Peñón of Algiers

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Peñón of Algiers (Spanish : Peñón de Argel) was a small islet off the coast of Algiers, fortified by the Kingdom of Spain during the 16th century. The islet was connected to the African continent to form a seawall and the harbour of Algiers.

History

In 1510 the Spaniards settled on a small island, the Peñón, north of Algiers (in modern Algeria). They forced Sālim al-Tūmī (Selim-bin-Teumi) to observe the terms of a treaty with Spain, namely, to accept a Spanish presence and to pay tribute. [1] [2] Fortifications were built on the islet, and a garrison of 200 men was established. [2] Sālim al-Tūmī had to go to Spain to take an oath of obedience to Ferdinand of Aragon. [2]

The islet was captured in 1529 by Hayreddin Barbarossa during the Capture of Algiers. Barbarossa dismantled the fortifications, ending the Spanish presence in the area.

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References

Coordinates: 36°46′N3°08′E / 36.767°N 3.133°E / 36.767; 3.133