Penza Oblast

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Penza Oblast
Пензенская область
Flag of Penza Oblast.svg
Flag
Coat of arms of Penza Oblast.svg
Coat of arms
Anthem: Anthem of Penza Oblast [1]
Map of Russia - Penza Oblast.svg
Coordinates: 53°15′N44°34′E / 53.250°N 44.567°E / 53.250; 44.567 Coordinates: 53°15′N44°34′E / 53.250°N 44.567°E / 53.250; 44.567
CountryRussia
Federal district Volga [2]
Economic region Volga [3]
EstablishedFebruary 4, 1939 [4]
Administrative center Penza [5]
Government
  Body Legislative Assembly [6]
   Governor [6] Oleg Melnichenko (interim) [7]
Area
[8]
  Total43,200 km2 (16,700 sq mi)
Area rank 59th
Population
  Rank 32nd
   Rural
32.9%
Time zone UTC+3 (MSK   OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg [9] )
ISO 3166 code RU-PNZ
License plates 58
OKTMO ID56000000
Official languagesRussian [10]
Website http://pnzreg.ru

Penza Oblast (Russian : Пе́нзенская о́бласть, Penzenskaya oblast) is a federal subject of Russia (an oblast). Its administrative center is the city of Penza. As of the 2010 Census, its population was 1,386,186. [11]

Contents

Geography

Main rivers

The Sura River Sura River in Penza IMG 2613.JPG
The Sura River

Penza Oblast has over 3000 rivers; the overall length is 15,458 km. The biggest rivers are:

Fauna

There are 316 species of vertebrates within the region, including:

Seven existing species of mammals were already acclimatized on land: the American mink, muskrat, raccoon dog, wild boar, Siberian roe deer, red deer and Sika deer. In parallel, work has been carried out to reintroduce the Forest-steppe marmot, the Eurasian beaver and the Russian desman (a species of mole that resembles a muskrat).

In the waters of Penza Oblast, there are about 50 species of fish. The largest body of water – the Sursko reservoir – is home to around 30 species. Commercial species include bream, silver bream, pikeperch, ide, and catfish. In the rivers and smalls pond dwell roach, perch, carp, and pike. The most valuable fish to be found in the natural waters is the sterlet.

Climate

Climate data for Penza (1961-1990)
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °C (°F)6.0
(42.8)
5.0
(41.0)
17.0
(62.6)
30.0
(86.0)
35.4
(95.7)
38.0
(100.4)
37.8
(100.0)
37.2
(99.0)
32.5
(90.5)
25.0
(77.0)
13.4
(56.1)
8.0
(46.4)
38.0
(100.4)
Average high °C (°F)−6.9
(19.6)
−5.8
(21.6)
0.3
(32.5)
11.7
(53.1)
21.2
(70.2)
24.4
(75.9)
25.7
(78.3)
23.7
(74.7)
17.6
(63.7)
8.9
(48.0)
0.4
(32.7)
−4.3
(24.3)
9.7
(49.5)
Daily mean °C (°F)−9.8
(14.4)
−10.0
(14.0)
−4.2
(24.4)
6.4
(43.5)
13.9
(57.0)
18.0
(64.4)
19.2
(66.6)
17.1
(62.8)
11.6
(52.9)
4.5
(40.1)
−2.9
(26.8)
−7.7
(18.1)
4.7
(40.5)
Average low °C (°F)−13.9
(7.0)
−13.5
(7.7)
−7.1
(19.2)
1.7
(35.1)
8.1
(46.6)
12.5
(54.5)
14.2
(57.6)
11.9
(53.4)
7.1
(44.8)
1.3
(34.3)
−4.4
(24.1)
−10.4
(13.3)
0.6
(33.1)
Record low °C (°F)−39.0
(−38.2)
−40.0
(−40.0)
−31.1
(−24.0)
−20.0
(−4.0)
−6.0
(21.2)
−2.2
(28.0)
2.0
(35.6)
0.6
(33.1)
−6.1
(21.0)
−17.2
(1.0)
−31.1
(−24.0)
−40.0
(−40.0)
−40.0
(−40.0)
Average precipitation mm (inches)41
(1.6)
29
(1.1)
32
(1.3)
36
(1.4)
41
(1.6)
62
(2.4)
67
(2.6)
56
(2.2)
53
(2.1)
49
(1.9)
52
(2.0)
45
(1.8)
563
(22.2)
Source: Гидрометцентр, Погода и Климат

History

The regional center of Penza was built in 1663 as a Russian fortress on the border of the Wild Fields, although evidence of the presence of more ancient settlements has been found in the modern city.

Penza Province was established within Kazan Governorate in 1718. It became a separate Penza Governorate on September 15, 1780, which existed until March 5, 1797, when it was dissolved and merged into Saratov Governorate. Penza Governorate was re-established on September 9, 1801 and existed until 1928. Between 1928 and 1937, the territory of the former governorate underwent a number of administrative transformations, ending up as a part of Tambov Oblast in 1937. On February 4, 1939, modern Penza Oblast was established [4] by splitting it out of Tambov Oblast. In March 1939, the Penza Oblast Committee of the CPSU was formed, the first secretary of the committee being Alexander Kabanov.

Administrative divisions

Economy

Penza Oblast is part of the Volga economic region. The oblast is one of Russia's leading producers of wheat, rye, oats, millet, buckwheat, cereal and forage crops, vegetables, potatoes, mustard , and meat. [12]

Politics

Seat of the Oblast government 800px-Zdanie Pravitel'stva Penzenskoi Oblasti.jpg
Seat of the Oblast government

During the Soviet period, the high authority in the oblast was shared among three persons: The first secretary of the Penza CPSU Committee (who in reality had the biggest authority), the chairman of the oblast Soviet (legislative power), and the Chairman of the oblast Executive Committee (executive power). Since 1991, CPSU lost all the power, and the head of the Oblast administration, and eventually the governor was appointed/elected alongside elected regional parliament.

The Charter of Penza Oblast is the fundamental law of the region. The Legislative Assembly of Penza Oblast is the province's standing legislative (representative) body. The Legislative Assembly exercises its authority by passing laws, resolutions, and other legal acts and by supervising the implementation and observance of the laws and other legal acts passed by it. The highest executive body is the Oblast Government, which includes territorial executive bodies such as district administrations, committees, and commissions that facilitate development and run the day to day matters of the province. The Oblast administration supports the activities of the Governor who is the highest official and acts as guarantor of the observance of the oblast Charter in accordance with the Constitution of Russia.

Demographics

Population: 1,386,186(2010 Census); [11] 1,452,941(2002 Census); [13] 1,504,309(1989 Census). [14]

Vital statistics for 2012

2009 - 1.38 | 2010 - 1.37 | 2011 - 1.36 | 2012 - 1.48 | 2013 - 1.49 | 2014 - 1.53 | 2015 - 1.55 | 2016 - 1.50(e)

Ethnic composition (2010): [11]

Religion

Religion in Penza Oblast as of 2012 (Sreda Arena Atlas) [19] [20]
Russian Orthodoxy
62.9%
Other Orthodox
0.7%
Other Christians
2.2%
Islam
5.7%
Spiritual but not religious
14.6%
Atheism and irreligion
9.1%
Other and undeclared
4.8%

According to a 2012 survey, [19] 62.9% of the population of Penza Oblast adheres to the Russian Orthodox Church, 2% are unaffiliated generic Christians, 1% are Orthodox Christian believers without belonging to churches or members of non-Russian Orthodox churches, and 7% are Muslims. In addition, 15% of the population declares to be "spiritual but not religious", 9% is atheist, and 3.1% follows other religions or did not give an answer to the question. [19]

Troitse-Scanov Convent Troice-scanov monastery DSC08705.jpg
Troitse-Scanov Convent
Tourists near Oldman Khopyor at river source Oldman Hopyor IMG 0226.JPG
Tourists near Oldman Khopyor at river source

Culture and recreation

Tourism

Notable people

See also

Related Research Articles

Kuznetsk Town in Penza Oblast, Russia

Kuznetsk is a town in Penza Oblast, Russia, located in the foothills of the Volga Upland, mainly on the left bank of the Truyov River. Population: 88,839 (2010 Census); 92,050 (2002 Census); 98,588 (1989 Census).

Belinsky, Penza Oblast Town in Penza Oblast, Russia

Belinsky is a town and the administrative center of Belinsky District in Penza Oblast, Russia, located at the confluence of the rivers Bolshoy Chembar and Maly Chembar, 129 kilometers (80 mi) west of Penza, the administrative center of the oblast. Population: 8,565 (2010 Census); 8,837 (2002 Census); 9,028 (1989 Census).

Bashmakovsky District District in Penza Oblast, Russia

Bashmakovsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-seven in Penza Oblast, Russia. It is located in the west of the oblast. The area of the district is 1,618 square kilometers (625 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Bashmakovo. Population: 23,304 ; 25,159 (2002 Census); 28,032 (1989 Census). The population of Bashmakovo accounts for 44.7% of the district's total population.

Belinsky District District in Penza Oblast, Russia

Belinsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-seven in Penza Oblast, Russia. It is located in the west of the oblast. The area of the district is 2,124 square kilometers (820 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Belinsky. Population: 28,881 ; 33,569 (2002 Census); 38,997 (1989 Census). The population of the administrative center accounts for 29.7% of the district's total population.

Bessonovsky District District in Penza Oblast, Russia

Bessonovsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-seven in Penza Oblast, Russia. It is located in the center of the oblast. The area of the district is 1,249 square kilometers (482 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Bessonovka. Population: 45,296 ; 41,647 (2002 Census); 45,515 (1989 Census). The population of Bessonovka accounts for 25.2% of the district's total population.

Kamensky District, Penza Oblast District in Penza Oblast, Russia

Kamensky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-seven in Penza Oblast, Russia. It is located in the western central part of the oblast. The area of the district is 2,174 square kilometers (839 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Kamenka. Population: 62,322 ; 24,275 (2002 Census); 27,235 (1989 Census). The population of Kamenka accounts for 63.5% of the district's total population.

Kameshkirsky District District in Penza Oblast, Russia

Kameshkirsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-seven in Penza Oblast, Russia. It is located in the southeast of the oblast. The area of the district is 1,270 square kilometers (490 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Russky Kameshkir. Population: 12,802 ; 14,404 (2002 Census); 16,733 (1989 Census). The population of Russky Kameshkir accounts for 41.9% of the district's total population.

Kolyshleysky District District in Penza Oblast, Russia

Kolyshleysky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-seven in Penza Oblast, Russia. It is located in the south of the oblast. The area of the district is 1,685 square kilometers (651 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Kolyshley. Population: 26,187 ; 27,751 (2002 Census); 29,125 (1989 Census). The population of Kolyshley accounts for 31.7% of the district's total population.

Luninsky District District in Penza Oblast, Russia

Luninsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-seven in Penza Oblast, Russia. It is located in the north of the oblast. The area of the district is 1,705 square kilometers (658 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Lunino. Population: 19,944 ; 23,247 (2002 Census); 26,211 (1989 Census). The population of Lunino accounts for 39.6% of the district's total population.

Narovchatsky District District in Penza Oblast, Russia

Narovchatsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-seven in Penza Oblast, Russia. It is located in the northwest of the oblast. The area of the district is 956.9 square kilometers (369.5 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Narovchat. Population: 12,069 ; 13,839 (2002 Census); 15,718 (1989 Census). The population of Narovchat accounts for 34.8% of the district's total population.

Neverkinsky District District in Penza Oblast, Russia

Neverkinsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-seven in Penza Oblast, Russia. It is located in the southeast of the oblast. The area of the district is 984.5 square kilometers (380.1 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Neverkino. Population: 16,329 ; 18,538 (2002 Census); 19,247 (1989 Census). The population of Neverkino accounts for 26.8% of the district's total population.

Nikolsky District, Penza Oblast District in Penza Oblast, Russia

Nikolsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-seven in Penza Oblast, Russia. It is located in the northeast of the oblast. The area of the district is 2,511.9 square kilometers (969.9 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Nikolsk. Population: 34,271 ; 39,175 (2002 Census); 46,619 (1989 Census). The population of Nikolsk accounts for 65.6% of the district's total population.

Pachelmsky District District in Penza Oblast, Russia

Pachelmsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-seven in Penza Oblast, Russia. It is located in the west of the oblast. The area of the district is 1,300 square kilometers (500 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Pachelma. As of the 2010 Census, the total population of the district was 16,310, with the population of Pachelma accounting for 49.4% of that number.

Penzensky District District in Penza Oblast, Russia

Penzensky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-seven in Penza Oblast, Russia. It is located in the center of the oblast. The area of the district is 2,823.8 square kilometers (1,090.3 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Kondol. Population: 51,308 ; 41,318 (2002 Census); 41,323 (1989 Census). The population of Kondol accounts for 6.5% of the district's total population.

Shemysheysky District District in Penza Oblast, Russia

Shemysheysky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-seven in Penza Oblast, Russia. It is located in the southeastern central part of the oblast. The area of the district is 1,688 square kilometers (652 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Shemysheyka. Population: 17,661 ; 19,063 (2002 Census); 22,714 (1989 Census). The population of Shemysheyka accounts for 36.9% of the district's total population.

Sosnovoborsky District District in Penza Oblast, Russia

Sosnovoborsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-seven in Penza Oblast, Russia. It is located in the east of the oblast. The area of the district is 1,567 square kilometers (605 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Sosnovoborsk. Population: 17,242 ; 20,510 (2002 Census); 23,930 (1989 Census). The population of Sosnovoborsk accounts for 38.0% of the district's total population.

Spassky District, Penza Oblast District in Penza Oblast, Russia

Spassky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-seven in Penza Oblast, Russia. It is located in the northwest of the oblast. The area of the district is 693.3 square kilometers (267.7 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Spassk. Population: 13,008 ; 13,827 (2002 Census); 15,475 (1989 Census). The population of Spassk accounts for 57.2% of the district's total population.

Tamalinsky District District in Penza Oblast, Russia

Tamalinsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-seven in Penza Oblast, Russia. It is located in the southwest of the oblast. The area of the district is 1,236 square kilometers (477 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Tamala. Population: 16,503 ; 19,083 (2002 Census); 21,289 (1989 Census). The population of Tamala accounts for 45.3% of the district's total population.

Vadinsky District District in Penza Oblast, Russia

Vadinsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-seven in Penza Oblast, Russia. It is located in the northwest of the oblast. The area of the district is 1,040 square kilometers (400 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Vadinsk. Population: 9,807 ; 11,218 (2002 Census); 14,137 (1989 Census). The population of Vadinsk accounts for 49.9% of the district's total population.

Zemetchinsky District District in Penza Oblast, Russia

Zemetchinsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-seven in Penza Oblast, Russia. It is located in the northwest of the oblast. The area of the district is 2,103.2 square kilometers (812.1 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Zemetchino. Population: 24,674 ; 31,072 (2002 Census); 38,566 (1989 Census). The population of Zemetchino accounts for 43.7% of the district's total population.

References

Notes

  1. Law #828-ZPO
  2. Президент Российской Федерации. Указ №849 от 13 мая 2000 г. «О полномочном представителе Президента Российской Федерации в федеральном округе». Вступил в силу 13 мая 2000 г. Опубликован: "Собрание законодательства РФ", No. 20, ст. 2112, 15 мая 2000 г. (President of the Russian Federation. Decree #849 of May 13, 2000 On the Plenipotentiary Representative of the President of the Russian Federation in a Federal District. Effective as of May 13, 2000.).
  3. Госстандарт Российской Федерации. №ОК 024-95 27 декабря 1995 г. «Общероссийский классификатор экономических регионов. 2. Экономические районы», в ред. Изменения №5/2001 ОКЭР. (Gosstandart of the Russian Federation. #OK 024-95 December 27, 1995 Russian Classification of Economic Regions. 2. Economic Regions, as amended by the Amendment #5/2001 OKER. ).
  4. 1 2 USSR. Administrative-Territorial Divisions of the Union Republics, p. 202
  5. Charter of Penza Oblast, Article 8
  6. 1 2 Charter of Penza Oblast, Article 7
  7. Федеральная служба государственной статистики (Federal State Statistics Service) (May 21, 2004). "Территория, число районов, населённых пунктов и сельских администраций по субъектам Российской Федерации (Territory, Number of Districts, Inhabited Localities, and Rural Administration by Federal Subjects of the Russian Federation)". Всероссийская перепись населения 2002 года (All-Russia Population Census of 2002) (in Russian). Federal State Statistics Service. Retrieved November 1, 2011.
  8. "Об исчислении времени". Официальный интернет-портал правовой информации (in Russian). June 3, 2011. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  9. Official throughout the Russian Federation according to Article 68.1 of the Constitution of Russia.
  10. 1 2 3 Russian Federal State Statistics Service (2011). "Всероссийская перепись населения 2010 года. Том 1" [2010 All-Russian Population Census, vol. 1]. Всероссийская перепись населения 2010 года [2010 All-Russia Population Census] (in Russian). Federal State Statistics Service.
  11. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on October 24, 2013. Retrieved October 24, 2013.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  12. Russian Federal State Statistics Service (May 21, 2004). "Численность населения России, субъектов Российской Федерации в составе федеральных округов, районов, городских поселений, сельских населённых пунктов – районных центров и сельских населённых пунктов с населением 3 тысячи и более человек" [Population of Russia, Its Federal Districts, Federal Subjects, Districts, Urban Localities, Rural Localities—Administrative Centers, and Rural Localities with Population of Over 3,000](XLS). Всероссийская перепись населения 2002 года [All-Russia Population Census of 2002] (in Russian).
  13. "Всесоюзная перепись населения 1989 г. Численность наличного населения союзных и автономных республик, автономных областей и округов, краёв, областей, районов, городских поселений и сёл-райцентров" [All Union Population Census of 1989: Present Population of Union and Autonomous Republics, Autonomous Oblasts and Okrugs, Krais, Oblasts, Districts, Urban Settlements, and Villages Serving as District Administrative Centers]. Всесоюзная перепись населения 1989 года [All-Union Population Census of 1989] (in Russian). Институт демографии Национального исследовательского университета: Высшая школа экономики [Institute of Demography at the National Research University: Higher School of Economics]. 1989 via Demoscope Weekly.
  14. "Естественное движение населения в разрезе субъектов Российской Федерации". Gks.ru. Retrieved December 21, 2017.
  15. "Каталог публикаций::Федеральная служба государственной статистики". Gks.ru. Retrieved December 21, 2017.
  16. "Перепись-2010: русских становится больше". Perepis-2010.ru. December 19, 2011. Retrieved December 25, 2012.
  17. Официальный портал Правительства Пензенской области - О регионе - Население [Official portal of the Government of Penza oblast - About the region - Population]. penza.ru (in Russian). Archived from the original on May 26, 2008.
  18. 1 2 3 "Arena: Atlas of Religions and Nationalities in Russia". Sreda, 2012.
  19. 2012 Arena Atlas Religion Maps. "Ogonek", № 34 (5243), 27/08/2012. Retrieved 21/04/2017. Archived.
  20. "Professor Victor A. Skumin, D.M.Sci" (in Russian). 2009. Archived from the original on April 25, 2012. Retrieved January 6, 2012.
  21. Bendet, Ia. A.; Morozov, S. M.; Skumin, V. A. (1980). "Psychological aspects of the rehabilitation of patients after the surgical treatment of heart defects" Психологические аспекты реабилитации больных после хирургического лечения пороков сердца [Psychological aspects of the rehabilitation of patients after the surgical treatment of heart defects]. Kardiologiia (in Russian). 20 (6): 45–51. PMID   7392405. Archived from the original on September 5, 2017. Retrieved July 1, 2017.
  22. "Skumin syndrome". Genex (in Russian). Archived from the original on March 19, 2017. Retrieved January 6, 2012.
  23. Ruzza, Andrea (16 October 2013). "Nonpsychotic mental disorder after open heart surgery". Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals . 22 (3): 374. doi:10.1177/0218492313493427. PMID   24585929. S2CID   28990767.
  24. Skumin, V. A. (1982). Nepsikhoticheskie narusheniia psikhiki u bol'nykh s priobretennymi porokami serdtsa do i posle operatsii (obzor) [Nonpsychotic mental disorders in patients with acquired heart defects before and after surgery (review)]. Zhurnal nevropatologii i psikhiatrii imeni S.S. Korsakova . 82. OCLC   112979417 . Retrieved June 15, 2019.

Sources