Pennsylvania Route 313

Last updated

PA-313.svg

Pennsylvania Route 313
Pennsylvania Route 313 map.png
Route information
Maintained by PennDOT
Length18.021 mi [1] (29.002 km)
Existed1928–present
Major junctions
West endPA-309.svgPA-663.svg PA 309 / PA 663 in Quakertown
 PA-212.svg PA 212 in Quakertown
PA-563.svg PA 563 in East Rockhill Township
PA-113.svg PA 113 in Kulps Corner
PA-611.svg PA 611 in Doylestown
US 202.svg US 202 in Doylestown
East endPA-263.svg PA 263 in Furlong
Location
Counties Bucks
Highway system
PA-312 (1926).svg PA 312 PA 314 PA-314.svg

Pennsylvania Route 313 (PA 313) is a mostly 2-lane, 18-mile-long (29 km) state highway entirely within Bucks County, Pennsylvania. The western end of PA 313 is at an intersection with PA 309 and PA 663 in Quakertown. The eastern end is at an intersection with PA 263 in the Doylestown Township community of Furlong. PA 313 is signed an eastwest road, although it runs almost purely northwestsoutheast through most of its course. It is a major arterial road in central and northern Bucks County as it connects several communities including Quakertown, Dublin, and Doylestown.

Contents

The predecessors to present-day PA 313 were the Swamp Road, constructed in 1737, and the Dublin Pike, built in 1876. The route between Kulps Corner and Doylestown was originally designated as part of PA 113 by 1927, with a portion in Quakertown designated as PA 212 by the same time. PA 313 was designated by 1930 to run from PA 212 in Quakertown southeast to PA 113 and PA 413 in Kulps Corner. The roadway was finished during the 1930s. PA 313 was extended southeast to U.S. Route 611 (US 611) at Main Street in Doylestown in 1946, replacing a part of PA 113. PA 313 was realigned to end at US 202 east of Doylestown by 1950. In the 1970s, PA 313 was extended west to run concurrent with PA 212 to its current western terminus; the concurrent PA 212 designation was dropped by the 1990s. The route was extended to its current eastern terminus by 1980.

Route description

PA 313 westbound through Quakertown, less than a mile from the western terminus at PA 309 and PA 663 SR 0313 westbound through Quakertown.jpg
PA 313 westbound through Quakertown, less than a mile from the western terminus at PA 309 and PA 663

PA 313 begins at an intersection with PA 309 and the northern terminus of PA 663 in the borough of Quakertown in Bucks County. Past the western terminus, the roadway continues as PA 663. From this intersection, PA 313 heads east on two-lane undivided West Broad Street, passing a mix of homes and businesses before continuing into residential areas past the Main Street intersection. The route enters the commercial downtown of Quakertown, where it splits into a one-way pair with two lanes in each direction. PA 313 turns into a two-way, two-lane road again and crosses the Bethlehem Line railroad line that is owned by SEPTA and operated by the East Penn Railroad at-grade, becoming East Broad Street and coming to an intersection with the western terminus of PA 212. Following this intersection, the road passes homes, turning to the southeast and crossing Beaver Run. PA 313 continues near more residences with some businesses, making a turn to the east and leaving Quakertown for Richland Township. Here, the route becomes Doylestown Pike and heads southeast through areas of fields and woods with some homes, crossing Morgan Creek. The road heads into more forested areas and enters East Rockhill Township at the Rockhill Road intersection, where the name changes to Dublin Pike. PA 313 comes to an intersection with PA 563, which heads northeast to Nockamixon State Park, at which point PA 563 joins PA 313 in a concurrency. The road passes to the southwest of the state park and continues through a mix of farm fields and woods with occasional residences, crossing Threemile Run. PA 563 splits from PA 313 by heading southwest on Ridge Road. [2] [3]

Past this intersection, PA 313 continues southeast, passing through more rural areas. At the Old Bethlehem Road intersection, the route becomes the border between Bedminster Township to the northeast and Hilltown Township to the southwest, crossing the East Branch Perkiomen Creek and running through agricultural areas with some woods and homes. The road comes to a junction with PA 113 in Kulps Corner, at which point there are a few businesses. PA 313 heads into the borough of Dublin at the Rickert Road intersection and becomes Main Street, where it passes homes and businesses. The route runs past more residences before it leaves Dublin and forms the border between Bedminster Township and Hilltown Township again, with the name changing back to Dublin Pike. The road heads into rural areas with some development and becomes the border between Plumstead Township to the northeast and Hilltown Township to the southwest at the Applebutter Road intersection, at which point the name changes to Swamp Road. At the intersection with Stump Road/Upper Stump Road, PA 313 becomes the line between Plumstead Township to the northeast and New Britain Township to the southwest, continuing through farmland with some woods and homes. The route passes to the northeast of Peace Valley Park, with access to the park provided by New Galena Road, and crosses the North Branch Neshaminy Creek before it comes to an intersection with Ferry Road in the community of Fountainville; Ferry Road also provides access to Peace Valley Park. [2] [3]

PA 313 westbound past PA 611 in Doylestown PA 313 WB shield past PA 611.jpeg
PA 313 westbound past PA 611 in Doylestown

At this point, the road becomes the border between Plumstead Township to the northeast and Doylestown Township to the southwest, heading past residential subdivisions and crossing Pine Run. PA 313 heads into commercial areas and widens into a four-lane divided highway as it comes to a partial interchange with the PA 611 freeway bypass of the borough of Doylestown, with access to southbound PA 611 and from northbound PA 611. The route passes more businesses as a five-lane road with a center left-turn lane, becoming the border between Buckingham Township to the northeast and Doylestown Township to the southwest before crossing North Easton Road/North Main Street. Past the Old Easton Road intersection a short distance later, the road narrows to two lanes and runs along the line between Buckingham Township to the northeast and Doylestown to the southwest, passing homes and businesses before running between farm fields to the northeast and Fonthill County Park to the southwest, which contains the Fonthill Museum and the Moravian Pottery and Tile Works. PA 313 fully enters Doylestown at the Court Street intersection and passes through residential areas. The route becomes the border between Buckingham Township and Doylestown again as it runs near more homes and reaches an intersection with US 202. Following this intersection, PA 313 runs along the border between Buckingham Township to the northeast and Doylestown Township to the southwest, passing through a mix of woods and residential subdivisions before it reaches its eastern terminus at an intersection with PA 263 (York Road) in the community of Furlong. Past this intersection, Swamp Road continues southeast along unsigned quadrant routes toward the borough of Newtown. [2] [3]

History

Swamp Road dates back to 1737, when the Newtown Road was constructed and connected Newtown with Quakertown and Milford Township. [4] The Dublin Pike was constructed in 1876. [5] When Pennsylvania first legislated routes in 1911, what is now PA 313 from northwest of Dublin to Doylestown was legislated as part of Legislative Route 154. [6] By 1927, PA 212 was designated on the westernmost part of current PA 313 between US 309 (now PA 309) and Hellertown Avenue in Quakertown and PA 113 was designated along the part of present-day PA 313 between Kulps Corner and Doylestown. PA 113 split from Swamp Road and followed present-day Old Dublin Pike to US 611 (Main Street) in Doylestown, where it turned south for a concurrency. [7] PA 313 was designated by 1930 to run from PA 212 at Hellertown Avenue in Quakertown southeast to PA 113 and PA 413 in Kulps Corner. At this time, the route southeast of Quakertown was under construction. [8] The portion of PA 313 between Quakertown and Kulps Corner was completed during the 1930s. [9] PA 313 was extended southeast to US 611 (Main Street) and Old Dublin Pike in Doylestown in 1946, replacing the portion of PA 113 between Kulps Corner and Doylestown. [10] By 1950, PA 313 was realigned to follow Swamp Road southeast to end at US 202 east of Doylestown, leaving the section of Old Dublin Pike heading into Doylestown unnumbered. [11] PA 313 was extended west to run concurrent with PA 212 through Quakertown to end at its current western terminus with PA 309 and PA 663 by 1971. [12] By 1980, PA 313 was extended southeast to end at its present location at PA 263. [13] By 1991, the concurrency with PA 212 through Quakertown was removed. [14]

Major intersections

The entire route is in Bucks County.

Locationmi [1] kmDestinationsNotes
Quakertown 0.0000.000PA-309.svg PA 309 (West End Boulevard) Sellersville, Allentown
PA-663.svg PA 663 south (West Broad Street) Pennsburg
Northern terminus of PA 663; western terminus of PA 313
1.3662.198PA-212.svg PA 212 east (Hellertown Avenue)Western terminus of PA 212
East Rockhill Township 4.7847.699PA-563.svg PA 563 north (Mountain View Drive) Nockamixon State Park Western terminus of concurrency
6.0379.716PA-563.svg PA 563 south (Ridge Road) Perkasie Eastern terminus of concurrency
HilltownBedminster
township line
8.83014.211PA-113.svg PA 113 (Souderton Road/Bedminster Road)
DoylestownPlumstead
township line
14.48623.313PA-611.svg PA 611 south (Doylestown Bypass) Warrington Interchange; access to southbound PA 611 and from northbound PA 611; access to northbound PA 611 and from southbound PA 611 provided by North Easton Road
DoylestownDoylestown Township
Buckingham Township tripoint
16.50126.556US 202.svg US 202 (Buckingham Pike) Buckingham, Doylestown
DoylestownBuckingham
township line
18.02129.002PA-263.svg PA 263 (York Road) Buckingham, Hatboro Eastern terminus of PA 313
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Special routes

Current

PA 313 Truck

Truck plate.svg

PA-313.svg

Pennsylvania Route 313 Truck
Location Quakertown, Pennsylvania
Length0.50 mi [15] (0.80 km)

Pennsylvania Route 313 Truck signs are posted to direct trucks from westbound PA 212 to PA 313 in Quakertown, avoiding the intersection between PA 212 and PA 313. From PA 212, the route runs west on Mill Street and south on 4th Street to PA 313. [15]

Former

PA 313 Alternate Truck

Alternate plate.svg
Truck plate.svg
PA-313.svg

PA Route 313 Alternate Truck
Location Bucks County, Pennsylvania
Existed2013–2015

Pennsylvania Route 313 Alternate Truck was a truck route around a weight-restricted bridge over Beaver Run in Quakertown, on which trucks over 36 tons and combination loads over 40 tons were prohibited. The route followed PA 309, Lawn Avenue, and PA 563. It was signed in 2013, but the bridge was repaired, thus decommissioning PA 313 Alt. Truck in 2015. [16] [17]

See also

Related Research Articles

Pennsylvania Route 309 State highway in Pennsylvania, United States

Pennsylvania Route 309 is a state highway which runs for 134 miles (216 km) through Pennsylvania in the United States. The route runs from the interchange between PA 611 and Cheltenham Avenue on the border of Philadelphia and Cheltenham Township north to an intersection with PA 29 in Bowman Creek, a village in Monroe Township in Wyoming County. It connects Philadelphia and its northern suburbs to Allentown, Hazleton, and Wilkes-Barre. PA 309 heads north from Philadelphia and becomes a freeway called the Fort Washington Expressway through suburban areas in Montgomery County, passing through Fort Washington, before becoming a surface road called Bethlehem Pike and running through Montgomeryville. In Bucks County, the route has a freeway section bypassing Sellersville before passing through Quakertown as a surface road. PA 309 heads into the Lehigh Valley and joins Interstate 78 (I-78) on a freeway bypassing Allentown before splitting to the north and running through rural areas as a surface road. The route continues north into the Coal Region and passes through Tamaqua before it reaches Hazleton. PA 309 heads into the Wyoming Valley and passes through the Wilkes-Barre area on a freeway alignment along I-81 and the North Cross Valley Expressway before turning into a surface road again and running through Dallas before reaching its northern terminus.

Pennsylvania Route 132 Highway in Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania Route 132 (PA 132) is a state highway in southeast Pennsylvania. The route runs northwest to southeast through Bucks County in suburban Philadelphia from PA 611 in Warrington southeast to Interstate 95 (I-95) in Bensalem. PA 132 is a commercial route lined with shopping centers throughout much of its 15-mile (24 km) length. It is named Street Road and is five lanes wide for much of its length. The route was also designated as the Armed Forces and Veterans Memorial Highway in 2005. From west to east, PA 132 crosses PA 263 and PA 332 in Warminster; PA 232 in Southampton; PA 532 in Feasterville; and U.S. Route 1 (US 1), the Pennsylvania Turnpike (I-276), PA 513, and US 13 in Bensalem. Street Road was included in William Penn's survey plans and completed by 1737. The road was paved by 1911 and received the PA 132 designation by 1927. The route was widened into a multi-lane highway and extended to I-95 by 1970. An E-ZPass-only interchange with the eastbound direction of the Pennsylvania Turnpike opened in 2010.

Pennsylvania Route 611 State highway in Pennsylvania, United States

Pennsylvania Route 611 is a state highway in Pennsylvania, United States, running 109.7 mi (176.5 km) from Interstate 95 (I-95) in the southern part of the city of Philadelphia north to I-380 in Coolbaugh Township in the Pocono Mountains. Within Philadelphia, PA 611 follows Broad Street, the main north-south street in Philadelphia, through most of the city. The route continues north through the northern suburbs of Philadelphia and serves Jenkintown, Willow Grove, and Doylestown, the latter of which it bypasses on a freeway. North of Doylestown, PA 611 heads through rural areas and runs along the west bank of the Delaware River to the city of Easton in the Lehigh Valley. The route continues back into rural land and passes through the Delaware Water Gap, at which point it enters the Pocono Mountains region. Here, PA 611 heads northwest through Stroudsburg and Mount Pocono toward its northern terminus.

Pennsylvania Route 32

Pennsylvania Route 32 is a scenic two-lane highway that runs along the west side of the Delaware River in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. It begins at U.S. Route 1 in Falls Township outside of Morrisville and ends at PA 611 in the village of Kintnersville in Nockamixon Township. PA 32 passes through Washington Crossing Historic Park, a Revolutionary War-themed historical park on the site of George Washington's crossing on the night of December 25–26, 1776. It also passes through the boroughs of Morrisville, Yardley, and New Hope.

Pennsylvania Route 663 Highway in Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania Route 663 is a 22.13-mile-long (35.61 km) state highway in Montgomery and Bucks counties in southeast Pennsylvania. Its southern terminus is at PA 100 in Pottstown and its northern terminus is at PA 309 and PA 313 in Quakertown, where the road continues eastward as PA 313. Along the way, PA 663 also passes through the borough of Pennsburg. It is called John Fries Highway between Pennsburg and Quakertown. It has an interchange with Interstate 476 at exit 44 west of Quakertown. The route was assigned in 1930, and it has had several realignments since its commissioning, including two major ones.

Pennsylvania Route 263

Pennsylvania Route 263 (PA 263) is a north–south state highway located in southeast Pennsylvania. The southern terminus of the route is at PA 611 in Willow Grove, Montgomery County. The northern terminus is at the Centre Bridge–Stockton Bridge over the Delaware River in Centre Bridge, Bucks County, where the road continues into Stockton, New Jersey as Bridge Street to an intersection with Route 29. PA 263 follows the routing of Old York Road, a historic road that connected Philadelphia to New York City, and carries the name York Road from the southern terminus to Lahaska and Upper York Road north of there. From Willow Grove to Buckingham, PA 263 runs mostly through suburban areas as a four-lane road, passing through Hatboro, Warminster, and Jamison. The route forms a concurrency with U.S. Route 202 (US 202) and narrows to a two-lane road, splitting with that route in Lahaska. From here, the route continues through rural areas to Centre Bridge.

Pennsylvania Route 63

Pennsylvania Route 63 (PA 63) is a 37.4-mile-long (60.2 km) state highway located in the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania area. The western terminus of the route is at PA 29 in Green Lane, Montgomery County. The eastern terminus is at Interstate 95 (I-95) in Bensalem Township, Bucks County. The route heads through a mix of suburban and rural areas of northern Montgomery County as a two-lane road, passing through Harleysville, before coming to an interchange with I-476 in Towamencin Township. From this point, PA 63 continues through predominantly suburban areas of eastern Montgomery County as a two- to four-lane road, passing through Lansdale, Maple Glen, Willow Grove, and Huntingdon Valley. Upon entering Northeast Philadelphia, the route follows Red Lion Road and U.S. Route 1 (US 1) before heading southeast on a freeway called Woodhaven Road to I-95.

Pennsylvania Route 232

Pennsylvania Route 232 is a 25.2-mile-long (40.6 km) state highway located in southeastern Pennsylvania. The southern terminus of the route is at U.S. Route 1 and US 13 at the Oxford Circle in Philadelphia. The northern terminus is at PA 32 in the borough of New Hope, Bucks County, on the banks of the Delaware River. The route passes through the urban areas of Northeast Philadelphia as two-lane undivided Oxford Avenue, serving the Lawncrest, Burholme, and Fox Chase neighborhoods. Upon entering Montgomery County, PA 232 becomes a two- to four-lane road called Huntingdon Pike that passes through suburban areas, serving the communities of Rockledge, Huntingdon Valley, and Bryn Athyn. The route passes through more suburban development in Bucks County as Second Street Pike, running through Southampton and Richboro. In Wrightstown Township, PA 232 enters rural areas and becomes Windy Bush Road as it heads north to New Hope.

Pennsylvania Route 73 Highway in Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania Route 73 (PA 73) is a 62.32-mile (100.29 km) long east–west state highway in southeastern Pennsylvania. It runs from PA 61 in Leesport southeast to the New Jersey state line on the Tacony–Palmyra Bridge over the Delaware River in Philadelphia, where the road continues as New Jersey Route 73. The route passes through rural areas of Berks County, crossing U.S. Route 222 (US 222) in Maiden Creek before heading southeast through Oley and Boyertown. PA 73 continues into Montgomery County and intersects PA 100 in Gilbertsville and PA 29 in Schwenksville before it heads into the northwest suburbs of Philadelphia. The route passes through Skippack and intersects US 202 in Center Square, PA 309 in Springfield Township, and PA 611 near Jenkintown. PA 73 continues through Northeast Philadelphia on Cottman Avenue, crossing US 1 and US 13 before coming to an interchange with Interstate 95 (I-95) near the Tacony–Palmyra Bridge.

Pennsylvania Route 113 Highway in Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania Route 113 is a 46.9-mile-long (75.5 km) state route in eastern Pennsylvania. The southern terminus of the route is at U.S. Route 30 Business in Downingtown. Its northern terminus is at PA 611 in Tinicum Township. The route is signed as north–south although its exact alignment follows a northeast-southwest routing. The route serves Chester, Montgomery, and Bucks counties, passing through Lionville, Phoenixville, Trappe, Skippack, Harleysville, Souderton, and Silverdale along the way.

Pennsylvania Route 463

Pennsylvania Route 463 (PA 463) is a 12.9-mile-long (20.8 km) state highway completely in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. Its western terminus is at PA 63 in Hatfield Township and its eastern terminus is at PA 611 in Horsham. It runs through the northern suburbs of Philadelphia and passes through the towns of Hatfield, Montgomeryville, and Horsham. The route intersects PA 309, U.S. Route 202 Business, and US 202 in Montgomeryville and PA 152 in Prospectville. Through its length, the route carries the names Forty Foot Road, Broad Street, Main Street, Cowpath Road, and Horsham Road. PA 463 was designated in 1928 and fully paved by 1940. In 2010, a portion of the route in Montgomery Township was widened.

Pennsylvania Route 152 Highway in Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania Route 152 (PA 152) is a 25.3-mile-long (40.7 km) state highway located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. The route travels north–south from an interchange with PA 309 located in the Cedarbrook neighborhood of Cheltenham Township in Montgomery County north to another interchange with PA 309 located northeast of Telford in Bucks County. PA 152 is known as Limekiln Pike for most of its length. From the southern terminus, the route passes through suburban areas to the north of Philadelphia, serving Dresher, Maple Glen, and Chalfont. North of Chalfont, PA 152 runs through rural suburbs of Philadelphia before reaching Silverdale. Past here, the road continues northwest through Perkasie, where it turns southwest and passes through Sellersville before reaching its northern terminus.

Pennsylvania Route 413

Pennsylvania Route 413 is a 31-mile-long (50 km), north–south state highway in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. The route runs from the New Jersey state line on the Burlington–Bristol Bridge over the Delaware River outside Bristol, where the road continues as Route 413 into New Jersey, north to PA 611 in Bedminster Township. The route passes through the lower and central portions of Bucks County, serving Bristol, Levittown, Langhorne, Newtown, and Buckingham. The route intersects U.S. Route 13 and Interstate 95 (I-95) near Bristol, I-295 near Penndel, US 1 in Langhorne Manor, and US 202 in Buckingham.

Pennsylvania Route 563

Pennsylvania Route 563 (PA 563) is a state highway in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. The route runs 21.1 mi (33.96 km) from PA 63 in Upper Salford Township northeast to PA 412 in Nockamixon Township. The road runs through mostly rural areas in the northern parts of Montgomery and Bucks counties. Along the way, the route passes through the northern part of Perkasie and forms a concurrency with PA 313 in East Rockhill Township. North of here, PA 563 runs through Nockamixon State Park, heading to the north of Lake Nockamixon.

Pennsylvania Route 212

Pennsylvania Route 212 is a 14.9-mile-long (24.0 km) state highway in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. The route runs from PA 313 in Quakertown northeast to PA 611 in Durham Township, just south of the borough of Riegelsville. The route, which is a two-lane undivided road its entire length, passes through rural areas of northern Bucks County, serving Richlandtown and Springtown. PA 212 has a concurrency with PA 412 through the Springtown area.

Pennsylvania Route 507

Pennsylvania Route 507 is a 27.2-mile-long (43.8 km) state highway located in Monroe, Wayne, and Pike Counties in Pennsylvania. The southern terminus is at PA 435 and at an interchange with Interstate 380 (I-380) near Gouldsboro. The northern terminus is at U.S. Route 6 in Palmyra Township. PA 507 runs southwest-northeast as a two-lane undivided through forests in the upper reaches of the Pocono Mountains, with the northern section nearly parallel to Lake Wallenpaupack. The route passes through Gouldsboro before it crosses PA 196 in Angels. In Newfoundland, PA 507 and PA 191 run concurrent for about 2 miles (3.2 km) and intersect the north end of PA 447. After splitting from PA 191, the route has an interchange with I-84 and a junction with the northern terminus of PA 390 before ending at US 6. PA 507 was designated between US 611 west of Gouldsboro and US 6 in Tafton in 1928. The route was fully paved by the 1930s and has remained on the same alignment since.

U.S. Route 202 runs through the southeastern part of the U.S. state of Pennsylvania, passing through the western and northern suburbs of Philadelphia. It follows a general southwest to the northeast direction through the state, passing through or by West Chester, King of Prussia, Bridgeport, Norristown, Montgomeryville, Doylestown, and New Hope. US 202 enters Pennsylvania from Delaware and heads north as a divided highway, where it becomes concurrent with US 322 at an intersection with US 1 in Painters Crossing. The two routes head north and become a freeway that bypasses West Chester to the east, with US 322 splitting from US 202. US 202 continues north and east along the freeway to King of Prussia, where it reverts to an at-grade divided highway following an interchange with Interstate 76 (I-76). The route becomes a one-way pair as it passes through Bridgeport and Norristown before both directions rejoin and the road continues northeast. US 202 follows an expressway-grade parkway between Montgomeryville and Doylestown before bypassing Doylestown to the south along a freeway. The route continues northeast as an at-grade road to New Hope, where it turns into a freeway again before it crosses the Delaware River on the New Hope–Lambertville Toll Bridge into New Jersey.

U.S. Route 202 Business (Montgomeryville–Doylestown, Pennsylvania)

U.S. Route 202 Business is a 10-mile (16 km) business route of US 202 in Montgomery and Bucks counties in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania, running between Montgomeryville and Doylestown. The route heads northeast from US 202 in Upper Gwynedd Township along five-lane Dekalb Pike through residential and commercial areas. In Montgomeryville, the route turns north to run concurrent with Pennsylvania Route 309 on five-lane Bethlehem Pike past several businesses. US 202 Bus. splits from PA 309 by turning northeast onto two-lane Doylestown Road. The route crosses into Bucks County and becomes Butler Avenue, passing through Chalfont and New Britain and curving east. West of Doylestown, the business route ends at an interchange with PA 611 in Doylestown Township.

There are several special routes of U.S. Route 202 that exist. The list is organized by state south-to-north, then west-to-east.

Butler Pike is a road in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, that runs northeast from Conshohocken to Horsham Township. For most of its 9.8-mile (15.8 km) length, it is a county road and forms a boundary between townships.

References

  1. 1 2 Bureau of Maintenance and Operations (January 2015). Roadway Management System Straight Line Diagrams (Report) (2015 ed.). Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 30, 2015.
  2. 1 2 3 Google (August 20, 2007). "overview map of Pennsylvania Route 313" (Map). Google Maps . Google. Retrieved August 20, 2007.
  3. 1 2 3 Bucks County, Pennsylvania (Map) (19th ed.). 1"=2000'. ADC Map. 2006. ISBN   0-87530-774-4.
  4. Davis, William W.H. (1905). History of Bucks County, Pennsylvania: From the Discovery of the Delaware to the Present Time. 1. Lewis Publishing Company. p. 675. Retrieved January 3, 2014.
  5. History of Bucks County, Pennsylvania. A. Warner & Co. 1887. p.  341 . Retrieved March 7, 2011. dublin pike bucks county.
  6. Map of Pennsylvania Showing State Highways (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1911. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 5, 2011. Retrieved January 1, 2014.
  7. Map of New Jersey (Map). Tydol Trails. 1927. Archived from the original on May 14, 2011. Retrieved February 9, 2011.
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  9. Official Road Map of Pennsylvania (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1940. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 5, 2011. Retrieved January 1, 2014.
  10. Map of Bucks County (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1946. Retrieved October 18, 2017.
  11. General Highway Map Bucks County Pennsylvania (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1950. Retrieved October 18, 2017.
  12. General Highway Map Bucks County Pennsylvania (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. 1971. Retrieved October 18, 2017.
  13. Pennsylvania Official Transportation Map (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. 1980. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 24, 2011. Retrieved January 1, 2014.
  14. General Highway Map Bucks County Pennsylvania (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. 1991. Retrieved October 18, 2017.
  15. 1 2 Google (July 30, 2015). "overview of Pennsylvania Route 313 Truck" (Map). Google Maps . Google. Retrieved July 30, 2015.
  16. Google (April 21, 2014). "overview of Pennsylvania Route 313 Alternate Truck" (Map). Google Maps . Google. Retrieved April 21, 2014.
  17. "Risk-Based Bridge Postings - State and Local Bridges" (PDF). Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. October 8, 2013. Retrieved December 18, 2014.[ permanent dead link ]

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