Pele Island

Last updated
Pélé Island
Beach-in-Worearu-Village-on-Pele-Island-Vanuatu.jpg
Beach by Worearu Village with Nguna Island in the background.
Geography
Location Pacific Ocean
Archipelago Vanuatu
Area4.3 km2 (1.7 sq mi)
Highest elevation198 m (650 ft)
Administration
Vanuatu
Province Shefa Province
Demographics
Population220 (2015)
Ethnic groups Ni-Vanuatu
Map of Efate, Pele, Nguna, Kakula, and other islands in the region. Map of Efate Island EN.png
Map of Éfaté, Pélé, Nguna, Kakula, and other islands in the region.

Pélé Island, sometimes spelled Pele in English, [1] [2] is a volcanic island located 11,2 miles north of the island of Éfaté in the Shefa Province of the Republic of Vanuatu. [3] [4] [5] It has a total area of 1.7 square miles, [6] [7] Pélé is inhabited by about 200-220 Ni-Vanuatu villagers [8] [9] [10] residing in the four villages: Worsiviu, Worearu, Piliura, and Launamoa. [11] [12] Pélé Island is a part of the MPA Nguna-Pele Marine Protected Area, which was established in 2003, [13] [14] and is a popular Vanuatuan diving location. [15] The Nguna-Pele Marine Protected Area covers a total area of 11.5 sq. mi., including numerous reefs, sea grass beds, mangrove forests and intertidal lagoons. [16] The Nguna-Pele Marine Protection Agency is located in the village of Piliura, and mounts an exhibition and sells T-shirts. Income from tourism is distributed by the Village Tourism Committee and supports aims as village water supply projects. [17] The island can be visited daily by boat from the Paonangisu area by the town of Emua on Éfaté's north coast. [18] [19] There are also yachts available both from Emua and Nguna for day and overnight charters to the island. [20] The island is nearly adjacent to the island of Nguna, with a small passage no deeper than 33 yards separating the two. It has a tropical climate and has a maximum elevation of 650 feet at its highest. [21] Much of the island is extremely steep and rocks prevent you from walking along the coastline around the island. White sandy beaches are found in Piliura, Worearu, Laonamoa, and Sake. Overpopulation has led to a steady migration from Pele villages to southern Nguna in recent times. [22] [23]

Related Research Articles

Vanuatu Country in the southwestern Pacific

Vanuatu, officially the Republic of Vanuatu, is a Pacific island country located in the South Pacific Ocean. The archipelago, which is of volcanic origin, is 1,750 kilometres (1,090 mi) east of northern Australia, 540 kilometres (340 mi) northeast of New Caledonia, east of New Guinea, southeast of the Solomon Islands, and west of Fiji.

Efate Vanuatu island

Efate is an island in the Pacific Ocean which is part of the Shefa Province in Vanuatu. It is also known as Île Vate.

Marine protected area Protected areas of seas, oceans, estuaries or large lakes

Marine protected areas (MPA) are protected areas of seas, oceans, estuaries or in the US, the Great Lakes. These marine areas can come in many forms ranging from wildlife refuges to research facilities. MPAs restrict human activity for a conservation purpose, typically to protect natural or cultural resources. Such marine resources are protected by local, state, territorial, native, regional, national, or international authorities and differ substantially among and between nations. This variation includes different limitations on development, fishing practices, fishing seasons and catch limits, moorings and bans on removing or disrupting marine life. In some situations, MPAs also provide revenue for countries, potentially equal to the income that they would have if they were to grant companies permissions to fish.

Kapas Island island in Malaysia

Kapas Island is an island located about 6 kilometers east of Marang, Malaysia, with a smaller island, Pulau Gemia, located north of it. It measures roughly 1.5 by 2.5 km. Its name, Pulau Kapas, refers to the island's white beaches. The island has tropical jungle, clear seawater, white sand beaches and coral reefs in the surrounding waters. It is promoted as a "diving and snorkeling paradise". The island is reached by ferry from Marang. Kapas is the location where most of the research on the enigmatic Amphidromus snails is carried out.

Shefa Province province of Vanuatu

Shefa is one of the six provinces of Vanuatu, located in the center of the country and including the islands of Epi and Efate and the Shepherd Islands.

Mamanuca Islands

The Mamanuca Islands of Fiji are a volcanic archipelago lying to the west of Nadi and to the south of the Yasawa Islands. The group, a popular tourist destination, consists of about 20 islands, but about seven of these are covered by the Pacific Ocean at high tide.

Malakula island

Malakula Island, also spelled Malekula, is the second-largest island in the nation of Vanuatu, in the Pacific Ocean region of Melanesia.

Epi Island island

Epi is an island in Shefa Province, Vanuatu, at the north end of the Shepherd Islands.

Nguna Island in Shefa Province, Vanuatu

Nguna Island is an outer island off the north coast of Efate, Vanuatu in Undine Bay.

Coral reef protection Modifying human activities to reduce impact on coral reefs.

Coral reef protection is the process of modifying human activities to avoid damage to healthy coral reefs and to help damaged reefs recover. The key strategies used in reef protection include defining measurable goals and introducing active management and community involvement to reduce stressors that damage reef health. One management technique is to create Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) that directly limit human activities such as fishing.

Molokini island in the United States of America

Molokini is a crescent-shaped, partially submerged volcanic crater which forms a small, uninhabited islet located in ʻAlalākeiki Channel between the islands of Maui and Kahoʻolawe, within Maui County in Hawaiʻi. It is the remains of one of the seven Pleistocene epoch volcanoes that formed the prehistoric Maui Nui island, during the Quaternary Period of the Cenozoic Era.

Maskelyne Islands Archipelago in Malampa Province, Vanuatu

The Maskelyne Islands, often abbreviated as the Maskelynes, are a small chain of low islands that forms part of Vanuatu in the Pacific Ocean. Among the islands are Awei, Avock, Leumanang, Uluveo, and Vulai. Uluveo is the main island in the group and has three villages.

Fishing in Vanuatu

Fishing is important to the national economy of Vanuatu. It is the main source of income for many in the islands and Vanuatu's biggest export. According to 2009 figures, approximately 77% of households in Vanuatu are involved in fishing activity. According to 2005 figures, Vanuatu caught 151,080 fish in that year, with frozen fish accounted for half of Vanuatu's commodity exports.

Ramgoat Cay, United States Virgin Islands island in the United States Virgin Islands

Ramgoat Cay is an islet in the United States Virgin Islands, located 310 yards northeast of Henley Cay and 1300 feet north of Hawksnest Point on the island of Saint John. It is 30 feet high and located within the Virgin Islands National Park.

Tutuba Island Island in Sanma Province, Vanuatu

Tutuba is an island in Vanuatu, located off the coast of Vanuatu's largest island Espiritu Santo in Sanma Province.

Tula, American Samoa Village in American Samoa, United States

Tula is a village in the Eastern District of Tutuila Island in American Samoa. Tula is located in Vaifanua County and had a population of 413 as of the 2000 U.S. Census.

Arseo Island is a small uninhabited island in Malampa Province of Vanuatu in the Pacific Ocean. The estimated terrain elevation above the sea level is some 172 meters. There are two small neighboring islands: Leumanang and Varo.

Aghurubw

Aghurubw was a Carolinian (Refaluwasch) Chief and master navigator who led his people from Satawal to what is now Saipan in the early 19th century.

Maluu Place in Malaita Province, Solomon Islands

Malu'u is a village on the north coast of Malaita island in the Solomon Islands. The seat of the sub provincial area, it lies on Suafa Bay, within Malaita Province, along the road between Auki and Lau Lagoon.

References

  1. Michelle, Bennett (2003). Vanuatu: Dive into paradise. Lonely Planet. Page 80. ISBN   9781740592390.
  2. O’Byrne, Denis and David Harcombe (1999). Vanuatu: Volcanoes, beaches, reefs, land dives. Lonely Planet. Page 130. ISBN   9780864426604.
  3. http://vanuatu.travel/index.php/fr/70-things-to-do/cultural-and-community/469-sandy-beach-island-tour
  4. Carter, John (1984). Pacific Islands Year Book. Pacific Publications. Page 495. ISBN   9780858070554.
  5. Bevan, Stuart (1990). Vanuatu. Other People Publications. Page 131. ISBN   9780959062649.
  6. ftp://ftp.nodc.noaa.gov/pub/data.nodc/coris/library/NOAA/CRCP/project/1395/vanuatu_mpa_mgmt_plan_2006.pdf
  7. Wells, Sue and Charles R.C. Sheppard (1988). Coral Reefs of the World: Central and Western Pacific. UNEP. Page 311. ISBN   9782880329587.
  8. Michelle, Bennett (2003). Vanuatu: Dive into paradise. Lonely Planet. Page 80. ISBN   9781740592390.
  9. O’Byrne, Denis and David Harcombe (1999). Vanuatu: Volcanoes, beaches, reefs, land dives. Lonely Planet. Page 130. ISBN   9780864426604.
  10. Brillat, Michael (1999). South Pacific Islands. Hunter Publishing, Inc. Page 55. ISBN   9783886181049.
  11. Connell, John and Barbara Rugendyke (2008). Tourism at the Grassroots: Villagers and Visitors in the Asia-Pacific. Routledge. Page 5. ISBN   9781134135424.
  12. http://www.shefa.travel/pele--emau.html
  13. Ramutsindela, Maano and Marja Spierenburg (2013). Sponsoring Nature: Environmental Philanthropy for Conservation. Routledge. Page 147. ISBN   9781134040346.
  14. ftp://ftp.nodc.noaa.gov/pub/data.nodc/coris/library/NOAA/CRCP/project/1395/vanuatu_mpa_mgmt_plan_2006.pdf
  15. Jasons Travel Media Ltd. Vanuatu Visitor Guide. Jasons Travel Media. Page 58. ISBN   9780473171742.
  16. http://www.sprep.org/biodiversity-ecosystems-management/nguna-pele-does-vanuatu-proud
  17. Connell, John and Barbara Rugendyke (2008). Tourism at the Grassroots: Villagers and Visitors in the Asia-Pacific. Routledge. Page 5. ISBN   9781134135424.
  18. Stanley, David (2004). Moon Handbooks South Pacific. Avalon Travel. Page 922. ISBN   9781566914116.
  19. O’Byrne, Denis and David Harcombe (1999). Vanuatu: Volcanoes, beaches, reefs, land dives. Lonely Planet. Page 130. ISBN   9780864426604.
  20. Carroll, Tiffany (2011). The essential Vanuatu: culture, commerce, tourism, adventure. Media21 Publishing Pty Ltd. Page 13. ISBN   9781876624200.
  21. ftp://ftp.nodc.noaa.gov/pub/data.nodc/coris/library/NOAA/CRCP/project/1395/vanuatu_mpa_mgmt_plan_2006.pdf
  22. Michelle, Bennett (2003). Vanuatu: Dive into paradise. Lonely Planet. Page 80. ISBN   9781740592390.
  23. O’Byrne, Denis and David Harcombe (1999). Vanuatu: Volcanoes, beaches, reefs, land dives. Lonely Planet. Page 130. ISBN   9780864426604.

Coordinates: 17°29′35″S168°24′25″E / 17.49306°S 168.40694°E / -17.49306; 168.40694