Paul Thoms

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Paul Slade Thoms (February 19, 1932 July 4, 2012) was a land surveyor and politician in Newfoundland. He represented Bonavista North from 1971 to 1975 in the Newfoundland House of Assembly. [1] [2]

Bonavista North

Bonavista North is a provincial electoral district for the House of Assembly of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. As of 2011 the district has 6,956 eligible voters.

The son of James Ernest Thoms and Gertrude Helen Bridger, [2] he was born in Garnish and was educated in Middle Brook. Thoms married Elsie Barrow. He served in the Royal Canadian Air Force from 1949 to 1954. Thoms was president of the Gambo Red Cross. [1] From 1967 to 1972, he owned and operated a farm in partnership with his brother Jim. [2]

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Thoms was ordained an Anglican deacon in 1991 and became a priest in 1992. He was also a member of the Orange Order in Newfoundland. [2]

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The Church of England is the established church of England. The Archbishop of Canterbury is the most senior cleric, although the monarch is the supreme governor. The Church of England is also the mother church of the international Anglican Communion. It traces its history to the Christian church recorded as existing in the Roman province of Britain by the third century, and to the 6th-century Gregorian mission to Kent led by Augustine of Canterbury.

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The Loyal Orange Institution, more commonly known as the Orange Order, is a Protestant fraternal order based primarily in Northern Ireland. It also has lodges in the Republic of Ireland, a Grand Orange Lodge in the Scottish Lowlands and other lodges throughout the Commonwealth, as well as in the United States and Togo. The Orange Order was founded in County Armagh in 1795, during a period of Protestant–Catholic sectarian conflict, as a Masonic-style fraternity sworn to maintain the Protestant Ascendancy. It is headed by the Grand Orange Lodge of Ireland, which was established in 1798. Its name is a tribute to the Dutch-born Protestant king William of Orange, who defeated the army of Catholic king James II in the Williamite–Jacobite War (1688–1691). Its members wear orange sashes and are referred to as Orangemen. The order is best known for its yearly marches, the biggest of which are held on or around 12 July.

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References

  1. 1 2 Normandin, P G (1974). Canadian Parliamentary Guide.
  2. 1 2 3 4 "Paul Slade Thoms". The Telegram.