in entertainment, with shows such as Billy Rose's Crazy Quilt (1931), Jumbo (1935), Billy Rose's Aquacade (1937), and Carmen Jones (1943). As a lyricist, he is credited with many songs, notably "Don't Bring Lulu" (1925), "Tonight You Belong To Me" (1926), "Me and My Shadow" (1927), "More Than You Know" (1929), "Without a Song" (1929), "It Happened in Monterrey" (1930) and "It's Only a Paper Moon" (1933).

Ralph Rainger American songwriter

Ralph Rainger was an American composer of popular music principally for films.

Lloyd Bacon Actor, director

Lloyd Francis Bacon was an American screen, stage and vaudeville actor and film director. As a director he made films in virtually all genres, including westerns, musicals, comedies, gangster films, and crime dramas. He was one of the directors at Warner Bros. in the 1930s who helped give that studio its reputation for gritty, fast-paced "torn from the headlines" action films. And, in directing Warner Bros.' 42nd Street, he joined the movie's song-and-dance-number director, Busby Berkeley, in contributing to "an instant and enduring classic [that] transformed the musical genre."

Michael Wilson was an American screenwriter who was blacklisted by the Hollywood film studios during the era of McCarthyism for being a communist.

Paul Jarrico was an American screenwriter and film producer who was blacklisted by the Hollywood movie studio bosses during the era of McCarthyism.

Mantan Moreland American actor (1902–1973)

Mantan Moreland was an American actor and comedian most popular in the 1930s and 1940s. He starred in numerous films. His daughter Marcella Moreland appeared as a child actress in several films.

Kenneth Webb American film director

Kenneth Seymour Webb was an American film director, screenwriter, and composer noted for directing a number of films in the early age of the American film industry. He helped write the Gay Divorce along with Samuel Hoffenstein.

George Stephenson "Onkus" Wallace, was an Australian comedian, vaudevillian, radio personality and film star. During the early to mid-20th century, he was one of the most famous and successful Australian comedians on both stage and screen, with screen, song and revue sketch writing amongst his repertoire. Wallace was a small tubby man with goggle eyes, a mobile face and croaky voice who appeared in trademark baggy trousers, checkered shirt and felt hat. His career as one of Australia's most popular comedians spanned four decades from the 1920s to 1960 and encompassed stage, radio and film entertainment. Ken G. Hall, who directed him in two films, wrote in his autobiography that George Wallace was the finest Australian comedian he had known.

Edmund Lowe American actor (1890–1971)

Edmund Dantes Lowe was an American actor. His formative experience began in vaudeville and silent film.

William Nigh American film director, writer, and actor

William Nigh was an American film director, writer, and actor. His film work sometimes lists him as either "Will Nigh" or "William Nye".

Joseph Kane American film director

Jasper Joseph Inman Kane was an American film director, film producer, film editor and screenwriter. He is best known for his extensive directorship and focus on Western films.

Russell Mack was an American vaudeville performer in the 1910s and a stage actor, film director, and producer in the 1920s and 1930s.

Hunt Stromberg American film director

Hunt Stromberg was a film producer during Hollywood's Golden Age. In a prolific 30-year career beginning in 1921, Stromberg produced, wrote, and directed some of Hollywood's most profitable and enduring films, including The Thin Man series, the Nelson Eddy/Jeanette MacDonald operettas, The Women, and The Great Ziegfeld, which won the Academy Award for Best Picture of 1936.

Edward T. Lowe Jr. American film writer, producer and editor

Edward T. Lowe Jr. was an American film writer, producer and editor. He wrote 120 films between years 1913–1947, produced 18 films and directed one: The Losing Game (1915).

Roland Pertwee British writer and actor

Roland Pertwee was an English playwright, film and television screenwriter, director and actor. He was the father of Doctor Who actor Jon Pertwee and fellow playwright and screenwriter Michael Pertwee. He was also the second cousin of actor Bill Pertwee and grandfather of actors Sean Pertwee and Dariel Pertwee.

Gordon Wong Wellesley was an Australian-born screenwriter and writer of Chinese descent. Born in Sydney in 1894 He wrote over thirty screenplays in the United States and Britain, often collaborating with the director Carol Reed. He began his career in Hollywood in the early 1930s and worked in Britain beginning about 1935. He was married to the scriptwriter Katherine Strueby. He was nominated for an Oscar for Best Writing, Original Story at the 1942 Oscars for Night Train to Munich, which was based on his novel, Report on a Fugitive.

Howard J. Green American screenwriter

Howard J. Green was an American screenwriter who worked in film and television. He was the first president of the Screen Writers Guild and a founder of the subsequent Writers Guild of America, West.