Pedalling Ice Field

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Pedalling Ice Field ( 77°15′S159°55′E / 77.250°S 159.917°E / -77.250; 159.917 Coordinates: 77°15′S159°55′E / 77.250°S 159.917°E / -77.250; 159.917 ) is an icefield composed of blue ice, located at the edge of the polar plateau just south of Mount Dewitt and Mount Littlepage, close to the boundary between Oates Land and Victoria Land. The name alludes to the use of a bicycle as a practical means of transportation by a glacial mapping party led by Trevor Chinn, summer season 1992–93, and is part of a theme of cycling names in the area. Approved by New Zealand Geographic Board (NZGB) in 1995.

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Victoria Land Region of Antarctica

Victoria Land is a region in eastern Antarctica which fronts the western side of the Ross Sea and the Ross Ice Shelf, extending southward from about 70°30'S to 78°00'S, and westward from the Ross Sea to the edge of the Antarctic Plateau. It was discovered by Captain James Clark Ross in January 1841 and named after Queen Victoria. The rocky promontory of Minna Bluff is often regarded as the southernmost point of Victoria Land, and separates the Scott Coast to the north from the Hillary Coast of the Ross Dependency to the south.

Deep Freeze Range Mountain range in Antarctica

The Deep Freeze Range is a rugged mountain range, over 128 km (80 mi) long and about 16 km (10 mi) wide, rising between Priestley and Campbell glaciers in Victoria Land, Antarctica, and extending from the edge of the polar plateau to Terra Nova Bay. Peaks in the low and mid portions of the range were observed by early British expeditions to the Ross Sea.

Quartermain Mountains

The Quartermain Mountains are a group of exposed mountains in Antarctica, about 32 kilometres (20 mi) long, typical of ice-free features of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Victoria Land, located south of Taylor Glacier and bounded by Finger Mountain, Mount Handsley, Mount Feather and Tabular Mountain; also including Knobhead, Terra Cotta Mountain, New Mountain, Beacon Heights, Pyramid Mountain, Arena Valley, Kennar Valley, Turnabout Valley and the several valleys and ridges within Beacon Valley.

Sibelius Glacier is a glacier, 12 miles (19 km) long and 6 miles (10 km) wide, flowing south into the Mozart Ice Piedmont 10 miles (16 km) southwest of Mount Stephenson situated in the northern portion of Alexander Island, Antarctica. The glacier was first sighted from the air by the British Graham Land Expedition in 1937. Mapped from air photos taken by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition in 1947–48, by Searle of the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey in 1960. This feature was named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee for Jean Sibelius (1865-1957), Finnish composer.

Emmanuel Glacier

Emmanuel Glacier is a glacier in the Royal Society Range of Victoria Land, descending from Mount Lister northwestward between Table Mountain and Cathedral Rocks to enter Ferrar Glacier. It was named by the British Antarctic Expedition, 1910–13, after Emmanuel College, Cambridge, England.

Arthur Glacier

Arthur Glacier is a valley glacier in Antarctica. It is about 25 nautical miles (50 km) long, and flows west to Sulzberger Ice Shelf between the Swanson Mountains on the north and Mount Rea and Mount Cooper on the south, in the Ford Ranges of Marie Byrd Land. It was discovered by members of West Base of the United States Antarctic Service, in aerial flights and from ground surveys in November–December 1940. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Rear Admiral Arthur C. Davis, a leader in aviation in the U.S. Navy.

Brandwein Nunataks are a pair of nunataks, 870 metres (2,850 ft) high, which lie close together and mark the northeast extent of the Nebraska Peaks. They were named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names after S. (Sid) Brandwein, a member of the United States Antarctic Research Program geophysical field party, Ross Ice Shelf Project, 1973–74 field season.

Cerberus Glacier is a glacier, 1 nautical mile (2 km) long, fringing the south and east lower slopes of otherwise ice-free Mount Cerberus in the Olympus Range, Victoria Land. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names in 1997 in association with Mount Cerberus.

Orestes Valley is a small ice-free valley at the north side of Mount Orestes in the Olympus Range, Victoria Land in East Antarctica. It was named in 1964 by American geologist Parker E. Calkin for its association with Mount Orestes.

Mount Kuipers is an ice-free mountain, 1,940 metres (6,360 ft) high, between Mount Benninghoff and Knobhead in the Quartermain Mountains of Victoria Land, Antarctica. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names in 1992 after Ronald L. Kuipers, formerly of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). From 1968–80 he was associated with committees within the U.S. Government responsible for coordinating Antarctic policy; he initiated and collaborated in the authorship of the atlas of Polar Regions, CIA, 1978.

Knobhead is a massive ice-free mountain, 2,400 metres (7,900 ft) high, standing south of the western end of the Kukri Hills and overlooking Ferrar Glacier and Taylor Glacier at their point of apposition, in Victoria Land, Antarctica. It was discovered by the British National Antarctic Expedition (1901–04) and so named because of its appearance.

Murphy Rocks is a rock outcrops 12 nautical miles (22 km) southeast of Mount West on the broad ice-covered ridge between the Hammond and Boyd Glaciers, in the Ford Ranges of Marie Byrd Land. Mapped by United States Antarctic Service (USAS) (1939–41) and by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos (1959–65). Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Dion M. Murphy, aviation machinist's mate, U.S. Navy, a helicopter flight crewman during Operation Deep Freeze 1968.

Parker Mesa is a prominent snow-covered mesa 4 nautical miles (7 km) southeast of Skew Peak, in the south part of Clare Range, Victoria Land. This high, flattish feature was named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Bruce C. Parker, United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) biologist who conducted limnological studies at Antarctic Peninsula (1969–70) and in Victoria Land.

Parks Glacier is a glacier draining southeastward from Weiss Amphitheater, a caldera in southern Mount Sidley, in the Executive Committee Range, Marie Byrd Land. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) on the Executive Committee Range Traverse of 1959. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Perry E. Parks, Jr., exploration geophysicist and assistant seismologist on the Marie Byrd Land Traverse, 1959–60.

Handsley Valley is a small ice-free valley between Knobhead and Mount Handsley in the Quartermain Mountains of Victoria Land, Antarctica. It was named by the New Zealand Geographic Board in 1993 in association with Mount Handsley.

Schokalsky Bay

Schokalsky Bay is the easternmost bay of Alexander Island, Antarctica, 9 nautical miles (17 km) wide at its entrance and indenting 6 nautical miles (11 km) lying between Mount Calais and Cape Brown along the east coast of Alexander Island whilst adjacent to the George VI Ice Shelf in George VI Sound. Hampton Glacier discharges tremendous amounts of ice into the head of Schokalsky Bay at a steep gradient causing the ice there to be extremely broken and irregular, and discourages use of this bay and glacier as an inland sledging route onto northeast Alexander Island. The bay was first sighted from a distance in 1909 and roughly charted by the French Antarctic Expedition under Charcot who, thinking it to be a strait, gave the name "Detroit Schokalsky" after Yuliy M. Shokal'skiy, Russian geographer, meteorologist and oceanographer. Charcot followed the spelling Schokalsky used by the man himself when writing in Roman script. The coast in this vicinity was photographed from the air and this bay roughly charted in 1937 by the British Graham Land Expedition, but Charcot's "Detroit Schokalsky" was not identified. Surveys by Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey in 1948 identified this bay as the feature originally named by Charcot.

Spring Glacier is a glacier flowing from the northeast portion of Royal Society Range between Stoner Peak and Transit Ridge, joining the Blue Glacier drainage south of Granite Knolls, in Victoria Land. Named in 1992 by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) after Thomas E. Spring, civil engineer, United States Geological Survey (USGS); leader of the USGS two man astronomic surveying team to South Pole Station and Byrd Station in the 1969-70 field season. The team provided support to various science projects, established the position of the Geographic South Pole, and established a tie to the Byrd Ice Strain net which had been under study for several years.

Rickmers Glacier

Rickmers Glacier is a glacier flowing into Hugi Glacier just northwest of Ezerets Knoll, on the west coast of Graham Land. Photographed by Hunting Aerosurveys Ltd. in 1955–57, and mapped from these photos by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS). Named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1959 for W. Rickmer Rickmers, German pioneer exponent of skiing and joint author of the first English manual on skiing. He also improved the design of ice axes, introducing the characteristic shape still in use.

Rosanova Glacier

Rosanova Glacier is a glacier about 8 nautical miles long flowing north from King Peninsula into the Abbot Ice Shelf. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) after Christine E. Rosanova, United States Geological Survey (USGS), Flagstaff, AZ; specialist in the use of satellite imagery for geological and glaciological studies from the early 1990s to 2002; a pioneer in the use of imagery for glacier velocity measurements.

Lerchenfeld Glacier Glacier in Antarctica

Lerchenfeld Glacier is a glacier flowing in a west-northwesterly direction between Bertrab Nunatak and the Littlewood Nunataks in Antarctica. It coalesces with the southern flank of Schweitzer Glacier before the combined flow discharges into the head of Vahsel Bay. The glacier was discovered by the Second German Antarctic Expedition, 1911–12, under Wilhelm Filchner, who named this feature for Count Hugo von und zu Lerchenfeld-Köfering, a supporter of the expedition.

References

    PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document: "Pedalling Ice Field".(content from the Geographic Names Information System )  OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg