Pennsylvania's at-large congressional district

Last updated
Pennsylvania's at-largeth congressional district
Obsolete district
Created1789
1793
1873
1883
1893
1913
1943
Eliminated1791
1795
1875
1889
1903
1923
1945
Years active1789–1791
1793–1795
1873–1875
1883–1889
1893–1903
1913–1923
1943–1945

The U.S. state of Pennsylvania elected its United States representatives at-large on a general ticket for the first and third United States Congresses. General ticket representation was prohibited by the 1842 Apportionment Bill and subsequent legislation, most recently in 1967 (Pub.L.   90–196, 2 U.S.C.   § 2c).

Contents

Some representatives, including Galusha A. Grow, served at-large after 1842 (in Grow's case, it was from 1894 to 1903). This was allowed because Pennsylvania had received an increase in the number of its representatives yet its legislature didn't pass an apportionment bill during those years.

List of representatives

1789–1795: Eight then thirteen seats

Representatives were elected statewide at-large on a general ticket.

CongressSeat ASeat BSeat CSeat DSeat ESeat FSeat GSeat HSeat ISeat JSeat KSeat LSeat M
1st
(1789–1791)
Thomas Fitzsimons.jpg
Thomas Fitzsimons
(Pro-Admin)

Elected in 1788.

Redistricted to the 1st district and re-elected.
Frederick Muhlenberg.jpg
Frederick Muhlenberg
(Pro-Admin)

Elected in 1788.

Redistricted to the 2nd district and re-elected.
Peter Muhlenberg2.jpg
Peter Muhlenberg
(Anti-Admin)

Elected in 1788.

Redistricted to the 3rd district and lost re-election.
3x4.svg
Daniel Hiester
(Anti-Admin)

Elected in 1788.

Redistricted to the 4th district and re-elected.
Henry Wynkoop.jpg
Henry Wynkoop
(Pro-Admin)

Elected in 1788.

Retired.
3x4.svg
Thomas Scott
(Pro-Admin)

Elected in 1788.

Retired.
Thomas Hartley 1748-1800.png
Thomas Hartley
(Pro-Admin)

Elected in 1788.

Redistricted to the 7th district and re-elected.
George Clymer.jpg
George Clymer
(Pro-Admin)

Elected in 1788.

Retired.
2nd
(1791–1793)
From 1791 to 1793, members were elected by districts.
3rd
(1793–1795)
In 1793, at-large representation was restored…… and five seats were added
Thomas Fitzsimons.jpg
Thomas Fitzsimons
(Pro-Admin)

Redistricted from the 1st district and re-elected in 1792.

Redistricted to the 1st district and lost re-election.
Frederick Muhlenberg.jpg
Frederick Muhlenberg
(Anti-Admin)

Redistricted from the 2nd district and re-elected in 1792.

Redistricted to the 2nd district and re-elected.
Peter Muhlenberg2.jpg
Peter Muhlenberg
(Anti-Admin)

Elected in 1792.

Redistricted to the 4th district and lost re-election.
3x4.svg
Daniel Hiester
(Anti-Admin)

Redistricted from the 4th district and re-elected in 1792.

Redistricted to the 5th district and re-elected.
3x4.svg
John W. Kittera
(Pro-Admin)

Redistricted from the 5th district and re-elected in 1792.

Redistricted to the 7th district and re-elected.
AndrewGregg.jpg
Andrew Gregg
(Anti-Admin)

Redistricted from the 6th district and re-elected in 1792.

Redistricted to the 9th district and re-elected.
Thomas Hartley 1748-1800.png
Thomas Hartley
(Pro-Admin)

Redistricted from the 7th district and re-elected in 1792.

Redistricted to the 8th district and re-elected.
William Findley.jpg
William Findley
(Anti-Admin)

Redistricted from the 8th district and re-elected in 1792.

Redistricted to the 11th district and re-elected.
3x4.svg
James Armstrong
(Pro-Admin)

Elected in 1792.

Retired.
General William Irvine 2.jpg
William Irvine
(Anti-Admin)

Elected in 1792.

Redistricted to the 9th district and lost re-election.
3x4.svg
Thomas Scott
(Pro-Admin)

Elected in 1792.

Redistricted to the 12th district and lost re-election.
3x4.svg
John Smilie
(Anti-Admin)

Elected in 1792.

Retired.
William Montgomery Danville, PA.jpg
William Montgomery
(Anti-Admin)

Elected in 1792.

Retired.

After 1795, most representatives were elected in districts. Occasionally, at-large representatives were also elected.

1873–1945

Cong
ress
YearsSeat ASeat BSeat CSeat D
RepresentativePartyElectoral historyRepresentativePartyElectoral historyRepresentativePartyElectoral historyRepresentativePartyElectoral history
43 March 4, 1873 –
March 4, 1875
Charles Albright congressman - Brady-Handy.jpg
Charles Albright
Republican Elected in 1872.

Retired.
Glenni William Scofield - Brady-Handy.jpg
Glenni W. Scofield
Republican Redistricted from the 19th district
and re-elected in 1872.

Retired.
Lemuel Todd Republican Elected in 1872.

Retired.
No fourth seat
44 March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1877
No at-large seats
45 March 4, 1877 –
March 43 1879
46 March 4, 1879 –
March 3, 1881
47 March 4, 1881 –
March 3, 1883
48 March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1885
Mortimer F. Elliott (Pennsylvania Congressman).jpg
Mortimer F. Elliott
Democratic Elected in 1882.

Lost re-election.
No second seatNo third seatNo fourth seat
49 March 4, 1885 –
March 3, 1887
Edwin S. Osborne (Pennsylvania Congressman).jpg
Edwin S. Osborne
Republican Elected in 1884.

Re-elected in 1886.

Redistricted to the 12th district .
50 March 4, 1887 –
March 3, 1889
51 March 4, 1889 –
March 3, 1891
No at-large seats
52 March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1893
53 March 4, 1893 –
December 1, 1893
Alexander McDowell.jpg
Alexander McDowell
Republican Elected in 1892.

Retired.
William Lilly (Pennsylvania Congressman).jpg
William Lilly
Republican Elected in 1892

Died.
No third seatNo fourth seat
December 1, 1893 –
February 26, 1894
Vacant
February 26, 1894 –
March 3, 1895
Galusha A. Grow restored.jpg
Galusha Grow
Republican Elected to fill Lilly's vacancy.

Elected to full term in 1894.

Re-elected in 1896.

Re-elected in 1898.

Re-elected in 1900.

Retired.
54 March 4, 1895 –
March 3, 1897
George Franklin Huff.jpg
George F. Huff
Republican Elected in 1894.

Retired.
55 March 4, 1897 –
March 3, 1899
Samuel A. Davenport (Pennsylvania Congressman).jpg
Samuel A. Davenport
Republican Elected in 1896.

Re-elected in 1898.

Retired.
56 March 4, 1899 –
March 3, 1901
57 March 4, 1901 –
March 3, 1903
Robert H. Foerderer (Pennsylvania Congressman).jpg
Robert H. Foerderer
Republican Elected in 1900.

Redistricted to the 4th district.
58 March 4, 1903 –
March 3, 1905
No at-large seats
59 March 4, 1905 –
March 3, 1907
60 March 4, 1907 –
March 3, 1909
61 March 4, 1909 –
March 3, 1911
62 March 4, 1911 –
March 3, 1913
63 March 4, 1913 –
March 3, 1915
Fred E. Lewis (Pennsylvania Congressman).jpg
Fred E. Lewis
Republican Elected in 1912.

[ data unknown/missing ].
JohnMMorin.jpg
John M. Morin
Republican Elected in 1912.

Redistricted to the 31st district .
Anderson H. Walters, Pa. LOC npcc.04285.tif
Anderson H. Walters
Republican Elected in 1912.

Retired.
ArthurRingwaltRupley.jpg
Arthur R. Rupley
Republican Elected in 1912.

[ data unknown/missing ].
64 March 4, 1915 –
March 3, 1917
John R. K. Scott (Pennsylvania Congressman).jpg
John R.K. Scott
Republican Elected in 1914.

Re-elected in 1916.

Resigned.
ThomasSCrago.jpg
Thomas S. Crago
Republican Elected in 1914.

Re-elected in 1916.

Re-elected in 1918.

Retired.
Daniel Lafean (Pennsylvania Congressman).jpg
Daniel F. Lafean
Republican Elected in 1914.

Retired.
Mahlon Morris Garland.jpg
Mahlon M. Garland
Republican Elected in 1914.

Re-elected in 1916.

Re-elected in 1918.

Died.
65 March 4, 1917 –
January 5, 1919
Joseph McLaughlin (June 9, 1867 - November 21, 1926) circa 1915.jpg
Joseph McLaughlin
Republican Elected in 1916.

Lost renomination.
January 6, 1919 –
March 3, 1919
Vacant
66 March 4, 1919 –
November 19, 1920
WilliamJosephBurke.jpg
William J. Burke
Republican Elected in 1918.

Re-elected in 1920.

Lost re-election.
Anderson H. Walters, Pa. LOC npcc.04285.tif
Anderson H. Walters
Republican Elected in 1918.

Re-elected in 1920.

Retired.
November 20, 1920 –
March 3, 1921
Vacant
67 March 4, 1921 –
September 20, 1921
Joseph McLaughlin (June 9, 1867 - November 21, 1926) circa 1915.jpg
Joseph McLaughlin
Republican Elected in 1920.

Retired.
September 20, 1921 –
March 3, 1923
ThomasSCrago.jpg
Thomas S. Crago
Republican Elected to finish Garland's term in 1921.

Retired.
68 March 4, 1923 –
March 3, 1925
No at-large seats
69 March 4, 1925 –
March 4, 1927
70 March 4, 1927 –
March 3, 1929
71 March 4, 1929 –
March 3, 1931
72 March 4, 1931 –
March 3, 1933
73 March 4, 1933 –
January 3, 1935
74 January 3, 1935 –
January 3, 1937
75 January 3, 1937 –
January 3, 1939
76 January 3, 1939 –
January 3, 1941
77 January 3, 1941 –
January 3, 1943
78 January 3, 1943 –
January 2, 1945
WilliamITroutman.jpg
William I. Troutman
Republican Elected in 1942.

Resigned.
No second seatNo third seatNo fourth seat
January 2, 1945 –
January 3, 1945
Vacant

No at-large representatives were apportioned after the 78th Congress.

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References

Coordinates: 41°00′N77°30′W / 41.000°N 77.500°W / 41.000; -77.500