Penshaw

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Penshaw
Penshaw Hill.jpg
Penshaw Monument, from Herrington Country Park
Tyne and Wear UK location map.svg
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Penshaw
Location within Tyne and Wear
Metropolitan borough
Metropolitan county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town HOUGHTON LE SPRING
Postcode district DH4
Dialling code 0191
Police Northumbria
Fire Tyne and Wear
Ambulance North East
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Tyne and Wear
54°52′33″N1°29′05″W / 54.875842°N 1.484793°W / 54.875842; -1.484793 Coordinates: 54°52′33″N1°29′05″W / 54.875842°N 1.484793°W / 54.875842; -1.484793

The village of Penshawlocally /ˈpɛnʃə/ , formerly known as Painshaw or Pensher, is an area of the metropolitan district of the City of Sunderland, in Tyne and Wear, England. Historically, Penshaw was located in County Durham.

Contents

Name and etymology

The name Penshaw was recorded in the 1190s as Pencher and has its etymological genesis in Brittonic. [1] The first element is pen, meaning 'hill' or 'summit' and the second *cerr/*carr - 'stone, hard surface'. [2]

Features

Penshaw Monument, from the south Penshaw Monument on hill.jpg
Penshaw Monument, from the south

Penshaw is well known locally for Penshaw Monument, a prominent landmark built in 1844 atop Penshaw Hill, which is a half-scale replica of the Temple of Hephaestus in Athens. Owing to its proximity to Durham City, the area was allocated a Durham postcode, DH4, which forms part of the Houghton-le-Spring post town. It lies about three miles north of Houghton-le-Spring, just over the River Wear from Washington. It borders Herrington Country Park and is surrounded by a series of villages: Herrington, Shiney Row, Biddick, Coxgreen and Offerton.

Leisure facilities include the easily accessible Herrington Country Park, which contains a play area, amphitheatre, skateboard park, lake with extensive wildlife and a memorial site to Herrington Colliery which once mined the site for coal. The site hosts public events such as the county show which includes dog shows, face painting and bouncy castles. There are three public houses, The Prospect (original name recently restored), The Monument (formerly The Ship) and The Grey Horse. Though no working men's club remains, a Catholic club is situated on Station Rd. takeaway outlets include the Peach Garden, [3] Mandarin Palace, [4] Oriental House[ citation needed ] and an Indian restaurant and takeaway, the Penshaw Tandoori. [5] Community facilities include Penshaw Community Centre and All Saints' Church Hall; both organise regular spring and summer events. In the village, at the foot of Penshaw Hill, is Penshaw Riding School. At the centre of Barnwell is an extensive playing field and young person's play area. Penshaw also has three primary schools within walking distance of one other: Barnwell, New Penshaw and Our Lady Queen of Peace Roman Catholic.

There are two annual events for children, an easter egg rolling competition on Penshaw Hill [6] and a scarecrow hunt organised by the village community.

An annual cross-country event takes place in June each year when Sunderland Harriers stage the Penshaw Hill Race with a presentation to the winner and runners up in The Monument public house after the race.

There are extensive views from the top of Penshaw Hill on a clear day: Durham Cathedral to the South West, the coast of Roker and Seaburn to the East and the Cheviot Hills to the North.

The Hill, as it is known locally, also overlooks Wearside Golf Club, a long-established golf club originating in 1892 and Sunderland AFC's Stadium of Light can also be seen clearly from here.

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References

  1. "The P-Celtic Place-Names of North-East England and South-East Scotland - Early Attestations".
  2. "The Brittonic Language in the Old North - A Guide to the Place-Name Evidence" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 13 August 2017. Retrieved 3 July 2018.
  3. "Peach Garden Takeaway".
  4. "Mandarin Palace Takeaway".
  5. "Penshaw Tandoori".
  6. "Penshaw Bowl".

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