Peacock Mausoleum

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Peacock Mausoleum
Peacock Family Memorial, Brookfield Unitarian Church, Gorton.jpg
TypeMausoleum
Location Gorton, Manchester
Coordinates 53°27′36″N2°10′08″W / 53.4601°N 2.1688°W / 53.4601; -2.1688 Coordinates: 53°27′36″N2°10′08″W / 53.4601°N 2.1688°W / 53.4601; -2.1688
BuiltC.1876
Architect Thomas Worthington
Architectural style(s) Victorian
Governing bodyChurch
Listed Building – Grade II*
Official name: Peacock Mausoleum
Designated3 October 1974
Reference no.388208
Greater Manchester UK relief location map.jpg
Red pog.svg
Location of Peacock Mausoleum in Greater Manchester

The Peacock Mausoleum is a Victorian Gothic memorial to Richard Peacock (1820–1889), engineer and Liberal MP for Manchester, and to his son, Joseph Peacock. It is situated in the cemetery of Brookfield Unitarian Church, Gorton, Manchester. [1] The mausoleum was designed by the prolific Manchester architect Thomas Worthington. It was listed Grade II* on the National Heritage List for England on 3 October 1974. [2]

Contents

Nikolaus Pevsner's The Buildings of England describes the memorial as "a large three-bay shrine of white stone. Steep roof and statues at the corners – an engineer, blacksmith, draughtsman and architect, supposedly a portrayal of Worthington himself." [1] Peacock, a partner in the locomotive engineering firm of Beyer, Peacock and Company also paid for the construction of the Brookfield Unitarian Church.

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner 2004, p. 374.
  2. Historic England, "Peacock Mausoleum to West of Brookfield Unitarian Church (1218905)", National Heritage List for England , retrieved 31 March 2020

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