Pegasus Mountains

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Pegasus Mountains sunset Pegasus Mountains, Antarctica.jpg
Pegasus Mountains sunset

Pegasus Mountains ( 71°0′S67°12′W / 71.000°S 67.200°W / -71.000; -67.200 Coordinates: 71°0′S67°12′W / 71.000°S 67.200°W / -71.000; -67.200 ) is a mountain range, 16 nautical miles (30 km) long, consisting of a system of ridges and peaks broken by two passes. Located between Bertram and Ryder Glaciers and immediately east of Gurney Point on the west coast of Palmer Land, Antarctica. Named by United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) after the constellation of Pegasus.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Bertram Glacier is a glacier, 15 nautical miles (28 km) long and 18 nautical miles (33 km) wide at its mouth, which flows west from the Dyer Plateau of Palmer Land into George VI Sound between Wade Point and Gurney Point.

Ryder Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Ryder Glacier is a gently sloping glacier, 13 nautical miles (24 km) long and wide, flowing west from the Dyer Plateau of Palmer Land into George VI Sound to the south of Gurney Point. First surveyed in 1936 by the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) under Rymill. Named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1954 for Captain Robert E.D. Ryder, Royal Navy, who as Lieutenant, was commander of the Penola during the BGLE, 1934-37.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Pegasus Mountains" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey Scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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Palmer Land geographic region

Palmer Land is the portion of the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica that lies south of a line joining Cape Jeremy and Cape Agassiz. This application of Palmer Land is consistent with the 1964 agreement between US-ACAN and UK-APC, in which the name Antarctic Peninsula was approved for the major peninsula of Antarctica, and the names Graham Land and Palmer Land for the northern and southern portions, respectively. The line dividing them is roughly 69 degrees south.

Usarp Mountains

The Usarp Mountains is a major Antarctic mountain range, lying westward of the Rennick Glacier and trending N-S for about 190 kilometres (118 mi). The feature is bounded to the north by Pryor Glacier and the Wilson Hills. Its important constituent parts include Welcome Mountain, Mount Van der Hoeven, Mount Weihaupt, Mount Stuart, Mount Lorius, Smith Bench, Mount Roberts, Pomerantz Tableland, Daniels Range, Emlen Peaks, Helliwell Hills and Morozumi Range.

Prince Charles Mountains mountain range

The Prince Charles Mountains are a major group of mountains in Mac. Robertson Land in Antarctica, including the Athos Range, the Porthos Range, and the Aramis Range. The highest peak is Mount Menzies. Other prominent peaks are Mount Izabelle and Mount Stinear. These mountains together with other scattered peaks form an arc about 260 miles long, extending from the vicinity of Mount Starlight in the north to Goodspeed Nunataks in the south.

Mount Bagshawe is a southernmost and highest of the Batterbee Mountains, 2,200 m, standing 8 nautical miles (15 km) inland from George VI Sound on the west coast of Palmer Land. The mountain was first seen and photographed from the air on November 23, 1935 by Lincoln Ellsworth, and was mapped from these photographs by W.L.G. Joerg. It was surveyed in 1936 by British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) under Rymill. Named by United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1954 after Sir Arthur W.G. Bagshawe (1871–1950), British authority on tropical medicine, who raised a special fund to defray the expenses of biological equipment for BGLE, 1934-37.

Barcus Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Barcus Glacier is a glacier in the Hutton Mountains that drains east-southeast, to the north of Mount Nash and Mount Light, into Keller Inlet in Palmer Land. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from ground surveys and from U.S. Navy air photos, 1961–67, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for James R. Barcus, ionospheric physics researcher at Byrd Station in the summers of 1966–67 and 1967–68.

The Batterbee Mountains are a group of prominent mountains rising to 2,200 metres (7,200 ft), which forms part of the dissected edge of Dyer Plateau overlooking George VI Sound, on the west coast of Palmer Land. First seen and photographed from the air by Lincoln Ellsworth on November 23, 1935, they were charted from the ground in October 1936 by the British Graham Land Expedition under John Rymill, and named after Sir Harry Batterbee (1880–1976), Assistant Under-Secretary of State, Dominions Office, 1930–38, and Chairman of the Polar Committee in 1934, who gave help to the expedition.

Conchie Glacier is a glacier on the west coast of Palmer Land which flows southwest into George VI Sound between the Batterbee Mountains and the Steeple Peaks. It was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for Flight-Lieutenant Bertie J. Conchie, Royal Air Force, pilot with the British Antarctic Survey, 1969–75.

Mount Crooker is a gable-shaped mountain with much exposed rock, located on the north side of Ryder Glacier and at the south end of the Pegasus Mountains, in Palmer Land. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Allen R. Crooker, a United States Antarctic Research Program biologist at Palmer Station in 1972.

Gurney Point is a small rocky mass overlooking George VI Sound, rising to 610 metres (2,000 ft) and marking the western extremity of the rock ridge separating Bertram Glacier and Ryder Glacier on the west coast of Palmer Land, Antarctica. The point was first seen and photographed from the air on November 23, 1935, by Lincoln Ellsworth, and was mapped from these photographs by W.L.G. Joerg. It was surveyed in 1936 by the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) under John Rymill, and was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1954 for Norman A. Gurney, a member of the BGLE, 1934–37.

Posey Range is a mountain range in eastern Bowers Mountains, bounded by the Smithson, Graveson, Lillie and Champness Glaciers. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from ground surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960-62. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Julian W. Posey, meteorologist, who was scientific leader at South Pole Station, winter party 1959.

Mount Elder is a 940-metre (3,080 ft) mountain lying between Endurance Glacier and Mount Pendragon on Elephant Island, in the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica. It was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for Captain John P. Elder, Royal Engineers, surveyor of the U.K. Joint Services Expedition to Elephant Island in 1970–71.

Mount Meredith is a fairly massive, almost flat-topped mountain standing 10 nautical miles (19 km) north of Fisher Massif in the Prince Charles Mountains of Antarctica. It was photographed from Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions aircraft in 1956 and 1957, and was named by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia for Sergeant N. Meredith, RAAF, an engine fitter at Mawson Station in 1957.

The Manning Nunataks are a group of nunataks in the eastern side of the southern part of the Amery Ice Shelf, Antarctica, about 20 nautical miles (37 km) north-northeast of Pickering Nunatak. They were photographed from the air by Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions in 1957, and were named by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia for Sergeant A.S. Manning, Royal Australian Air Force, an airframe fitter at Mawson Station in 1958.

Mount Markab is a striking mountain in Antarctica, with a pointed peak which provides a notable landmark. It is located on the north side of the Pegasus Mountains, about 10 nautical miles (19 km) northeast of Gurney Point, on the west coast of Palmer Land. The mountain was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee after the star Markab in the constellation of Pegasus.

Saussure Glacier is a glacier flowing northeast from Tyndall Mountains, Arrowsmith Peninsula, into Lallemand Fjord, Loubet Coast. Photographed from the air by Falkland Islands and Dependencies Aerial Survey Expedition (FIDASE) in 1957. Named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in association with the names of glaciologists grouped in the area after Horace-Bénédict de Saussure (1740–99), Swiss naturalist and physicist, who in 1787 was the first to recognize that erratic boulders had been moved great distances by ice.

Sandau Nunatak is a coastal nunatak rising to about 400 m at the southwest end of Steeple Peaks, on the Rymill Coast, Palmer Land. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from U.S. Navy aerial photographs, 1966-69. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) in 1976 after Charles L. Sandau, U.S. Navy, cook with the winter party at Palmer Station, 1973.

Somero Glacier is a tributary glacier 7 nautical miles (13 km) long, flowing northwest from Mount Fairweather to enter Liv Glacier just south of the west end of the Duncan Mountains. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for George N. Somero, United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) biologist at McMurdo Station, 1963–64, and winter 1965.